tine

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See also: Tine and ține

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English tine, alteration of Middle English tinde, tind, from Old English tind, from Proto-Germanic *tindaz. Cognate with German Zinne. Compare also the related English tind.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tine (plural tines)

  1. A spike or point on an implement or tool, especially a prong of a fork or a tooth of a comb.
    • 1969, Maya Angelou, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, New York: Bantam, 1971, Chapter 9, pp. 45-46,[1]
      Sitting at the table one day, I held the fork in my left hand and pierced a piece of fried chicken. I put the knife through the second tine, as we had been strictly taught, and began to saw against the bone.
  2. A small branch, especially on an antler or horn.
  3. (dialectal) A wild vetch or tare.
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Unknown origin, possibly related to etymology 1.

Alternative forms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

tine (comparative tiner, superlative tinest)

  1. small, diminutive

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

See teen (affliction).

Noun[edit]

tine

  1. (obsolete) Trouble; distress; teen.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene:
      As wither'd Weed through cruel Winter's Tine

Etymology 4[edit]

See tind.

Verb[edit]

tine (third-person singular simple present tines, present participle tining, simple past and past participle tined)

  1. To kindle; to set on fire.
    • 1700, John Dryden, The First Book of Homer's Ilias:
      The priest with holy hands was seen to tine / The cloven wood, and pour the ruddy wine.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene:
      Coals of contention and hot vengeance tin'd.
  2. (obsolete) To rage; to smart.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene:
      Ne was there salve, ne was there medicine, / That mote recure their wounds; so inly they did tine.

Etymology 5[edit]

From Old English tȳnan, from tūn (enclosure) (modern town).

Verb[edit]

tine (third-person singular simple present tines, present participle tining, simple past and past participle tined)

  1. To shut in, or enclose.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)

Derived terms[edit]

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for tine in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Anagrams[edit]


Aromanian[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

tine

  1. Alternative form of tini

Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish teine, from Proto-Celtic *teɸnets (fire) (compare Breton and Cornish tan, Welsh tân).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tine f (genitive singular tine or tineadh, nominative plural tinte or tintreacha)

  1. fire

Declension[edit]

Standard inflection (fourth declension):

Alternative inflection (fifth declension):

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
tine thine dtine
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • "tine" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • 1 teine” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.
  • “teine” in Foclóir Gaeḋilge agus Béarla, Irish Texts Society, 1st ed., 1904, by Patrick S. Dinneen, page 730.
  • Entries containing “tine” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “tine” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

tine

  1. vocative singular of tinus

Middle English[edit]

Determiner[edit]

tine (subjective pronoun þou)

  1. (chiefly Northern and northern East Midland dialectal) Alternative form of þin.

Pronoun[edit]

tine (subjective þou)

  1. (chiefly Northern and northern East Midland dialectal) Alternative form of þin.

References[edit]


Norwegian[edit]

Verb[edit]

tine

  1. thaw

Noun[edit]

tine m

  1. Traditional bentwood box

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin , as with mine, sine.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

tine (stressed accusative form of tu)

  1. (direct object, preceded by preposition, such as "pe", "cu", "la", or "pentru") you
    te iubesc pe tine - I love you

Related terms[edit]

  • te (unstressed form)

See also[edit]