tip

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See also: Tip, TIP, tıp, típ, TİP, and tip-

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /tɪp/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪp

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English tip, typ, tippe, probably from an unrecorded Old English *typpa, *typpe, from Proto-Germanic *tuppijô, *tuppijǭ (tip), diminutive of *tuppaz (top).

Noun[edit]

tip (plural tips)

  1. The extreme end of something, especially when pointed; e.g. the sharp end of a pencil. [From 15th c.]
    • 1848, Anne Bronte, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall:
      When he woke up, about half an hour after, he called it to him again, but Dash only looked sheepish and wagged the tip of his tail.
    • 2013 June 8, “The new masters and commanders”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8839, page 52:
      From the ground, Colombo’s port does not look like much. []   But viewed from high up in one of the growing number of skyscrapers in Sri Lanka’s capital, it is clear that something extraordinary is happening: China is creating a shipping hub just 200 miles from India’s southern tip.
    the tip of one's nose
  2. A piece of metal, fabric or other material used to cover the top of something for protection, utility or decoration. [From 15th c.]
    a tip for an umbrella, a shoe, a gas burner, etc.
  3. (music) The end of a bow of a stringed instrument that is not held.
  4. (chiefly in the plural) A small piece of meat.
    chicken tips over rice, pork tips, marinated alligator tips
    • 1998, Alan Morris, Between Earth and Sky (Guardians of the North book 4; →ISBN:
      He dutifully speared a beef tip and chewed it with false gusto.
  5. A piece of stiffened lining pasted on the inside of a hat crown.
  6. A thin, boarded brush made of camel's hair, used by gilders in lifting gold leaf.
  7. Synonym of eartip (part of earbuds)
Synonyms[edit]
Hyponyms[edit]
  • (extreme end of something): tooltip
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

tip (third-person singular simple present tips, present participle tipping, simple past and past participle tipped)

  1. (transitive) To provide with a tip; to cover the tip of. [From 15th c.]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Late Middle English tippen, possibly from North Germanic/Scandinavian (compare Swedish tippa (to topple over)), or a special use of Etymology 1.

Verb[edit]

tip (third-person singular simple present tips, present participle tipping, simple past and past participle tipped)

  1. (ergative) (To cause) to become knocked over, fall down or overturn. [(transitive) From early 14th c.] [(intransitive) From earlier 16th c.]
  2. (ergative) (To cause) to be, or come to be, in a tilted or sloping position; (to cause) to become unbalanced. [From 17th c.]
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby-Dick:
      the brief suspended agony of the boat, as it would tip for an instant on the knife-like edge of the sharper waves, that almost seemed threatening to cut it in two []
    • 2019, Lawreniuk, Sabrina, “‘Hun Sen Won’t Die, Workers Will Die’: The Geopolitics of Labour in the Cambodian Crackdown”, in Dog Days: Made in China Yearbook 2018[2], ANU Press, page 217b:
      There is little chance that the EU’s watchdogs have, until now, simply missed the evidence of a deeper malaise. The red flags signalling a democratic deficit have always been prominent: from the long-standing harassment, detention, and assassination of peaceful human rights defenders like Chea Vichea, Chut Wutty, and Tep Vanny, to ratcheting up efforts to deter civil society organisation through dubious, hostile legislation. More likely, the trade-offs between popular power and stability have been weighed by the EU and accepted, where these have tipped in its favour—in this case, shoring up a regional ally and trading partner, as well as delivering rapid rates of economic growth that have won Cambodia middle-income status, thus serving up a ready exemplar of neoliberal development logic.
  3. (transitive, slang, dated) To drink. [From 18th c.]
  4. (transitive) To dump (refuse). [From 19th c.]
  5. (US, transitive) To pour a libation or a liquid from a container, particularly from a forty of malt liquor. [From 20th c.]
    • 1993, DRS, “Gangsta Lean (This Is For My Homies)”:
      I tip my 40 to your memory.
  6. (transitive) To deflect with one′s fingers, especially one′s fingertips.
    • 2011 September 28, Jon Smith, “Valencia 1 - 1 Chelsea”, in BBC Sport[3]:
      Lampard was replaced by Kalou but the substitute immediately gave the ball to Jonas, whose 25-yard curler was tipped wide by Cech.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

tip (plural tips)

