sine

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See also: Sine, Síne, Sìne, and sìne

English[edit]

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Wikipedia

Sine function

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sinus, translation of Arabic جَيْب ‎(jayb).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sine ‎(plural sines)

  1. (trigonometry, mathematics) In a right triangle, the ratio of the length of the side opposite an angle to the length of the hypotenuse.

Usage notes[edit]

In various branches of mathematics, the sine of an angle is determined in various ways, including the following:

  • The y-coordinate of the point on the unit circle at the given anticlockwise angle from the x-axis.
  • The sum of the real or complex power series

         

    where x is in radians.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /siːnə/, [ˈsiːnə], [ˌsiːnə]

Pronoun[edit]

sine

  1. plural of sin

See also[edit]


Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish sine, siniu, comparative form of sen ‎(old).

Adjective[edit]

sine

  1. comparative degree of sean: older

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Irish sine ‎(teat, dug, pap), from Proto-Celtic *sɸenyo-, from Proto-Indo-European *pstḗn. Cognate with Old Norse speni ‎(teat), English spean ‎(teat (of a cow)).

Noun[edit]

sine f ‎(genitive singular sine, nominative plural siní)

  1. nipple
Declension[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
sine shine
after "an", tsine
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  • "sine" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • 1 sine” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.
  • 3 sine” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Preposition[edit]

sine

  1. (with ablative) without
    Sum sine regno.
    I am without a kingdom.

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Portuguese: sem
  • Spanish: sin

References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

sine

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of sinō

Neapolitan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈsinɛ/, /ˈsinɐ/

Particle[edit]

sine

  1. yes

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse sínir.

Pronunciation[edit]

Determiner[edit]

sine pl

  1. plural of sin

References[edit]

  • “sin” in The Bokmål Dictionary / The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse sínir.

Pronunciation[edit]

Determiner[edit]

sine pl

  1. plural of sin

References[edit]


Old French[edit]

Noun[edit]

sine m ‎(oblique plural sines, nominative singular sines, nominative plural sine)

  1. Alternative form of cisne

Noun[edit]

sine m ‎(oblique plural sines, nominative singular sines, nominative plural sine)

  1. Alternative form of signe

Romanian[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Latin , as with mine, tine.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

sine ‎(stressed reflexive-accusative form of el, ea, ei, and ele)

  1. (direct object, preceded by preposition, such as "pe", "cu", "la", or "pentru") himself, herself, itself, themselves

Synonyms[edit]

  • se (unstressed form)

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish sine ‎(teat, dug, pap), from Proto-Celtic *sɸenyo-, from Proto-Indo-European *pstḗn. Cognate with Old Norse speni ‎(teat), English spean ‎(teat (of a cow)).

Noun[edit]

sine f ‎(genitive singular sine, plural sinean)

  1. (anatomy) nipple, teat

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowing from English gin.

Noun[edit]

sine f

  1. gin (drink)

Etymology 3[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions.

Adjective[edit]

sine

  1. comparative degree of sean