from

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English from (from), from Old English from, fram (forward, from), from Proto-Germanic *fram (forward, from, away), from Proto-Indo-European *pr-, *pro-, *perəm-, *prom- (forth, forward), from *por- (forward, through). Cognate with Old Saxon fram (from) and Old High German fram (from), Danish frem (forth, forward), Danish fra (from), Swedish fram (forth, forward), Swedish från (from), Icelandic fram (forward, on), Icelandic frá (from), Albanian pre, prej. More at fro.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

from

  1. With the source or provenance of or at.
    this wine comes from France;  I got a letter from my brother
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 12, The Mirror and the Lamp:
      There were many wooden chairs for the bulk of his visitors, and two wicker armchairs with red cloth cushions for superior people. From the packing-cases had emerged some Indian clubs, […], and all these articles […] made a scattered and untidy decoration that Mrs. Clough assiduously dusted and greatly cherished.
    • 2013 June 29, “A punch in the gut”, The Economist, volume 407, number 8842, page 72-3: 
      Mostly, the microbiome is beneficial. It helps with digestion and enables people to extract a lot more calories from their food than would otherwise be possible. Research over the past few years, however, has implicated it in diseases from atherosclerosis to asthma to autism.
  2. With the origin, starting point or initial reference of or at.
    he had books piled from floor to ceiling;  he left yesterday from Chicago;  face away from the wall
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 8, The Celebrity:
      The humor of my proposition appealed more strongly to Miss Trevor than I had looked for, and from that time forward she became her old self again; for, even after she had conquered her love for the Celebrity, the mortification of having been jilted by him remained.
  3. With the separation, exclusion or differentiation of.
    an umbrella protects from the sun;  he knows right from wrong
    • 2013 May-June, Katrina G. Claw, “Rapid Evolution in Eggs and Sperm”, American Scientist, volume 101, number 3: 
      In plants, the ability to recognize self from nonself plays an important role in fertilization, because self-fertilization will result in less diverse offspring than fertilization with pollen from another individual.

Synonyms[edit]

  • (with the source or provenance of or at): out of

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Statistics[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Bislama[edit]

Etymology[edit]

English from

Preposition[edit]

from

  1. from
  2. Because of; on account of
    • 2008, Miriam Meyerhoff, Social lives in language--sociolinguistics and multilingual speech[1], ISBN 978-90-272-1863-6, page 344:
      Bang i wantem mi faen from mi ovaspen.


This entry has fewer than three known examples of actual usage, the minimum considered necessary for clear attestation, and may not be reliable. Bislama is subject to a special exemption for languages with limited documentation. If you speak it, please consider editing this entry or adding citations. See also Help and the Community Portal.

Danish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

from (neuter fromt, definite and plural fromme)

  1. pious; being religious in a quiet and serious way

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Germanic. Cognate with Old High German fruma (German fromm), Middle Dutch vrōme (Dutch vroom), Old Norse framr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

from

  1. bold, firm, resolute

Declension[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

from (comparative frommare, superlative frommast)

  1. pious; being religious in a quiet and serious way
  2. charitable
    en from stiftelse
    a charitable foundation, a charity

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]