  1. (skittles, obsolete) The knocking over of a skittle. [From 17th c.]
  2. An act of tipping up or tilting. [From 19th c.]
  3. (Britain, Australia, New Zealand) An area or a place for dumping something, such as rubbish or refuse, as from a mine; a heap (see tipple); a dump. [From 19th c.]
  4. (Britain, Australia, New Zealand) Rubbish thrown from a quarry.
  5. (Britain, Australia, New Zealand, by extension) A recycling centre.
  6. (colloquial) A very untidy place. [From 20th c.]
  7. The act of deflecting with one's fingers, especially the fingertips
    • 2011 October 1, Phil McNulty, “Everton 0 - 2 Liverpool”, in BBC Sport[4]:
      As a frenetic opening continued, Cahill - whose robust approach had already prompted Jamie Carragher to register his displeasure to Atkinson - rose above the Liverpool defence to force keeper Pepe Reina into an athletic tip over the top.
  8. A tram for expeditiously transferring coal.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Of uncertain origin, perhaps related to Etymology 1 and cognate with Dutch tippen, German tippen, Swedish tippa.

Verb[edit]

tip (third-person singular simple present tips, present participle tipping, simple past and past participle tipped)

  1. (now rare) To hit quickly and lightly; to tap. [From later 15th c.]

Noun[edit]

tip (plural tips)

  1. (now rare) A light blow or tap. [From later 16th c.]

Etymology 4[edit]

Originally thieves' slang, of uncertain origin; according to the OED, probably related to sense 1.

Verb[edit]

tip (third-person singular simple present tips, present participle tipping, simple past and past participle tipped)

  1. To give a small gratuity to, especially to an employee of someone who provides a service. [From early 18th c.]
    In some cities waiters must be tipped.
    • 1922, Ben Travers, chapter 2, in A Cuckoo in the Nest[5]:
      Mother [] considered that the exclusiveness of Peter's circle was due not to its distinction, but to the fact that it was an inner Babylon of prodigality and whoredom, from which every Kensingtonian held aloof, except on the conventional tip-and-run excursions in pursuit of shopping, tea and theatres.
  2. (thieves′ slang) To give, pass. [From early 17th c.]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

tip (plural tips)

  1. A gratuity; a small amount of money left for a bartender, waiter, taxi driver or other servant as a token of appreciation. [From mid-18th c.]
    • 1897, Bram Stoker, Dracula:
      A half crown tip put the deputy's knowledge at my disposal, and I learned that Mr. Bloxam [...] had left for his work at five o'clock that morning.
Descendants[edit]
  • Korean: (tip)
Translations[edit]
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 5[edit]

Probably from to tip (give, pass) or to tip (tap), or a combination of the two.

Noun[edit]

tip (plural tips)

  1. A piece of private or secret information, especially imparted by someone with expert knowledge about sporting odds, business performance etc. [From mid-19th c.]
  2. A piece of advice.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

tip (third-person singular simple present tips, present participle tipping, simple past and past participle tipped)

  1. To give a piece of private information to; to inform (someone) of a clue, secret knowledge, etc. [From later 19th c.]
    • 1987 October 1, Charles W. Murdock, “Heard It Through the Grapevine: The Future of Insider-Trading Laws”, in ABA Journal[6], volume 73, number 12, page 104 of 100–108:
      Dirks was an investment analyst who learned from a former employee of Equity Funding that the company had been fraudulently manufacturing insurance policies. Dirks tipped several institutions which then liquidated $16 million in Equity Funding stock before the fraud was exposed and the bottom fell out of the market. According to the Court, Dirks was a hero for (eventually) exposing the fraud. The SEC's censure of Dirks for tipping inside information was reversed because, the Supreme Court held, the liability of a tippee derives from that of the tipper. If the tipper is without sin, so is the tippee. Here, the employee's purpose in informing Dirks was to expose the fraud, so the tipper breached no duty. Moreover, according to the Court, for there to be a breach of duty, there must be personal benefit (in the form of pecuniary gain or reputational benefit that will translate into future earnings) arising to the tipper from the disclosure.
    • 1996, Donald C. Langevoort, “The Reform of Joint and Several Liability Under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995: Proportionate Liability, Contribution Rights and Settlement Effects”, in The Business Lawyer[7], volume 51, number 4, The American Bar Association, page 1163 of 1157–1175:
      In rare instances, the provision logically could apply to the private right of action given to contemporaneous traders to recover for insider trading (e.g., a case where an insider tipped an associate about some forthcoming corporate event, and the tippee was found liable based on recklessness).
    • 2007, Paul Irvine, Marc Lipson and Andy Puckett, “Tipping”, in The Review of Financial Studies[8], volume 20, number 3, page 755 of 741–768:
      If the institutional trading patterns we observe are a result of tipping, rather than precipitated by some other event, then we should see only a slight increase in the number of institutions active in the market (tipping would precipitate entry by, at most, the few institutions that were tipped). At the same time, given the nature of the reports, we should see an increase in the average buying activity of institutions (we cannot identify the specific institutions that were tipped, so we can only look at averages) and see little change in selling.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 6[edit]

Noun[edit]

tip (plural tips)

  1. (African-American Vernacular) A kick or phase; one's current habits or behaviour.
  2. (African-American Vernacular) A particular arena or sphere of interest; a front.

