jam

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See also: jamb, Jam., and JAM

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /d​͡ʒæm/
  • (file)
    - fruit spread
  • (file)
    - verb
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æm
  • Homophone: jamb

Etymology 1[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Noun[edit]

jam (countable and uncountable, plural jams)

  1. A sweet mixture of fruit boiled with sugar and allowed to congeal. Often spread on bread or toast or used in jam tarts.
  2. (countable) A difficult situation.
    I’m in a jam right now. Can you help me out?
    • 1975, Bob Dylan, Tangled Up in Blue
      She was married when we first met
      Soon to be divorced
      I helped her out of a jam, I guess
      But I used a little too much force.
  3. (countable) Blockage, congestion.
    A traffic jam caused us to miss the game's first period.
    a jam of logs in a river
  4. (countable, popular music) An informal, impromptu performance or rehearsal.
  5. (countable, baseball) A difficult situation for a pitcher or defending team.
    He's in a jam now, having walked the bases loaded with the cleanup hitter coming to bat.
  6. (countable, basketball) A forceful dunk.
  7. (countable, roller derby) A play during which points can be scored.
    Toughie scored four points in that jam.
  8. (countable) Any of several rock-climbing maneuvers requiring wedging of an extremity into a tight space.
    I used a whole series of fist and foot jams in that crack.
  9. (UK) luck.
    He's got more jam than Waitrose.
  10. (mining) Alternative form of jamb.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
See also[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

jam (third-person singular simple present jams, present participle jamming, simple past and past participle jammed)

  1. To get something stuck in a confined space.
    My foot got jammed in a gap between the rocks.
  2. To brusquely force something into a space; cram, squeeze.
    They temporarily stopped the gas tank leak by jamming a piece of taffy into the hole.
    The rush-hour train was jammed with commuters.
  3. To cause congestion or blockage. Often used with "up"
    A single accident can jam the roads for hours.
  4. To block or confuse a broadcast signal.
  5. (baseball) To throw a pitch at or near the batter's hands.
    Jones was jammed by the pitch.
  6. (music) To play music (especially improvisation as a group, or an informal unrehearsed session).
  7. To injure a finger or toe by sudden compression of the digit's tip.
    When he tripped on the step he jammed his toe.
  8. (roller derby) To attempt to score points.
    Toughie jammed four times in the second period.
  9. (nautical) To bring (a vessel) so close to the wind that half her upper sails are laid aback.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of W. C. Russell to this entry?)
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Persian or Hindi, meaning "garment, robe"; related to pajamas.

Noun[edit]

jam (plural jams)

  1. (dated) A kind of frock for children.

Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ésmi (I am, I exist), compare English am.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

jam (first-person singular past tense qeshë, participle qenë)

  1. I am

Conjugation[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Czech[edit]

Noun[edit]

jam m

  1. yam (any Dioscorea vine)

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

jam m (plural jams, diminutive jammetje n)

  1. jam (conserved fruits where no parts of fruits are visible anymore)

Related terms[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin iam.

Adverb[edit]

jam

  1. already

Indonesian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Malay jam, from Sanskrit याम (yāma, time).

Noun[edit]

jam

  1. hour (Time period of sixty minutes)
  2. clock (instrument to measure or keep track of time)

Interlingua[edit]

Adverb[edit]

jam (not comparable)

  1. already

Latgalian[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

jam m

  1. (third-person singular) dative form of jis.
    Vys jam nazkas natai. 'It's never good enough for him. (He's never satisfied.)'
    Es jam atsaceju par reizi. 'I replied to him right away.'
    Jam daguoja laistīs paceli nu sātys. 'He had to leave his home.'

Latin[edit]

Adverb[edit]

jam (not comparable)

  1. Alternative form of iam.

Lithuanian[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

jam m

  1. (third-person singular) dative form of jis.
    • 2007, Jurga (Jurga Šeduikytė), Angelai
      Jo balti sparnai man tinka
      Jam savo šarvus dovanoju
      His white wings suit me
      I present to him my armor

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

jam

  1. rafsi of jamna.

Malay[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Sanskrit याम (yāma, time).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

jam (Jawi spelling جم, plural jam-jam)

  1. hour (Time period of sixty minutes)
  2. clock (instrument to measure or keep track of time)

North Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cognate with West Frisian jimme

Pronoun[edit]

jam

  1. you (plural)
  2. your (plural)

Welsh[edit]

Noun[edit]

jam m

  1. jam