bloke

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See also: blöke and bloķē

English[edit]

Alternative spellings[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unknown, [from 1847]. Hypotheses include:[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) enPR: blōk, IPA(key): /bləʊk/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -əʊk

Noun[edit]

bloke (plural blokes)

  1. (Britain, informal) A man, a fellow; an ordinary man, a man on the street. [From 1847.]
    • 1847, George W. M. Reynolds, The Mysteries of London (volume 3), G. Vickers, London, page 66:
      He buzzed a bloak and a shakester of a yack and a skin.
    • 1930, P. G. Wodehouse, Very Good, Jeeves, 2006, Overlook Press, page 235,
      The door flew open, and there was a bloke with spectacles on his face and all round the spectacles an expression of strained anguish. A bloke with a secret sorrow.
    • 1931, Cab Calloway, Irving Mills, Minnie the Moocher, lyrics of 1930, 31 and 33 versions,
      She messed around with a bloke named Smoky.
    • 1958, Brendan Behan, Borstal Boy, page 281,
      It was a Cockney bloke who had never seen a cow till he came inside. Cragg said it took some blokes like that, and city fellows are the worse.
    • 2000, Elizabeth Young, Asking for Trouble, page 19,
      As her current bloke was turning out better than expected, I didn't see much of her lately.
  2. (Britain) a man who behaves in a particularly laddish or overtly heterosexual manner.
  3. (now chiefly Quebec, colloquial) An anglophone man.
  4. (Australia) An exemplar of a certain masculine, independent male archetype.
    • 2000 May 5, Belinda Luscombe, “Cinema: Of Mad Max and Madder Maximus”, Time:
      ‘The Bloke’ is a certain kind of Australian or New Zealand male. [] The Classic Bloke is not a voluble beast. His speech patterns are best described as infrequent but colorful. [] ¶ The Bloke is pragmatic rather than classy. [] ¶ Most of all, the Bloke does not whinge.

Synonyms[edit]

Coordinate terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "bloke", Online Etymology Dictionary
2. “bloke” (US) / “bloke” (UK) in Oxford Dictionaries, Oxford University Press.

Anagrams[edit]


Cebuano[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish bloque, from French bloc, from Middle French bloc (a considerable piece of something heavy, block), from Old French bloc (log, block), from Middle Dutch blok (treetrunk), from *Old Saxon blok (log), from Proto-Germanic *blukką (beam, log), from Proto-Indo-European *bhulg'-, from *bhelg'- (thick plank, beam, pile, prop).

Noun[edit]

bloke

  1. block; a substantial, often approximately cuboid, piece of any substance.