devout

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English devout, devot, from Old French devot (French dévot), from Latin dēvōtus, perfect passive participle of dēvōveō. Doublet of devote.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /dɪˈvaʊt/
  • (Canada) IPA(key): /dəˈvʌʊt/
  • Rhymes: -aʊt
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

devout (comparative devouter or more devout, superlative devoutest or most devout)

  1. Devoted to religion or to religious feelings and duties; pious; extremely religious.
  2. (archaic) Expressing devotion or piety.
    devout sighs; devout eyes; a devout posture
  3. Warmly devoted; hearty; sincere; earnest.
    devout wishes for one's welfare

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

devout (plural devouts)

  1. (obsolete) A devotee.
  2. (obsolete) A devotional composition, or part of a composition; devotion.

References[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French devot, devout, from Latin dēvōtus (vowed, promised).

Adjective[edit]

devout

  1. devout
    • c. 1400, Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales, General Prologue, lines 21-22:
      Redy to wenden on my pilgrymage
      To Caunterbury with ful devout corage,
      Ready to go on pilgrimage and start
      To Canterbury, full devout at heart,
  2. sacred, holy

Descendants[edit]

  • English: devout
  • Scots: devot, devote, devoit

References[edit]