fatum

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See also: fátum

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From fātus, perfect active participle of for (speak).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fātum n (genitive fātī); second declension

  1. destiny, fate, lot
    Synonyms: fortūna, sors, necessitās
    alicuius fatum est/ alicui fatum est + infinitivesomeone is fated to ...
    • 29 BCE – 19 BCE, Virgil, Aeneid 1.1-3:
      Arma virumque canō, Trōiae quī prīmus ab ōrīs
      Ītaliam, fātō profugus, Lāvīniaque vēnit
      lītora, [...].
      I sing of arms and a man, exiled by fate, who first came from the coasts of Troy to Italy and the shores of Lavinium.
      (Here, “by fate” [fātō] is an ablative of cause, meaning “because of,” or “on account of.” The epic of Aeneas and his band of refugees begins: divine fate compels their actions and will propel the story. See: Aeneid, Troy, Italy, Lavinium.)
  2. (in the plural) death
    Synonyms: mors, fūnus, exitus, perniciēs, interitus, somnus, fīnis, sopor
  3. (of a god) speech
  4. utterance, declaration, proclamation, prediction, prophecy
    Synonyms: praedictiō, praedictum, prophētīa
    • 43 BCEc. 17 CE, Ovid, Fasti 1.481-482:
      sīc erat in fātīs; nec tē tua culpa fugāvit, sed deus
      Thus it was in the prophecies: no fault of yours has exiled you, but a god.

Declension[edit]

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative fātum fāta
Genitive fātī fātōrum
Dative fātō fātīs
Accusative fātum fāta
Ablative fātō fātīs
Vocative fātum fāta

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

See also[edit]

Participle[edit]

fātum

  1. inflection of fātus:
    1. nominative/accusative/vocative neuter singular
    2. accusative masculine singular

References[edit]

  • fatum”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • fatum in Enrico Olivetti, editor (2003-2024) Dizionario Latino, Olivetti Media Communication
  • fatum”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • fatum”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin fātum. Doublet of bajać, bajan, fabuła, fama, fatalny, and fejm.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈfa.tum/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -atum
  • Syllabification: fa‧tum

Noun[edit]

fatum n

  1. destiny, fate, doom, jinx

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • fatum in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • fatum in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from Latin fatum.

Noun[edit]

fatum n (uncountable)

  1. fate

Declension[edit]

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin fatum.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fǎːtum/
  • Hyphenation: fa‧tum

Noun[edit]

fátum m (Cyrillic spelling фа́тум)

  1. fate, destiny

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • fatum” in Hrvatski jezični portal

West Makian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

May be the same as West Makian fatung (to sniff).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

fatum

  1. (transitive) to smell (something)

Conjugation[edit]

Conjugation of fatum (action verb)
singular plural
inclusive exclusive
1st person tafatum mafatum afatum
2nd person nafatum fafatum
3rd person inanimate ifatum dafatum
animate
imperative nafatum, fatum fafatum, fatum

References[edit]

  • Clemens Voorhoeve (1982) The Makian languages and their neighbours[1], Pacific linguistics