finger

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: Finger

English[edit]

A human hand, showing its four fingers and thumb.
An X-ray of human fingers.
The Egyptian hieroglyph for "finger" (ḏbˁ, D50).
Fish fingers.

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English finger, from Old English finger(finger), from Proto-Germanic *fingraz(finger) (compare West Frisian finger, Low German/German Finger, Dutch vinger, Danish finger), from Proto-Indo-European *pénkʷrós, *penkʷ-ros 'fifth' (compare Old Irish cóicer 'set of five people', Old Armenian հինգեր-որդ(hinger-ord, fifth)), from *pénkʷe(five). More at five.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

finger (plural fingers)

  1. (anatomy) A slender jointed extremity of the human hand, (usually) exclusive of the thumb.
    Humans have two hands and ten fingers. Each hand has one thumb and four fingers.
    • 1916, The Finger Talk of Chicago's Wheat-Pit, Popular Science Monthly, Vol. 89, p. 81:
      Each finger extended represents one-eighth of a cent. Thus when all four fingers and the thumb are extended, all being spread out from one another, it means five-eighths.
    • 2014 March 29, “Don’t cramp my style”, in The Economist, volume 410, number 8880:
      In 1993 [Victor Candia] noticed that the fingers of his left hand were starting to curl up as he played [on his guitar]. It felt to him as if a magnet in his palm were preventing him from opening them. A week later, he could not play at all.
  2. (zoology) Similar or similar-looking extremities in other animals, particularly:
    1. The lower, smaller segment of an arthropod claw.
    2. One of the supporting structures of wings in birds, bats, &c. evolved from earlier toes or fingers.
    3. One of the slender bony structures before the pectoral fins of gurnards and sea robins (Triglidae).
  3. Something similar in shape to the human finger, particularly:
    • 1814, William Wordsworth, The Excursion, p. 250:
      ...spires whose ‘silent finger points to Heaven’...
    1. (cooking) Finger-shaped pieces of food.
      chocolate fingers; fish fingers; cheese fingers
    2. (Britain regional, botany, usually in plural, obsolete) Synonym of foxglove (D. purpurea).
  4. Something similarly extending, (chiefly) from a larger body, particularly:
    a finger of land; a finger of smoke
    1. (botany) Various protruding plant structures, as a banana from its hand.
    2. (anatomy, obsolete) A lobe of the liver.
    3. (historical) The teeth parallel to the blade of a scythe, fitted to a wooden frame called a crade.
    4. The projections of a reaper or mower which similarly separate the stalks for cutting.
    5. (nautical) Short for finger pier: a shorter, narrower pier projecting from a larger dock.
    6. (aviation) Synonym of jet bridge: the narrow elevated walkway connecting a plane to an airport.
  5. Something similar in function or agency to the human finger, (usually) with regard to touching, grasping, or pointing.
    • 1611, Bible (KJV), Exodus 8:19:
      The Magicians said vnto Pharaoh; This is the finger of God.
    1. (obsolete) Synonym of hand, the part of a clock pointing to the hour, minute, or second.
    2. (US, obsolete slang) A policeman or prison guard.
    3. (US, rare slang) An informer to the police, (chiefly) one who identifies a criminal during a lineup.
    4. (US, rare slang) A criminal who scouts for prospective victims and targets or who performs reconnaissance before a crime.
  6. (units of measure) Various units of measure based or notionally based on the adult human finger, particularly
    1. (historical) Synonym of digit: former units of measure notionally based on its width but variously standardized, (chiefly) the English digit of 116 foot (about 1.9 cm).
      • Bishop John Wilkins (1614-1672)
        a piece of steel three fingers thick
    2. (historical) A unit of length notionally based on the length of an adult human's middle finger, standardized as 4½ inches (11.43 cm).
    3. (historical) Synonym of digit: 112 the observed diameter of the sun or moon, (chiefly) with regard to eclipses.
    4. (alcohol, originally US) An informal measure of alcohol based on its height in a given glass compared to the width of the pourer's fingers while holding it.
      Gimme three fingers of bourbon.
  7. (fashion) A part of a glove intended to cover a finger.
  8. (informal, obsolete) Skill in the use of the fingers, as in playing upon a musical instrument.
  9. (informal, rare) Someone skilled in the use of their fingers, (chiefly) a pickpocket.
  10. (Britain slang) A person.

