Jesus

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See also: JEsus, Jesús, Jésus, Jèsus, and jesus

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English Jhesus, Iesus, from Latin Iēsūs, from Ancient Greek Ἰησοῦς (Iēsoûs), from Biblical Hebrew יֵשׁוּעַ(yēšū́aʿ), a contracted form of יְהוֹשֻׁעַ(yəhōšúaʿ, Joshua). The form יֵשׁוּעַ(yēšū́aʿ) is attested in some of the later books of the Hebrew Bible (Ezra–Nehemiah), and translated as Jeshua or Yeshua in some English editions (the former appearing in the King James Version). The Greek texts make no distinction between Jesus and Joshua, referring to them both as Ἰησοῦς (Iēsoûs).

In the Wycliffe Bible (Middle English), the forms used are Jhesus and Jhesu.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Jesus of Nazareth) enPR: jē'zəs, IPA(key): /ˈdʒiːzəs/, /ˈdʒiːzʌs/
    • (file)
  • (Spanish given name) enPR: hāso͞os', heso͞os', IPA(key): /heɪˈsuːs/, /hɛsˈuːs/
  • Rhymes: -iːzəs, -iːzʌs, -uːs

Proper noun[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Jesus

  1. Jesus of Nazareth, a religious figure whom Christians consider to be the son of God and call "Jesus Christ" in the belief that he is the Messiah, and whom Muslims believe to be a prophet.
    • 1621 June 19, William Laud, “Sermon preached before His Majesty”, in Seven Sermons Preached Upon Severall Occasions […][1], page 10:
      For the Son of God, Christ Jesus, is Head of the Church; and can the Body doe any thing well, if the Head direct it not?
    • 1873, Syed Ameer Ali, A Critical Examination of the Life and Teachings of Mohammed[2], page 195:
      Mohammed always announced his religion as the religion of Abraham, of Moses, and of Jesus.
    • 2018 March 18, John Oliver, “Mike Pence”, in Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, season 5, episode 5, HBO:
      She’s right! Omarosa is right there! Also, I’m pretty sure the original titles of the the New and Old Testament were Jesus Said This and Jesus Ain’t Say That.
  2. (historical, religion) One of a variety of persons or entities in western Manichaeism, of whom some correspond closely to the Christian conception of Jesus of Nazareth.
  3. A male given name from Spanish in Spanish culture; an anglicized spelling of Jesús.
    • 1971 Ruth Rendell, No More Dying Then, Random House (2009), →ISBN, page 195:
      Frensham opened the door and called a name that sounded like 'Haysus'. Brandy was brought and various other bottles and decanters. When the manservant had gone, Frensham said, 'Odd, aren't they, the Spanish? Calling a boy Jesus.'
  4. A male given name from Aramaic of Semitic origin.
    Jesus son of Sirach wrote the "Wisdom of Sirach"

Usage notes[edit]

  • The possessive of the Jesus may be either Jesus’s (pronounced with three syllables) or Jesus’ (pronounced with two syllables). The latter form was traditionally more common when referring to the Christian figure while the former is more common when referring to other people named Jesus, but both forms are attested in both cases. See -'s.

Coordinate terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

Jesus (plural Jesuses)

  1. The Christian savior.
    • 1813, William Revell Moody (ed.), Record of Christian Work, p 441
      And, says George Eliot, and all who believe in her teaching, it is perfectly true that He is with us now in a dumb, vague, blessed impulse. Is that your Jesus? If I may recall my illustration of the train, I will tell you of my Jesus.
    • 2005, Scot McKnight, Jesus and His Death, p152
      ...leading Dom Crossan at times to the witty criticism that modern Jesus books are in a quest for who can say "my Jesus is more Jewish than your Jesus"...
    • 2001, Clinton Bennett, In Search of Jesus, p231
      Your Jesus is my Jesus' greatest enemy

Interjection[edit]

Jesus

  1. An exclamation, the use of which is considered blasphemous among some Christians.
    Jesus, that was close!

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

Jesus (third-person singular simple present Jesuses, present participle Jesusing, simple past and past participle Jesused)

  1. (colloquial, often derogatory or humorous) To subject to (excessive) Christian proselytizing, preaching, or moralizing.
    • 1971, Richard Sale, For the president's eyes only, →ISBN, page 72:
      From what I gathered, his mother had been heavily Jesused, and his father had been a rough sort of plainsman.
    • 1994, Hannah Yakin, Of Tortoises and Other Jews, page 19:
      "If you don't believe me, ask Jesus!" [...] “Look here,” Papa burst out, “there's no difference between Jews and non-Jews. There can only be a difference between good and bad people.” “And don't start Jesusing me in my own house,” Mama added[.]
    • 2004, José Joaquín Fernández de Lizardi, ‎David L. Frye, The Mangy Parrot, page 531:
      Don't leave me until I expire; I wouldn't want some devout man or woman to come in here and start Jesusing me with the Ramillete [a collection of prayers] or some collection like that,
    • 2005, Christian Bauman, Voodoo Lounge: A Novel, page 58:
      They took refuge in Jérémie, the last Haitian port they hadn't been ejected out of, run from, or Jesused to death [in].
    • 2008, Laura Pedersen, The Big Shuffle: A Novel, →ISBN:
      In the past few weeks he's Jesused us all up with a full-length grace at each meal[.]
  2. To exclaim "Jesus" (at).
    • 2012, Brian Evenson, Windeye, →ISBN:
      The other man stumbled up, rubbing his temple. “Jesus,” the man said. Frank raised his fist, then saw that the man was Jesusing not him but [the window].
    • 2016, Kaui Hart Hemmings, Juniors, →ISBN, page 141:
      "Jesus, Whit," Will says. [...] "Why are you always Jesusing me?" He doesn't answer, just chews his food, and I take another sip[.]

