mancia

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See also: -mancia and -mancía

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Italian mancia.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mancia

  1. tip, gratuity
    • 1963, Thomas Pynchon, (Please provide the book title or journal name), V.:
      Its landscape is one of inanimate monuments and buildings; near-inanimate barmen, taxi-drivers, bellhops, guides: there to do any bidding, to varying degrees of efficiency, on receipt of the recommended baksheesh, pourboire, mancia, tip.
    • 1980, Anthony Burgess, Earthly Powers:
      We got up and Don Carlo looked critically at the money I had left on the table. ‘That is too much. A mancia of two lire. The waiter will be dissatisfied with those who leave a smaller but more rational mancia.’ ‘You disapprove of generosity? Perhaps they will call me Don Quixote della mancia.’ Neither of them thought that funny.

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mancia f ‎(plural mance)

  1. tip (in a restaurant, etc.)

Anagrams[edit]