mite

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See also: mité and mitë

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English mite, from Old English mīte (mite, tiny insect), from Proto-Germanic *mītǭ (biting insect, literally cutter), from *maitaną (to cut), from Proto-Indo-European *mey- (small) or *meh₂y- (to cut). Akin to Old High German mīza (mite), Middle Dutch mīte (moth, mite), Dutch mijt (moth, mite), Danish mide (mite).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mite (plural mites)

  1. Any of many minute arachnids which, along with the ticks, comprise subclass Acarina (aka Acari).
  2. A small coin formerly circulated in England, rated at about a third of a farthing.
  3. A lepton, a small coin used in Palestine in the time of Christ.
  4. A small weight; one twentieth of a grain.
  5. (sometimes used adverbially) Anything very small; a minute object; a very little quantity or particle.
    • March 17 1903, Mark Twain, letter to Helen Keller:
      It takes a thousand men to invent a telegraph, or a steam engine, or a phonograph, or a photograph, or a telephone or any other important thing — and the last man gets the credit and we forget the others. He added his little mite — that is all he did.
    • 1913, Joseph C[rosby] Lincoln, chapter V, in Mr. Pratt’s Patients, New York, N.Y.; London: D. Appleton and Company, OCLC 35623305, OL 5535161W; republished New York, N.Y.; London: D. Appleton and Company, 1914, OCLC 37141511, pages 124–125:
      "Well," I says, "I cal'late a body could get used to Tophet if he stayed there long enough." She flared up; the least mite of a slam at Doctor Wool was enough to set her going.
    • 1956, Janice Holt Giles, chapter 8, in Hannah Fowler, Boston, Mass.: Houghton Mifflin, OCLC 937953041; republished Lexington, Ky.: University Press of Kentucky, 1992, →ISBN, page 69:
      "Silas, now," Esther Whitley had said, "would be a good one for you, Hannah. He's a mite on the old side, but he's steady, an' he's been wed before. He knows the ways of a woman better'n some."
    • 1959, Frances Cavanah, Abe Lincoln Gets His Chance, Chicago, Ill.: Rand McNally, OCLC 1039439343; Abe Lincoln Gets His Chance (ReadHowYouWant Classics Library), EasyRead large edition, U.S.A.: ReadHowYouWant, 2008, →ISBN, page 30:
      Those trousers are a mite too big, but you'll soon grow into them.
  6. (colloquial, often used affectionately) A small or naughty person, or one people take pity on; rascal.
    • 2014, Lorraine F Elli, The Little Town Mouse:
      “Tom told me that, but twasn't your fault, the little mite just couldn't wait to be born that's all.” A small smile played on Leah's lips.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

mite

  1. Eye dialect spelling of might.

Anagrams[edit]


Au[edit]

Noun[edit]

mite

  1. woman

References[edit]

  • transnewguinea.org, citing D. C. Laycock, Languages of the Lumi Subdistrict (West Sepik District), New Guinea (1968), Oceanic Linguistics, 7 (1): 36-66

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mythos.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mite m (plural mites)

  1. myth

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French, from Old French mitte (kind of insect which gnaws on cloth or cheese), from Middle Dutch mīte (moth, mite), ultimately from Proto-Germanic *mītǭ (biting insect, literally cutter), from *maitaną (to cut).

Akin to Old English mīte (mite, tiny insect), Old High German mīza (mite), Danish mide (mite).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mite f (plural mites)

  1. mite (arachnid)
  2. moth, particularly one whose larva destroys something stored by humans

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

mite

  1. inflection of miter:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mītis (mild, mature).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmi.te/
  • Rhymes: -ite
  • Hyphenation: mì‧te

Adjective[edit]

mite (plural miti)

  1. mild
  2. moderate (price)
  3. balmy, mild (climate)
    quest'anno è stato un gennaio mite
    January has been mild this year
  4. meek (animal)

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mīte

  1. nominative/accusative/vocative neuter singular of mītis

References[edit]

  • mite”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • mite”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French mitte (kind of insect which gnaws on cloth or cheese), from Middle Dutch mīte (moth, mite), ultimately from Proto-Germanic *mītǭ (biting insect, literally cutter).

Noun[edit]

mite f (plural mites)

  1. (Jersey) mite

Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

mite

  1. dative singular of mit