eclipse

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See also: éclipse, éclipsé, and eclipsé

English[edit]

An eclipse of the Sun by Saturn, seen from the Cassini orbiter
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Etymology[edit]

From Old French eclipse, from Latin eclīpsis, from Ancient Greek ἔκλειψις (ékleipsis, eclipse), from ἐκλείπω (ekleípō, I abandon, go missing, vanish), from ἐκ (ek, out) and λείπω (leípō, I leave behind).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɪˈklɪps/, /iˈklɪps/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: eclipse

Noun[edit]

eclipse (plural eclipses)

  1. (astronomy) An alignment of astronomical objects whereby one object comes between the observer (or notional observer) and another object, thus obscuring the latter.
  2. Especially, an alignment whereby a planetary object (for example, the Moon) comes between the Sun and another planetary object (for example, the Earth), resulting in a shadow being cast by the middle planetary object onto the other planetary object.
  3. A seasonal state of plumage in some birds, notably ducks, adopted temporarily after the breeding season and characterised by a dull and scruffy appearance.
  4. Obscurity, decline, downfall

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

eclipse (third-person singular simple present eclipses, present participle eclipsing, simple past and past participle eclipsed)

  1. (transitive) Of astronomical bodies, to cause an eclipse.
    The Moon eclipsed the Sun.
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To overshadow; to be better or more noticeable than.
    • c. 1591, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 3, Act 4, Scene 6, 1869, George Long Duyckinck (editor), The Complete Works of William Shakespeare, page 502,
      For, till I see them here, by doubtful fear / My joy of liberty is half eclips'd.
    • 2005, Sean Campbell, Introducing Microsoft Visual Basic 2005 for developers (page 56)
      The Util.System namespace eclipses the top-level System namespace.
    • 2007, Cincinnati Magazine (page 81)
      Everything about her year-old restaurant [] reflects her love of bringing people to the table for good, simple food that's not eclipsed by bells and whistles.
  3. (Irish grammar) To undergo eclipsis.

Translations[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin eclīpsis.

Noun[edit]

eclipse m (plural eclipses)

  1. eclipse

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin eclīpsis.

Noun[edit]

eclipse f (plural eclipses)

  1. eclipse

Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

eclīpse

  1. ablative singular of eclīpsis

Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

eclipse m (oblique plural eclipses, nominative singular eclipses, nominative plural eclipse)

  1. eclipse

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

eclipse m (plural eclipses)

  1. eclipse

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

eclipse

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of eclipsar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of eclipsar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of eclipsar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of eclipsar

Spanish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin eclīpsis.

Noun[edit]

eclipse m (plural eclipses)

  1. eclipse
  2. disappearance

Alternative forms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See etymology on the main entry.

Verb[edit]

eclipse

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of eclipsar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of eclipsar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of eclipsar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of eclipsar.

Further reading[edit]