See also[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch Jezus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Jesus

  1. Jesus

Cebuano[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Spanish Jesús.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: je‧sus

Proper noun[edit]

Jesus

  1. a male given name

Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek Ἰησοῦς (Iēsoûs), from Hebrew ישוע(yeshúa). See also Josva.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Jesus m

  1. Jesus

Declension[edit]

Singular
Indefinite
Nominative Jesus
Accusative Jesus
Dative Jesusi
Genitive Jesus, Jesusar, Jesu

Derived terms[edit]


German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: Je‧sus
  • IPA(key): /ˈjeːzʊs/
  • (file)

Proper noun[edit]

Jesus m (genitive Jesu or Jesus')

  1. (Christianity) Jesus

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Proper noun[edit]

Jēsūs m sg (irregular, genitive Jēsū); fourth declension

  1. Alternative form of Iēsūs: Jesus

Declension[edit]

Fourth-declension noun (highly irregular), singular only.

Case Singular
Nominative Jēsūs
Genitive Jēsū
Dative Jēsū
Accusative Jēsum
Ablative Jēsū
Vocative Jēsū

References[edit]


Middle High German[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Latin Jesus

Proper noun[edit]

Jēsus m

  1. Jesus
    • c. 1230, Wolfdietrich, MS H, 2nd half 15th c., in: Friedr. Heinr. von der Hagen, Heldenbuch. Altdeutsche Heldenlieder aus dem Sagenkreise Dietrichs von Bern und der Nibelungen. Meist aus einzigen Handschriften zum erstenmal gedruck oder hergestellt. Erster Band, Leipzig, 1855, p. 235:
      [...] wiltu gelauben an Jesum, den lieben herren mein [...]
    • 13th century, David von Augsburg. In: Franz Pfeiffer (editor), Deutsche Mystiker des vierzehnten Jahrhunderts. Erster Band, Leipzig, 1845, p. 363, line 30f. Also quoted in: Georg Friedrich Benecke, Wilhelm Müller, Mittelhochdeutsches Wörterbuch. Erster Band. A – L, Leipzig, 1854, p. 271 (see "wallebruoder, walbruoder"):
      Got lieber hêrre Jêsu Kriste, unser getriuwer geverte in dirre wüeste und unser lieber wallebruoder in diesem ellende, bringe uns [...]
    • first half of the 14th century, Nicolaus/Nikolaus von Straßburg, a sermon, in: Franz Joseph Mone (editor), Anzeiger für Kunde der teutschen Vorzeit. Siebenter Jahrgang (text from Pfälzer Hs. [Handschrift] Nr. 641 Bl. 63, b. bis zu Ende), Karlsruhe, 1838, p. 273:
      O min lieber herre Jesu Christe

Declension[edit]

This entry needs an inflection-table template.

See also[edit]


Norwegian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /jeːsʉs/, [ˈjeː.sʉs]

Proper noun[edit]

Jesus (genitive Jesu)

  1. Jesus

See also[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Relatinised from Old Portuguese Jesu, from Latin Iēsus, from Ancient Greek Ἰησοῦς (Iēsoûs), from Hebrew ישוע(y'hoshúa).

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Jesus m

  1. (Christianity) Jesus Christ

Proper noun[edit]

Jesus f or m

  1. A male given name
  2. A female given name, shortened from "Maria de Jesus"
  3. A surname​.

Quotations[edit]

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:Jesus.


Scots[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Jesus

  1. Jesus

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin Iēsus, from Ancient Greek Ἰησοῦς (Iēsoûs), from Biblical Hebrew יֵשׁוּעַ(yēšū́aʿ), a contracted form of יְהוֹשֻׁעַ(yəhōšúaʿ, Joshua). The form יֵשׁוּעַ(yēšū́aʿ) is attested in some of the later books of the Hebrew Bible (Ezra–Nehemiah). The Greek texts make no distinction between Jesus and Joshua, referring to them both as Ἰησοῦς (Iēsoûs).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /²jeːsɵs/, /ˈjeːsɵs/

Proper noun[edit]

Jesus c (genitive Jesus, sometimes Jesu)

  1. Jesus

Usage notes[edit]

  • The genitive form is Jesus in everyday speech, but especially in fixed expressions, the Greek-Latin genitive Jesu is often used, e.g. Jesu uppståndelse (”Resurrection of Jesus”), Jesu lärjungar (”Jesus’ disciples”) or Jesu lidande (”Jesus’ suffering”), etc. Compare the usage of Kristi and Kristus.
  • In older religious texts and in hymns, the form Jesu is also found as a vocative, and more rarely the object form Jesum, although these have generally been replaced by Jesus in modern adaptations.

References[edit]