rage

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See also: Rage and ragé

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

Old French rage (French: rage), from Vulgar Latin *rabia, from Latin rabies (anger, fury).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɹeɪdʒ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪdʒ

Noun[edit]

rage (countable and uncountable, plural rages)

  1. Violent uncontrolled anger.
    • 1879, R[ichard] J[efferies], chapter 1, in The Amateur Poacher, London: Smith, Elder, & Co., [], OCLC 752825175:
      They burned the old gun that used to stand in the dark corner up in the garret, close to the stuffed fox that always grinned so fiercely. Perhaps the reason why he seemed in such a ghastly rage was that he did not come by his death fairly. Otherwise his pelt would not have been so perfect. And why else was he put away up there out of sight?—and so magnificent a brush as he had too.
  2. A current fashion or fad.
    Miniskirts were all the rage back then.
  3. (obsolete) Any vehement passion.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

rage (third-person singular simple present rages, present participle raging, simple past and past participle raged)

  1. (intransitive) To act or speak in heightened anger.
  2. (intransitive, sometimes figuratively) To move with great violence, as a storm etc.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book 6”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: [] [Samuel Simmons], [], OCLC 228722708; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, OCLC 230729554:
      The madding wheels / Of brazen chariots raged; dire was the noise.
    • 1892, James Yoxall, chapter 5, in The Lonely Pyramid:
      The desert storm was riding in its strength; the travellers lay beneath the mastery of the fell simoom. [] Roaring, leaping, pouncing, the tempest raged about the wanderers, drowning and blotting out their forms with sandy spume.
    • 1922, Virginia Woolf, Jacob's Room Chapter 1
      "The two women murmured over the spirit-lamp, plotting the eternal conspiracy of hush and clean bottles while the wind raged and gave a sudden wrench at the cheap fastenings.
    • 2012 October 31, David M. Halbfinger, "[1]," New York Times (retrieved 31 October 2012):
      Though the storm raged up the East Coast, it has become increasingly apparent that New Jersey took the brunt of it.
    • 2014 June 24, “Google Glass go on sale in the UK for £1,000”, in The Guardian:
      Debate has raged over whether Glass and smartglasses like it have any viable real-world use cases for consumers, or are more interesting to businesses where workers need hands-free access to information.
  3. (obsolete) To enrage.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /raːɣə/, [ˈʁɑːʊ]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse raka, from Proto-Germanic *rakōną, cognate with Swedish raka, English rake. Related to *rekaną (to pile) and *rakjaną (to stretch).

Verb[edit]

rage (past tense ragede, past participle raget)

  1. to scrape
  2. (dated) to shave
    Synonym: barbere
Inflection[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Low German rāken (to hit, reach), from Proto-Germanic *rakōną, cognate with Dutch raken (Swedish råka is also borrowed from Low German). Probably related ot the previous verb.

Verb[edit]

rage (past tense ragede, past participle raget)

  1. (transitive, usually negated) to concern, to be of (someone's) business
  2. (transitive) to not concern, to not be any of (someone's) business
    • 1967, Christian Kampmann, Sammen, Gyldendal A/S (→ISBN)
      Men det rager mig, hvad folk siger .
    • 2007, Jonas T. Bengtsson, Submarino, Art People (→ISBN)
      “Det rager mig, hvad hun har lyst til.”
Inflection[edit]

References[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From German ragen (to jut, stick out), from Proto-Germanic *hragōną, cognate with Old English oferhragan.

Verb[edit]

rage (past tense ragede, past participle raget)

  1. to jut, stick out, stand out
Inflection[edit]
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References[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Middle French rage, from Old French rage, from Vulgar Latin *rabia.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rage f or m (plural rages)

  1. craze, fad, fashion.

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Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French rage, from Vulgar Latin *rabia, from Latin rabies.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rage f (plural rages)

  1. rage (fury, anger)
    • 1813, Les Attraits de la Morale, Ou la Vertu Parée de Tous Ses Charmes, et l'Art de rendre Heureux ceux qui nous entourent, page 179.
      [] , disoit St. Chrysostôme, [] Un homme en colère se punit le premier, en s'élevant et combattant contre lui-même, et s'enflammant de rage.”
      " [] , Saint Chrysostom says, [] An angered man punishes himself in the first place, rising and fighting against himself, and catching fire from rage."
  2. rabies (disease)
    • 1935, Revista da produção animal, Instituto de Biologia Animal, page 47.
      Les chauves-souris Desmodus Rotundus infectéés naturellement transmettent la rage aux animaux.
      The naturally infected bats Desmodus rotundus transmit rabies to animals.

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Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Verb[edit]

rage

  1. inflection of ragen:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I
    3. singular imperative

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French rage, from Vulgar Latin *rabia, from Latin rabiēs (anger, fury).

Noun[edit]

rage f (plural rages)

  1. (Jersey) rabies

Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

rage f (oblique plural rages, nominative singular rage, nominative plural rages)

  1. rage; ire; fury

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin, Late Latin ragere. Compare French raire, réer; cf. also French railler, Italian ragliare.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

a rage (third-person singular present rage, past participle not used3rd conj.

  1. (of animals) to roar, howl, bellow
Conjugation[edit]

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