tine

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English[edit]

The tines of a fork (1)

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English tine, alteration of Middle English tinde, tind, from Old English tind, from Proto-West Germanic *tind, Proto-Germanic *tindaz. Cognate with Saterland Frisian Tiende, Tiene (prong, tine), German Zind, Zint (prong). Compare also the related English tind and German Zinne.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tine (plural tines)

  1. A spike or point on an implement or tool, especially a prong of a fork or a tooth of a comb.
    • 1920, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Tarzan the Untamed:
      The tines of the fork were quite evidently of iron or steel, the girl did not know which, while the handle and the spoon were of the same material as the smaller vessels.
    • 1969, Maya Angelou, chapter 9, in I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, New York: Bantam, published 1971, pages 45–46:
      Sitting at the table one day, I held the fork in my left hand and pierced a piece of fried chicken. I put the knife through the second tine, as we had been strictly taught, and began to saw against the bone.
  2. A small branch, especially on an antler or horn.
    • 1820, Walter Scott, chapter XXVII, in Ivanhoe; a Romance. [], volumes (please specify |volume=I to III), Edinburgh: [] Archibald Constable and Co.; London: Hurst, Robinson, and Co. [], →OCLC:
      “I answer not the challenge of my prisoner,” said Front-de-Bœuf; “nor shalt thou, Maurice de Bracy.—Giles,” he continued, “hang the franklin’s glove upon the tine of yonder branched antlers: []
    • 1891, A[rthur] Conan Doyle, The White Company, New York, N.Y., Boston, Mass.: Thomas Y[oung] Crowell & Company [], →OCLC:
      “By my faith, sirs,” he continued, half turning in his saddle to address his escort, “unless my woodcraft is sadly at fault, it is a stag of six tines and the finest that we have roused this journey.
  3. (dialect) A wild vetch or tare.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Unknown, possibly related to etymology 1.

Alternative forms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

tine (comparative tiner, superlative tinest)

  1. small, diminutive
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

See teen (affliction).

Noun[edit]

tine

  1. (obsolete) Trouble; distress; teen.[1]

Etymology 4[edit]

See tind.

Verb[edit]

tine (third-person singular simple present tines, present participle tining, simple past and past participle tined)

  1. (obsolete) To kindle; to set on fire.[1]
  2. (obsolete) To rage; to smart.[1]

Etymology 5[edit]

From Middle English tynen, from Old English tȳnan, from tūn (enclosure) (modern town).

Verb[edit]

tine (third-person singular simple present tines, present participle tining, simple past and past participle tined)

  1. (archaic) To shut in, or enclose.[1]
    • 1852, Alfred the Great, translated by Alfred Committee, The Whole Works of King Alfred the Great, volume II, page 388:
      When I was then surrounded on every side by the fiends, and tined about by the blindness of the darkness, then hove I my eyes up and looked hither and yond, whether any help were to come to me, that I might be rescued; []
    • 1874, Thomas Hardy, Far from the Madding Crowd. [], volumes (please specify |volume=I or II), London: Smith, Elder & Co., [], →OCLC:
      “Terrible trying,” said Oak. “I’ve been wet through twice a-day, either in snow or rain, this last fortnight. Cainy and I haven’t tined our eyes to-night.”
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Aromanian[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

tine

  1. Alternative form of tini

Cypriot Arabic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Arabicتِينَة(tīna).

Noun[edit]

tine f (plural tinát)

  1. fig tree

References[edit]

  • Borg, Alexander (2004) A Comparative Glossary of Cypriot Maronite Arabic (Arabic–English) (Handbook of Oriental Studies; I.70), Leiden and Boston: Brill, page 178

Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish teine,[1] from Proto-Celtic *teɸnets, from Proto-Indo-European *tep- (hot).[2]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tine f (genitive singular tine or tineadh, nominative plural tinte or tintreacha)

  1. fire

Declension[edit]

Standard inflection (fourth declension):

Alternative inflection (fifth declension):

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
tine thine dtine
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  1. ^ G. Toner, M. Ní Mhaonaigh, S. Arbuthnot, D. Wodtko, M.-L. Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “1 teine”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  2. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009), “tefnet-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, page 375
  3. ^ Sjoestedt, M. L. (1931) Phonétique d’un parler irlandais de Kerry (in French), Paris: Librairie Ernest Leroux, § 104, page 57
  4. ^ Quiggin, E. C. (1906) A Dialect of Donegal, Cambridge University Press, § 111, page 44

Further reading[edit]

Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

tīne

  1. vocative singular of tīnus

Middle English[edit]

Determiner[edit]

tine (subjective pronoun þou)

  1. (chiefly Northern and northern East Midland dialectal) Alternative form of þin (thy)

Pronoun[edit]

tine (subjective þou)

  1. (chiefly Northern and northern East Midland dialectal) Alternative form of þin (thine)

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse þíðna.

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

tine (present tense tinar/tiner, past tense tina/tinte, past participle tina/tint, passive infinitive tinast, present participle tinande, imperative tine/tin)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) to thaw

Etymology 2[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Through French from Latin tina (wine-vessel). Akin to Danish tejne.

Noun[edit]

tine f (definite singular tina, indefinite plural tiner, definite plural tinene)

  1. a traditional bentwood box

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Norse tína.

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

tine (present tense tiner, past tense tinte, past participle tint, passive infinitive tinast, present participle tinande, imperative tin)

  1. to pluck or rattle to remove fish from a fishing net
  2. to remove the awn from the grain
  3. to extract a nut from its shell

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

tine

  1. inflection of tinir:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Latin , as with mine, sine.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

tine (stressed accusative form of tu)

  1. (direct object, preceded by preposition, such as pe, cu, la, or pentru) you
    te iubesc pe tine
    I love you

Related terms[edit]

  • te (unstressed form)

See also[edit]

Yola[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English tynen, from Old English tȳnan.

Verb[edit]

tine

  1. to shut, close
    • 1867, GLOSSARY OF THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY:
      Tine a dher.
      Close the door.

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 72