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

tip (feminine tipa, masculine plural tips, feminine plural tipes)

  1. full, as in sated or satisfied (including to excess)

Noun[edit]

tip m (plural tips)

  1. excess (of food or drink)

Cebuano[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from English tip.

Noun[edit]

tip

  1. tip (gratuity)
  2. tip; tip-off

Verb[edit]

tip

  1. to tip (give a small gratuity)
  2. to tip off (inform someone confidentially)

Etymology 2[edit]

Ellipsis for English tip sheet.

Noun[edit]

tip

  1. lottery tip sheet

Czech[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English tip.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tip m inan

  1. tip, guess

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • tip in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • tip in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch tip, ultimately from Proto-Germanic *tuppijô, *tuppijǭ (tip), a diminutive of *tuppaz.

Noun[edit]

tip m (plural tippen, diminutive tipje n)

  1. tip, extreme end of something
    Synonyms: eind, einde, end, punt, uiteinde

Hyponyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from English tip.

Noun[edit]

tip m (plural tips, diminutive tipje n)

  1. tip, small amount of money left for a waiter, taxi driver, etc. as a token of appreciation
    Synonym: fooi
  2. tip, piece of good advice
  3. hint, tip
See also[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb[edit]

tip

  1. first-person singular present indicative of tippen
  2. imperative of tippen

Anagrams[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

French type, Latin typus

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tip m (plural tipi, feminine equivalent tipă)

  1. guy

Declension[edit]

Noun[edit]

tip n (plural tipuri)

  1. prototype, model
  2. type, style

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


Sakizaya[edit]

Noun[edit]

tip

  1. east

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek τύπος (túpos, mark, impression, type).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tȋp m (Cyrillic spelling ти̑п)

  1. type
  2. (colloquial) person (usually male), guy, bloke, dude

Declension[edit]


Slovene[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tȋp m inan

  1. type

Inflection[edit]

Masculine inan., hard o-stem
nom. sing. típ
gen. sing. típa
singular dual plural
nominative típ típa típi
accusative típ típa típe
genitive típa típov típov
dative típu típoma típom
locative típu típih típih
instrumental típom típoma típi

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English tip

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tip m (plural tips)

  1. tip (advice)

Turkish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tip (definite accusative tipi, plural tipler)

  1. type
  2. (colloquial) strange or peculiar person

Declension[edit]

Inflection
Nominative tip
Definite accusative tipi
Singular Plural
Nominative tip tipler
Definite accusative tipi tipleri
Dative tipe tiplere
Locative tipte tiplerde
Ablative tipten tiplerden
Genitive tipin tiplerin
Possessive forms
Nominative
Singular Plural
1st singular tipim tiplerim
2nd singular tipin tiplerin
3rd singular tipi tipleri
1st plural tipimiz tiplerimiz
2nd plural tipiniz tipleriniz
3rd plural tipleri tipleri
Definite accusative
Singular Plural
1st singular tipimi tiplerimi
2nd singular tipini tiplerini
3rd singular tipini tiplerini
1st plural tipimizi tiplerimizi
2nd plural tipinizi tiplerinizi
3rd plural tiplerini tiplerini
Dative
Singular Plural
1st singular tipime tiplerime
2nd singular tipine tiplerine
3rd singular tipine tiplerine
1st plural tipimize tiplerimize
2nd plural tipinize tiplerinize
3rd plural tiplerine tiplerine
Locative
Singular Plural
1st singular tipimde tiplerimde
2nd singular tipinde tiplerinde
3rd singular tipinde tiplerinde
1st plural tipimizde tiplerimizde
2nd plural tipinizde tiplerinizde
3rd plural tiplerinde tiplerinde
Ablative
Singular Plural
1st singular tipimden tiplerimden
2nd singular tipinden tiplerinden
3rd singular tipinden tiplerinden
1st plural tipimizden tiplerimizden
2nd plural tipinizden tiplerinizden
3rd plural tiplerinden tiplerinden
Genitive
Singular Plural
1st singular tipimin tiplerimin
2nd singular tipinin tiplerinin
3rd singular tipinin tiplerinin
1st plural tipimizin tiplerimizin
2nd plural tipinizin tiplerinizin
3rd plural tiplerinin tiplerinin