dit

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See also: dít, dît, -dit, D.I.T., and -dít

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English ditten, dütten, from Old English dyttan (to stop up, close), from Proto-Germanic *duttijaną, from *duttaz (wisp), akin to Icelandic ditta. Related to Old English dott (dot, point). More at dot.

Verb[edit]

dit (third-person singular simple present dits, present participle ditting, simple past and past participle ditted)

  1. (Britain dialectal, Northern England) To stop up; block (an opening); close (compare Scots dit).
  2. (obsolete) To close up.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dr. H. More to this entry?)
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Variant of dite.

Noun[edit]

dit (plural dits)

  1. (archaic, rare) A ditty, a little melody.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, II.vi:
      No bird, but did her shrill notes sweetly sing; / No song but did containe a louely dit: / Trees, braunches, birds, and songs were framed fit [...].
  2. (obsolete) A word; a decree.

Etymology 3[edit]

Imitative.

Noun[edit]

dit (plural dits)

  1. The spoken representation of a dot in radio and telegraph Morse code.
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Shortening.

Noun[edit]

dit (plural dits)

  1. (information theory) decimal digit

Etymology 5[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

From French dit (called)

Adjective[edit]

dit (not comparable)

  1. (Canada, obsolete) indicator of a declared surname originating from Canadian French (literally, "called")

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch dit (this), from Middle Dutch dit, from Old Dutch thit.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

dit (possessive sy)

  1. it (subject and object)
  2. this, that

See also[edit]


Aromanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin de-inter.

Preposition[edit]

dit

  1. from

Related terms[edit]


Breton[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

dit

  1. second-person singular of da

Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Provençal, from Latin digitus.

Noun[edit]

dit m (plural dits)

  1. finger

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Provençal, from Latin dictus.

Verb[edit]

dit

  1. past participle of dir

Danish[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

dit (common din, plural dine)

  1. (possessive) Neuter singular form of din

See also[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch dit, from Old Dutch thit. Cognate with German dies.

Pronunciation[edit]

Determiner[edit]

dit

  1. this (neuter); referring to a thing or a person closer by.
    dit huis
    this house
    dit kind
    this child

Inflection[edit]

Dutch demonstrative determiners
Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural
Proximal deze deze dit deze
Distal die die dat die
Possessive diens dier diens dier


Derived terms[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

dit n

  1. (demonstrative) this, this here
    Wat is dit?
    What is this?

Usage notes[edit]

This pronoun can combine with a preposition to form a pronominal adverb. When this occurs, it is changed into its adverbial/locative counterpart hier. See also Category:Dutch pronominal adverbs.


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French dit, from Latin dictus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

dit

  1. past participle of dire
    Il a dit son nom.He said his name.
  2. third-person singular present indicative of dire
    « Je m'appelle Paul, » dit-il.“My name is Paul”, he says.
  3. third-person singular past historic of dire
  4. (in names) Indicating a surname used as a family name.

Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dictus, dictum.

Verb[edit]

dit

  1. past participle of

Adjective[edit]

dit

  1. said

Noun[edit]

dit m (plural dits)

  1. saying, maxim

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Pronoun[edit]

dit

  1. this

Etymology 2[edit]

Non-lemma forms.

Determiner[edit]

dit

  1. neuter nominative and accusative singular of dese

Further reading[edit]

  • dit”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • dit”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

Norwegian[edit]

Adverb[edit]

dit

  1. to that place; thither

Occitan[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin digitus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dit m (plural dits)

  1. finger

Old French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin dictum.

Noun[edit]

dit m (oblique plural diz or ditz, nominative singular diz or ditz, nominative plural dit)

  1. word
  2. story; tale
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin dictus.

Verb[edit]

dit

  1. past participle of dire
  2. third-person singular present indicative of dire
  3. third-person singular past historic of dire
Descendants[edit]

Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Early Scots ditt or dyt, from Old English dyttan.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

dit (third-person singular present dits, present participle ditin, past ditt, past participle ditt)

  1. To close (especially of a door or mouth).
  2. To block or stop up (of an opening).
  3. To obstruct, especially from view.
  4. To darken or dim (in the sense of obscuring light).
  5. Of the sun: to sink or to be obscured by clouds.

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

dit (not comparable)

  1. there; to that place; that way, in that direction; thither
    Jag har aldrig varit i London, men jag ska dit snart.I've never been to London, but I will get there soon.

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]