devout

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English devout, devot, from Old French devot (French dévot), from Latin dēvōtus, perfect passive participle of dēvōveō. Doublet of devote.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /dɪˈvaʊt/
  • (Canada) IPA(key): /dəˈvʌʊt/
  • Rhymes: -aʊt
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

devout (comparative devouter or more devout, superlative devoutest or most devout)

  1. Devoted to religion or to religious feelings and duties; pious; extremely religious.
    • 1611 King James Bible, Acts x. 2
      a devout man, and one that feared God
    • (Can we date this quote by Rogers and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      We must be constant and devout in the worship of God.
  2. (archaic) Expressing devotion or piety.
    devout sighs; devout eyes; a devout posture
  3. Warmly devoted; hearty; sincere; earnest.
    devout wishes for one's welfare

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

devout (plural devouts)

  1. (obsolete) A devotee.
  2. (obsolete) A devotional composition, or part of a composition; devotion.

References[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French devot, devout, from Latin dēvōtus (vowed, promised).

Adjective[edit]

devout

  1. devout
    • c. 1400, Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales, General Prologue, lines 21-22:
      Redy to wenden on my pilgrymage
      To Caunterbury with ful devout corage,
      Ready to go on pilgrimage and start
      To Canterbury, full devout at heart,
  2. sacred, holy

Descendants[edit]

  • English: devout
  • Scots: devot, devote, devoit

References[edit]