fada

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: fādá

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Irish fada (long). Doublet of vast.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɑːdə/
  • Hyphenation: fa‧da

Noun[edit]

fada (plural fadas)

  1. The acute accent as used in Irish orthography to mark a long vowel.
    • 1993, John Minahane, The Christian Druids: On the Filid or Philosopher-poets of Ireland, Dublin: Sanas Press (reprinted Dublin: Howth Free Press, 2008, →ISBN p. 35:
      When I read in the RIA Dictionary that the third person singular passive perfect of the verb fo-geib or fo-gaib “has been found”, has been found in the form frith, frioth, fo frith, foríth, and whole lot more including fríth with the fada, I find that friothfully froth-provoking.
    • 2006, Elizabeth Keane, An Irish Statesman and Revolutionary: The Nationalist and Internationalist Politics of Seán MacBride, London: I. B. Tauris, →ISBN p. vii:
      The Irish acute accent mark, or fada, is included on Irish proper names and words in the Irish language where required, for example Seán MacBride and Dáil Éireann, except when the fada is not used in a direct quote.
    • 2007, Holly Bennett, The Warrior’s Daughter, Custer, Washington: Orca Book Publishers, →ISBN, p. ix:
      And finally, I have omitted the fadas, or accents, from all Irish words, since they are no help to a North American reader.
    • 2008, Caroline Williams, “The Irish Playography: documenting the Irish Theatrical Repertoire”, in: Du document à l’utilisateur : Rôles et responsabilités des centres spécialisés dans les arts du spectacle, ed. M. Auclair, K. Davis, and S. François, Brussels: Peter Lang, →ISBN pp. 219-20:
      It’s very common in Irish to use a fada on a name, and we had to ensure that a name like Seán, for example should [be possible for] people [to] search [for] with or without the fada on “á”.

Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *Fāta (goddess of fate), from the plural of Latin fātum (fate).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: fa‧da

Noun[edit]

fada f (plural fades)

  1. fairy

Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *Fāta (goddess of fate), from the plural of Latin fātum (fate, destiny told by the gods). Compare French fée, Italian fata, Occitan and Portuguese fada, Spanish hada.

Noun[edit]

fada f (plural fades)

  1. fairy

Etymology 2[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fada

  1. feminine singular of fat

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fa.da/
  • (file)

Etymology 1[edit]

From Occitan fadatz.

Adjective[edit]

fada (feminine singular fadade, masculine plural fadas, feminine plural fadades)

  1. (Provence) crazy
    Synonym: fou

Noun[edit]

fada m or f (plural fadas)

  1. (Provence) nutcase
    Synonym: fou
    Il est pas tranquille celui-là, c'est un fada !
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)
    • 1998, “Sans Rémission”, in Si Dieu veut…, performed by Fonky Family:
      Je sème des rimes tant pis si j'passe pour un fada / Que je récolte nada, j'reste hip hop : soldat sans famas / Se parque devant les liasses comme le reste de la populace
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb[edit]

fada

  1. third-person singular past historic of fader

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *Fāta (goddess of fate), from the plural of Latin fātum (fate, destiny told by the gods). Compare French fée, Italian fata, Portuguese and Occitan fada, Spanish hada.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: fa‧da

Noun[edit]

fada f (plural fadas)

  1. fairy
  2. witch, sorceress

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish fota, from Proto-Indo-European *wasdʰos (long, wide); compare Latin vastus (wide).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fada (comparative faide or foide)

  1. long
  2. far

Declension[edit]

  • Alternative comparative form: foide (Cois Fharraige)

Derived terms[edit]

  • cóta fada m (long coat; (baby's) long robe)
  • síneadh fada m (acute accent, used to indicate a long vowel, literally long stretching)

Related terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
fada fhada bhfada
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]


Maltese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Root
f-d-j

Integrated loan verb from Sicilian fidari, from Vulgar Latin *fidare, from Latin fidere. Unrelated to native feda (to redeem).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

fada (imperfect jafda, past participle fdat)

  1. to trust

Conjugation[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Nigerian Pidgin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English father.

Noun[edit]

fada

  1. father

Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *Fāta (goddess of fate), from the plural of Latin fātum (fate, destiny told by the gods). Compare Catalan fada, French fée, Italian fata, Portuguese fada, Spanish hada.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: fa‧da

Noun[edit]

fada f (plural fadas)

  1. fairy

Portuguese[edit]

Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese fada, from Vulgar Latin *Fāta (goddess of fate), from the plural of Latin fātum (fate).

Compare Galician fada, Spanish hada, Catalan fada, Occitan fada, French fée and Italian fata.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fada f (plural fadas)

  1. fairy

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish fota, from Proto-Indo-European *wasdʰos (long, wide); compare Latin vastus (wide).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [fad̪̊ə], /fat̪ə/
  • Hyphenation: fa‧da

Adjective[edit]

fada (comparative fhaide)

  1. long
  2. far

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

fada

  1. long
  2. far
    • Bha agam ri feitheamh fada ro fhada.
      I had to wait far too long.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]