fad

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See also: FAD, fàd, fād, fäd, and fád

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Of English dialectal origin. Further origin obscure. Possibly from Old English ġefæd (order, decorum) (compare Old English ġefæd (orderly, tidy), fadian, ġefadian (to set in order, arrange), whence Middle English faden (to arrange)); or from French fadaise ("a trifling thought"; see fadaise).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fæd/
    • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æd

Noun[edit]

fad (plural fads)

  1. A phenomenon that becomes popular for a very short time.
    • 2004, Andre R. Young, “Encore”, in Encore:
      You're a fad, that means you're something that we've already had, but once you're gone, you don't come back.
    • 2010, Eric J. Cesal, Down Detour Road: An Architect in Search of Practice, page 134:
      The pet rock fad was started by an advertising executive named Gary Dahl. The premise was simple: take ordinary rocks, glue eyes on them, and market them as pets.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Bavarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French fade (tasteless), from Vulgar Latin *fatidus, blend of Latin fatuus and vapidus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fad (comparative fader, superlative åm fadestn)

  1. vapid, flavourless, bland
  2. boring, bored

Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From French fade, from Late Latin *fatidus, a blend of Latin fatuus (foolish) and vapidus (vapid).

Adjective[edit]

fad (neuter fad or fadt, plural and definite singular attributive fade)

  1. insipid, bland, slightly nauseating
  2. (figuratively) flat, insipid, vapid

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse fat (vat, vessel, luggage, clothing).

Noun[edit]

fad n (singular definite fadet, plural indefinite fade)

  1. basin, bowl, dish
  2. barrel, cask, vat
Inflection[edit]

German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • fade (predominant in the northern half of Germany)

Etymology[edit]

From French fade (tasteless).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fad (strong nominative masculine singular fader, comparative fader, superlative am fadesten or am fadsten)

  1. (predominant in southern Germany and Austria) vapid, flavourless, bland
    Synonyms: schal, langweilig, geschmacklos
    Das Essen schmeckt fad.The food tastes bland.
  2. (by extension) boring, bored
    Synonym: langweilig
    Das war ein fader Film.That was a boring film.
    Mir ist so fad.I am so bored.

Declension[edit]

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish fot.[1] Compare Scottish Gaelic fad.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fad m (genitive singular faid, nominative plural faid)

  1. length

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
fad fhad bhfad
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dinneen, Patrick S. (1904), “fad”, in Foclóir Gaeḋilge agus Béarla, 1st edition, Dublin: Irish Texts Society, page 289
  2. ^ Finck, F. N. (1899) Die araner mundart (in German), volume II, Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, page 101
  3. ^ Quiggin, E. C. (1906) A Dialect of Donegal, Cambridge University Press, page 96

Further reading[edit]

Luxembourgish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French fade.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fad (masculine faden, neuter fad, comparative méi fad, superlative am faadsten)

  1. bland, insipid, tasteless
  2. dull, boring, bland

Declension[edit]

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French fade.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fad m or n (feminine singular fadă, masculine plural fazi, feminine and neuter plural fade)

  1. tasteless, flavorless, insipid
    Synonyms: searbăd, insipid, fără gust

Declension[edit]

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish fot, from Proto-Celtic *wazdos, which could be from the same root as *wāstos (empty).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fad m (genitive singular faid or faide)

  1. length
  2. distance
  3. duration

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Determiner[edit]

fad

  1. all, whole
    A bheil sibh fad an latha ann?
    Have you been there all the day?

Mutation[edit]

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
fad fhad
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

Volapük[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fad (nominative plural fads)

  1. thread

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Yola[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

fad

  1. Alternative form of faade
    • DR. RUSSELL ON THE INHABITANTS AND DIALECT OF THE BARONY OF FORTH:
      Fad didn'st thou cum t' ouz on zum other dey?

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 131