fada

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See also: fādá

English

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Irish fada (long).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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fada (plural fadas)

  1. The acute accent as used in Irish orthography to mark a long vowel.
    • 1993, John Minahane, The Christian Druids: On the Filid or Philosopher-poets of Ireland, Dublin: Sanas Press (reprinted Dublin: Howth Free Press, 2008, →ISBN p. 35:
      When I read in the RIA Dictionary that the third person singular passive perfect of the verb fo-geib or fo-gaib “has been found”, has been found in the form frith, frioth, fo frith, foríth, and whole lot more including fríth with the fada, I find that friothfully froth-provoking.
    • 2006, Elizabeth Keane, An Irish Statesman and Revolutionary: The Nationalist and Internationalist Politics of Seán MacBride[1], London: I. B. Tauris, →ISBN, page vii:
      The Irish acute accent mark, or fada, is included on Irish proper names and words in the Irish language where required, for example Seán MacBride and Dáil Éireann, except when the fada is not used in a direct quote.
    • 2007, Holly Bennett, The Warrior’s Daughter, Custer, Washington: Orca Book Publishers, →ISBN, page ix:
      And finally, I have omitted the fadas, or accents, from all Irish words, since they are no help to a North American reader.
    • 2008, Caroline Williams, “The Irish Playography: documenting the Irish Theatrical Repertoire”, in M. Auclair, K. Davis, S. François, editors, Du document à l’utilisateur : Rôles et responsabilités des centres spécialisés dans les arts du spectacle[2], Brussels: Peter Lang, →ISBN, pages 219–20:
      It’s very common in Irish to use a fada on a name, and we had to ensure that a name like Seán, for example should [be possible for] people [to] search [for] with or without the fada on “á”.

Anagrams

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Asturian

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Etymology

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From Vulgar Latin *Fāta (goddess of fate), from the plural of Latin fātum (fate).

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈfada/, [ˈfa.ð̞a]
  • Hyphenation: fa‧da

Noun

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fada f (plural fades)

  1. fairy

Catalan

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Vulgar Latin *Fāta (goddess of fate), from the plural of Latin fātum (fate, destiny told by the gods). Compare French fée, Italian fata, Occitan and Portuguese fada, Spanish hada.

Noun

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fada f (plural fades)

  1. fairy

Etymology 2

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Adjective

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fada

  1. feminine singular of fat

Further reading

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French

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /fa.da/
  • Audio:(file)

Etymology 1

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Borrowed from Occitan fadatz.

Adjective

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fada (feminine fadade, masculine plural fadas, feminine plural fadades)

  1. (Meridional) crazy
    Synonym: fou

Noun

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fada m or f by sense (plural fadas)

  1. (Meridional) nutcase
    Synonym: fou
    Il est pas tranquille celui-là, c’est un fada !
    He's not calm, he's crazy!
    • 1998, “Sans Rémission”, in Si Dieu veut…, performed by Fonky Family:
      Je sème des rimes tant pis si j’passe pour un fada / Que je récolte nada, j’reste hip hop : soldat sans FAMAS / Se parque devant les liasses comme le reste de la populace
      I sow these rhymes so much I pass for a nutter / though I reap nada, I'm sticking with hip-hop: soldier without a rifle / parked before the stacks like the rest of the people

Etymology 2

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See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

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fada

  1. third-person singular past historic of fader

Further reading

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Galician

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Etymology 1

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From Vulgar Latin *Fāta (goddess of fate) (compare xa from Diana), from the plural of Latin fātum (fate, destiny told by the gods). Cognate with French fée, Italian fata, Portuguese and Occitan fada, Spanish hada.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): [ˈfaðɐ]
  • Hyphenation: fa‧da

Noun

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fada f (plural fadas)

  1. fairy
    Synonyms: xa, xan
  2. fate, destiny
    • c. 1295, R. Lorenzo, editor, La traducción gallega de la Crónica General y de la Crónica de Castilla, Ourense: I.E.O.P.F, page 130:
      Et o conde normando, quando a uio fremosa, que mays nõ poderia seer hũa dõzella, dissolle entõ en poridade que auia grã querela della, por que tijna que era dona sem ventura et de maa fada, mays que quantas auia en seu logar et en seu linagẽ, poys que os castelaaos auiã rrecebudo tã grã pesar por ella.
      And the Norman count, when he saw that she was beauty, more than what any maiden could be, told her privately that he had a big trouble with here, because he considered that she was an unfortunate lady, and a jinx [lit. of bad fate], more than every woman in her place and her lineage, since the Castilian had received such large harm because of her
    • 1859, Manuel Fernández Magariños, Seor Pedro, section 7:
      Por necesidá a guerra é pasadeira, e eso solo porque ten orixen na fada, con que nacemos de senreirar uns contra outros
      because of necessity war is passable, and that just because it originates in the fate, with which we are born, of being hostile against each other
Derived terms
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References

