east

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See also: East

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English est, from Old English ēast, from Proto-Germanic *austrą, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ews-.

Compare West Frisian east, Dutch oost, German Ost, Norwegian Nynorsk aust, Swedish öst.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /iːst/, enPR: ēst
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːst

Noun[edit]

east (countable and uncountable, plural easts)

  1. One of the four principal compass points, specifically 90°, conventionally directed to the right on maps; the direction of the rising sun at an equinox. Abbreviated as E.
    Portsmouth is to the east of Southampton.
    We live in the east of the country.
    • 1895, Thomas Hardy, Jude the Obscure
      In a few hours the birds come to it from all points of the compass – east, west, north, and south []
  2. The eastern region or area; the inhabitants thereof. [circa 1300]
    • 1855, John Reynolds, My Own Times: Embracing Also the History of My Life, page 271:
      We, in the west, agreed amongst ourselves that a penitentiary should be erected with our half of the money arising as above stated; and the east agreed to improve the country in their vicinity with the other half.
  3. (ecclesiastical) In a church: the direction of the altar and chancel; the direction faced by the priest when celebrating ad orientem.
    • 2014, Paul Porwoll, Against All Odds: History of Saint Andrew's Parish Church, Charleston, 1706-2013, WestBow Press (→ISBN), page 365:
      A few [Anglican churches in South Carolina, Virginia and Maryland] are oriented other than due [geographic] east—St. Paul's, St. George's, and Prince George's parish churches face northeast and St. Andrew's, southeast. [] Throughout the book I refer directionally to the altar and chancel of St. Andrew's as situated at ecclesiastical east (to avoid overcomplicating matters), not geographical or magnetic southeast. Thus, the altar is located at the east end of the church, and the gallery, at the west.
    • 2018, Anat Geva, Modernism and American Mid-20th Century Sacred Architecture, Routledge (→ISBN)
      However, in Mies' chapel, liturgical east is magnetic west.
    • 2019, Sarah Hosking, "Coventry Cathedral", in Prickett Stephen Prickett, Edinburgh Companion to the Bible and the Arts, Edinburgh University Press (→ISBN), page 371:
      The tapestry by Graham Sutherland that occupies the whole wall of the liturgical east and geographic north of the cathedral is recognisable to the point of visual exhaustion.

Coordinate terms[edit]

northwest north northeast
west Compass rose simple plain.svg east
southwest south southeast


Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Also see Appendix:Cardinal directions for translations of all compass points

Adjective[edit]

east (not comparable)

  1. Situated or lying in or towards the east; eastward.
  2. (meteorology) Blowing (as wind) from the east.
  3. Of or pertaining to the east; eastern.
  4. From the East; oriental.
  5. (ecclesiastical) Designating, or situated in, the liturgical east.
    the east front of a cathedral
    • 2014, Paul Porwoll, Against All Odds: History of Saint Andrew's Parish Church, Charleston, 1706-2013, WestBow Press (→ISBN), page 365:
      Throughout the book I refer directionally to the altar and chancel of St. Andrew's as situated at ecclesiastical east (to avoid overcomplicating matters), not geographical or magnetic southeast. Thus, the altar is located at the east end of the church, and the gallery, at the west.
    • 2019, Sarah Hosking, "Coventry Cathedral", in Prickett Stephen Prickett, Edinburgh Companion to the Bible and the Arts, Edinburgh University Press (→ISBN), page 371:
      The tapestry by Graham Sutherland that occupies the whole wall of the liturgical east and geographic north of the cathedral is recognisable [] a huge image of Christ on the [liturgical] east end, filling the entire wall and to be visible through the [liturgical] West Window (Fig. 24.2).

Synonyms[edit]

  • (situated or lying in or towards the east): eastward
  • (meteorology: wind from the east): easterly
  • (of or pertaining to the east): eastern
  • (from the East): oriental

Antonyms[edit]

  • (situated or lying in or towards the east): westward
  • (meteorology: wind from the east): westerly
  • (of or pertaining to the east): western

Translations[edit]

Adverb[edit]

east (not comparable)

  1. towards the east; eastwards

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Anagrams[edit]


Estonian[edit]

Noun[edit]

east

  1. elative singular of iga

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *austrą, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ews- (eastern). Cognate with Old Frisian āst, Old Saxon ost, Dutch oost, Old High German ōst, German Osten, Old Norse austr. The Indo-European root is also the source of Latin auster (southerly) and aurora (dawn), Latvian austrumi (easterly), Proto-Slavic *utro.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ēast m

  1. the east

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle English: est
  • Old French: est

Adjective[edit]

ēast

  1. eastern, easterly

Declension[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ēast

  1. from the east
  2. towards the east

West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian āst, from Proto-Germanic *austrą.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

east

  1. east, eastern, easterly

Inflection[edit]

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Further reading[edit]

  • east”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Noun[edit]

east n (plural [please provide])

  1. east

Further reading[edit]

  • east”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Noun[edit]

east c (plural [please provide])

  1. east, eastern former colonies

Further reading[edit]

  • east”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011