Christ

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See also: christ and Chríst

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English Crist, from Old English Crist, from Latin Christus, from Ancient Greek Χρῑστός (Khrīstós), proper noun use of χρῑστός (khrīstós, [the] anointed [one]), a semantic loan of Hebrew מָשִׁיחַ(māšīaḥ, anointed) or the Aramaic equivalent (whence ultimately also English messiah, also via Latin, Greek). Compare grime for the Proto-Indo-European root, *gʰr-ey- (to rub, smear; to anoint); further related to ghee.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: krīst, IPA(key): /kɹaɪst/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪst

Proper noun[edit]

Christ

  1. (Christianity) The anointed one, the Messiah predicted by the Old Testament.
  2. (Christianity) A title given to Jesus of Nazareth, seen as the fulfiller of the messianic prophecy.
    • 1925 July – 1926 May, A[rthur] Conan Doyle, “(please specify the chapter number)”, in The Land of Mist (eBook no. 0601351h.html), Australia: Project Gutenberg Australia, published April 2019:
      "But I have seen the Christ. Oh, He was glorious, glorious! Now, good-bye - good-bye!" She backed towards the cabinet and sank into the shadows.
  3. A surname.

Usage notes[edit]

Like God, Mom, etc., Christ is usually used directly in the manner of a name. However, it is sometimes used with a definite article—the Christ—in archaic or learned settings to emphasize its nature as a title equivalent to the Anointed One. When used as a title for Jesus, it is almost always applied as a postpositive: Jesus Christ.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Noun[edit]

Christ (plural Christs)

  1. (art) A figure or other artistic depiction of Jesus Christ.

Translations[edit]

Interjection[edit]

Christ

  1. An expletive.

Usage notes[edit]

Use as a standalone expletive is considered blasphemous by some Christians.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

East Central German[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Christ

  1. (Erzgebirgisch) a diminutive of the male given name Christoph
  2. (Erzgebirgisch) a diminutive of the female given name Christa and Christine.

Further reading[edit]

  • 2020 June 11, Hendrik Heidler, Hendrik Heidler's 400 Seiten: Echtes Erzgebirgisch: Wuu de Hasen Hoosn haaßn un de Hosen Huusn do sei mir drhamm: Das Original Wörterbuch: Ratgeber und Fundgrube der erzgebirgischen Mund- und Lebensart: Erzgebirgisch – Deutsch / Deutsch – Erzgebirgisch[1], 3. geänderte Auflage edition, Norderstedt: BoD – Books on Demand, →ISBN, →OCLC, page 29:

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Middle French Christ, borrowed from Latin Christus, from Ancient Greek Χριστός (Khristós), proper noun use of χριστός (khristós, the anointed one), a calque of Hebrew מָשִׁיחַ(māšīaḥ, anointed) or the Aramaic equivalent (whence ultimately also English messiah, also via Latin, Greek).

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Christ m

  1. Christ

Related terms[edit]

German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle High German kriste, kristen, from Old High German kristāni, from Latin Christianus, derived from the forms in etymology 2 below.

Noun[edit]

Christ m (weak, genitive Christen, plural Christen, feminine Christin)

  1. (Christianity) a Christian
    • 1888, Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche, Der Antichrist, § 58:
      Nihilist und Christ: das reimt sich, das reimt sich nicht bloss.
      Nihilist and Christian: they rhyme [in fact], they do not merely rhyme [phonetically].
Usage notes[edit]
  • This is a weak noun in the standard language, but is part of a group of nouns which have a strong tendency to be strong colloquially, so one might hear dem Christ instead of dem Christen.
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle High German and Old High German Krist, from Latin Christus, from Ancient Greek Χριστός (Khristós), a calque of Hebrew מָשִׁיחַ(māšīaḥ, anointed) and/or its Aramaic equivalent ܡܫܺܝܚܳܐ‎‎ (whence also German Messias).

Proper noun[edit]

Christ m (proper noun, strong, genitive Christs)

  1. (archaic, now only poetic) Alternative form of Christus (Christ)
    • (Can we date this quote?) Christian song Christ ist erstanden:
      Christ ist erstanden von der Marter alle. Des solln wir alle froh sein; Christ will unser Trost sein. Kyrieleis.
      Christ is risen from all torment. Therefore we should all be happy; Christ will be our comfort. Kyrie eleison.
Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Christ” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache
  • Christ” in Uni Leipzig: Wortschatz-Lexikon
  • Christ” in Duden online
  • Christ on the German Wikipedia.Wikipedia de

Middle English[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Christ

  1. Alternative form of Crist

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin Christus from Ancient Greek Χριστός (Khristós), proper noun use of χριστός (khristós, the anointed one).

Proper noun[edit]

Christ m

  1. Christ

Descendants[edit]

  • French: Christ

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin Christus, from Ancient Greek Χριστός (Khristós), proper noun use of χριστός (khristós, the anointed one).

Proper noun[edit]

Christ m

  1. (Jersey, Christianity) Christ

Old Irish[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Christ

  1. Alternative spelling of Chríst: lenited form of Crist.

Scots[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Christ

  1. Christ

Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Christ m

  1. aspirate mutation of Crist (Christ)

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
Crist Grist Nghrist Christ
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.