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  • Ernesto González Seoane, María Álvarez de la Granja, Ana Isabel Boullón Agrelo (20062022) “fada”, in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval (in Galician), Santiago de Compostela: ILG
  • Xavier Varela Barreiro, Xavier Gómez Guinovart (20062018) “fada”, in Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval (in Galician), Santiago de Compostela: ILG
  • fada” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • fada” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • fada” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Etymology 2

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Verb

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fada

  1. inflection of fadar:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Irish

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Etymology

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From Old Irish fota,[1] from Proto-Indo-European *wasdʰos (long, wide); compare Latin vastus (wide).

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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fada (comparative faide or foide)

  1. long
  2. far

Declension

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  • Alternative comparative form: foide (Cois Fharraige)

Derived terms

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Mutation

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Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
fada fhada bhfada
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References

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  1. ^ Gregory Toner, Sharon Arbuthnot, Máire Ní Mhaonaigh, Marie-Luise Theuerkauf, Dagmar Wodtko, editors (2019), “fota, fata”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  2. ^ Sjoestedt, M. L. (1931) Phonétique d’un parler irlandais de Kerry (in French), Paris: Librairie Ernest Leroux, § 184, page 95
  3. ^ Finck, F. N. (1899) Die araner mundart (in German), volume II, Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, page 101
  4. ^ Quiggin, E. C. (1906) A Dialect of Donegal, Cambridge University Press, § 310, page 109

Further reading

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Maltese

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Root
f-d-j (trust)
2 terms

Alternative forms

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Sicilian fidari, from Vulgar Latin *fīdāre, from Latin fīdere. Unrelated to native feda (to redeem).

Pronunciation

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Verb

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fada (imperfect jafda, past participle fdat, verbal noun fdar)

  1. to trust
  2. to entrust
  3. to be careless

Conjugation

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    Conjugation of fada
singular plural
1st person 2nd person 3rd person 1st person 2nd person 3rd person
perfect m fdajt fdajt fada fdajna fdajtu fdaw
f fdat
imperfect m nafda tafda jafda nafdaw tafdaw jafdaw
f tafda
imperative afda afdaw
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Nigerian Pidgin

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Etymology

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From English father.

Noun

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fada

  1. father

Occitan

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Etymology

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From Vulgar Latin *Fāta (goddess of fate), from the plural of Latin fātum (fate, destiny told by the gods). Compare Catalan fada, French fée, Italian fata, Portuguese fada, Spanish hada.

Pronunciation

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  • Audio:(file)
  • Hyphenation: fa‧da

Noun

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fada f (plural fadas)

  1. fairy

Portuguese

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Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt

Etymology 1

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From Old Galician-Portuguese fada, from Vulgar Latin *Fāta (goddess of fate), from the plural of Latin fātum (fate).

Compare Galician, Catalan, and Occitan fada, Spanish hada, French fée and Italian fata.

Pronunciation

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  • Rhymes: -adɐ
  • Hyphenation: fa‧da

Noun

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fada f (plural fadas)

  1. fairy
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

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fada

  1. inflection of fadar:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Scottish Gaelic

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Etymology

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From Old Irish fota. Cognates include Irish fada and Manx foddey.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈfat̪ə/
  • Hyphenation: fa‧da

Adjective

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fada (comparative fhaide, qualitative noun fhaide)

  1. long
  2. far

Declension

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Derived terms

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Adverb

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fada

  1. long
    Bha agam ri feitheamh fada ro fhada.I had to wait far too long.
  2. far, much
    Bha agam ri feitheamh fada ro fhada.I had to wait far too long.

Derived terms

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Mutation

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Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
fada fhada
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References

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Venetian

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Etymology

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Ultimately from Latin fatum.

Noun

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fada f

  1. fairy

Yoruba

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Etymology

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From Hausa fādà (palace).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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fádà

  1. A public display or performance, normally performed for a king in his court or palace
    wọ́n tẹ́ fádà ijóThey put on a public display of dance