mit

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: MIT, MİT, mít, mît, mīt, and mit-

Abinomn[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

mit

  1. I

Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

mit

  1. (possessive) neuter singular of min

See also[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

mit

  1. third-person singular past historic of mettre

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German mite, mit, from Old High German miti, mit, from Proto-Germanic *midi. Cognate with German Low German met, mihe- (separable part of verbs) (Paderbornisch) and Middle English mid (with).

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

mit (takes dative)

  1. with (in the company of; alongside)
    Ich spiele mit meinen Freunden.
    I'm playing with my friends.
  2. with, by (using as an instrument; by means of)
    Ich schreibe mit einem Bleistift.
    I'm writing with a pencil.
    Ich fahre mit dem Bus.
    I'm going by bus.
  3. with (as an accessory to)
  4. with (having)
  5. at (with the age of)
  6. with, including, with ... included

Usage notes[edit]

  • In older usage, Latin-derived nouns occurred in the ablative case after mit, e.g. mit dem Corpore, mit dem Nomine.

Synonyms[edit]

  • m. (abbreviation)
  • m/ (abbreviation; now very rare)

Antonyms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

mit

  1. among; denotes a belonging of a person or a thing to a group
    Weiße Leute haben die Vereinigten Staaten mit aufgebaut.
    White people helped to build up the United States.
    Hier gibt es mit das beste Essen in der Stadt.
    Here they have some of the best food in town.
    Ich war mit der erste, der hier war.
    I was one of the very first who arrived.
  2. also, too (in addition; besides; as well)
  3. (somewhat informal) with (something), with it
    Ich brauch nicht unbedingt Majonäse zu den Fritten, aber mit sind sie natürlich besser.
    I don't necessarily need mayonnaise with the chips, but they taste better with it, of course.

Derived terms[edit]

  • mittem (colloquial contraction with definite article dem)
  • mim (colloquial contraction with definite article dem; not used in standard German)

Anagrams[edit]


German Low German[edit]

Preposition[edit]

mit

  1. Alternative spelling of mid

Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

mi (what?) +‎ -t (accusative suffix)

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

mit

  1. accusative singular of mi
    Mit gondolsz?What do you think?
  2. (colloquial) why
    Mit szórakozol velem?Why (the hell) are you messing with me?

Derived terms[edit]


Hunsrik[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

mit (+ dative)

  1. with (in the company of; alongside)
    Komm mit meer.
    Come with me.
  2. with, by (using as an instrument; by means of)
    Ich schreive mit em Lappis.
    I'm writing with a pencil.
    Meer sin mim Onnibus komm.
    We came by bus.

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

  • (mit + dem) mim

External links[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Preposition[edit]

mit

  1. Alternative spelling of mid

Adjective[edit]

mit

  1. Alternative spelling of mid

Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *midi.

Preposition[edit]

mit

  1. with

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle Dutch: met
    • Dutch: met
    • Limburgish: mit

Further reading[edit]

  • mit”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old High German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *midi. Akin to Old English mid, Old Saxon mid, Old Norse með.

Preposition[edit]

mit

  1. with

Descendants[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Preposition[edit]

mit

  1. Alternative form of mid

Pennsylvania German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare German mit, Dutch met, Swedish med.

Adverb[edit]

mit

  1. along

Preposition[edit]

mit

  1. with

Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek μῦθος (mûthos, myth).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mit m inan

  1. myth

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek μῦθος (mûthos, myth).

Noun[edit]

mȋt m (Cyrillic spelling ми̑т)

  1. myth

Declension[edit]


Tocharian B[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Tocharian *ḿət(ə), from Proto-Indo-European *médʰu (mead). See also Old Chinese (OC *mit, honey), which is possibly a borrowing from Tocharian.

Noun[edit]

mit

  1. honey

Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English meat.

Noun[edit]

mit

  1. flesh, meat
    • 1989, Buk Baibel long Tok Pisin, Port Moresby: Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, 2:23:
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
This entry has fewer than three known examples of actual usage, the minimum considered necessary for clear attestation, and may not be reliable. Tok Pisin is subject to a special exemption for languages with limited documentation. If you speak it, please consider editing this entry or adding citations. See also Help and the Community Portal.

Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

mit (nominative plural mits)

  1. meat

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]