Synonyms[edit]

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

finger (third-person singular simple present fingers, present participle fingering, simple past and past participle fingered)

  1. (transitive) To identify or point out. Also put the finger on. To report to or identify for the authorities, rat on, rat out, squeal on, tattle on, turn in, to finger.
  2. (transitive) To poke or probe with a finger or fingers.
    • Shakespeare
      Let the papers lie; / You would be fingering them to anger me.
    • 2009, Win Blevins, Dreams Beneath Your Feet, page 135:
      Feeling tender around the face, she fingered herself gingerly. Yes, it was swollen, very sore around the cheekbones, with dried blood on the outsides of her eye sockets, below her nostrils, and below one ear.
  3. (transitive) To use the fingers to penetrate and sexually stimulate one's own or another person's vagina or anus; to fingerbang
    • 2007, Madeline Bastinado, A Talent for Surrender, page 201:
      She fingered him, spreading the gel and sliding the tip of her finger inside him.
    • 2008, Thomas Wainwright (editor), Erotic Tales, page 56:
      She smiled, a look of amazement on her face, as if thinking that maybe this was the cock that she had been fantasizing about just now, as she fingered herself to a massive, body-engulfing orgasm.
  4. (transitive, music) To use specified finger positions in producing notes on a musical instrument.
  5. (transitive, music) To provide instructions in written music as to which fingers are to be used to produce particular notes or passages.
  6. (transitive, computing) To query (a user's status) using the Finger protocol.
    • 1996, "Yves Bellefeuille", List of useful freeware, comp.archives.msdos.d, Usenet:
      PGP mail welcome (finger me for my key).
  7. (obsolete) To steal; to purloin.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  8. (transitive, obsolete) To execute, as any delicate work.

Translations[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

References[edit]

  • "finger, n., in the Oxford English Dictionary, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse fingr, from Proto-Germanic *fingraz, from Proto-Indo-European *pénkʷrós.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fenɡər/, [ˈfeŋˀɐ]

Noun[edit]

finger c ( singular definite fingeren, plural indefinite fingre)

  1. finger
Inflection[edit]
External links[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See fingere(to simulate).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fenɡɡeːr/, [ˈfeŋɡ̊eːˀɐ̯], [ˈfeŋɡ̊eɐ̯ˀ]

Verb[edit]

finger or fingér

  1. imperative of fingere

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse fingr, from Proto-Germanic *fingraz, from Proto-Indo-European *pénkʷrós.

Noun[edit]

finger m (definite singular fingeren, indefinite plural fingre or fingrer, definite plural fingrene)

  1. (anatomy) a finger

Related terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse fingr, from Proto-Germanic *fingraz, from Proto-Indo-European *pénkʷrós.

Noun[edit]

finger m (definite singular fingeren, indefinite plural fingrar, definite plural fingrane)

  1. (anatomy) a finger

Related terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *fingraz, which is from Proto-Indo-European *pénkʷrós, *penkʷ-ros, a suffixed form of *pénkʷe(five). Compare Old Frisian finger, Old Saxon fingar, Old High German fingar, Old Norse fingr, Gothic 𐍆𐌹𐌲𐌲𐍂𐍃(figgrs).

Noun[edit]

finger m

  1. finger

Declension[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


Old Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *fingraz, from Proto-Indo-European *pénkʷrós. Compare Old English finger, Old Saxon fingar, Old High German fingar, Old Norse fingr.

Noun[edit]

finger m

  1. finger

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse fingr, from Proto-Germanic *fingraz.

Noun[edit]

finger m

  1. finger

Declension[edit]

or (with neuter gender)

Descendants[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sv

Etymology[edit]

From Old Swedish finger, from Old Norse fingr, from Proto-Germanic *fingraz, from Proto-Indo-European *pénkʷrós.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

finger n, c

  1. (anatomy) a finger (the body part)

Declension[edit]

Genus[edit]

The neuter declension is much more common than the common declination.

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]


West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian finger, from Proto-Germanic *fingraz, from Proto-Indo-European *pénkʷrós. Compare English finger, Dutch vinger, Low German and German Finger, Danish finger.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

finger c (plural fingers)

  1. finger