fortuna

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: Fortuna

Catalan[edit]

Noun[edit]

fortuna f ‎(plural fortunes)

  1. fortune, chance
  2. fortune, riches

Derived terms[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fortuna ‎(accusative singular fortunan, plural fortunaj, accusative plural fortunajn)

  1. fortunate

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Noun[edit]

fortuna

  1. bagatelle, pin bagatelle (table game)

Declension[edit]

Inflection of fortuna (Kotus type 13/katiska, no gradation)
nominative fortuna fortunat
genitive fortunan fortunoiden
fortunoitten
fortunojen
partitive fortunaa fortunoita
fortunoja
illative fortunaan fortunoihin
singular plural
nominative fortuna fortunat
accusative nom. fortuna fortunat
gen. fortunan
genitive fortunan fortunoiden
fortunoitten
fortunojen
fortunainrare
partitive fortunaa fortunoita
fortunoja
inessive fortunassa fortunoissa
elative fortunasta fortunoista
illative fortunaan fortunoihin
adessive fortunalla fortunoilla
ablative fortunalta fortunoilta
allative fortunalle fortunoille
essive fortunana fortunoina
translative fortunaksi fortunoiksi
instructive fortunoin
abessive fortunatta fortunoitta
comitative fortunoineen

Synonyms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin fortūna, from fōrs ‎(chance, luck)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fortuna f ‎(plural fortune)

  1. luck
  2. fortune

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From fōrs ‎(chance, luck).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fortūna f ‎(genitive fortūnae); first declension

  1. fortune, luck
  2. good fortune; misfortune (depending on context)
    • Vergilius, Aeneis, Book V, line 710
      Superanda omnis fortuna ferendo est.
      All misfortune is to be overcome by enduring.
    • Vergilius, Aeneis, Book X, lines 42-43
      Speravimus ista, dum fortuna fuit.
      Such we hoped, while good fortune was.
  3. destiny, fate
  4. prosperity
  5. (in the plural) possessions

Declension[edit]

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative fortūna fortūnae
genitive fortūnae fortūnārum
dative fortūnae fortūnīs
accusative fortūnam fortūnās
ablative fortūnā fortūnīs
vocative fortūna fortūnae

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • fortuna in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • fortuna in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • FORTUNA in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • fortuna in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the position of the lower classes: condicio ac fortuna hominum infimi generis
    • to be fortunate, lucky: fortuna secunda uti
    • to be favoured by Fortune; to bask in Fortune's smiles: fortunae favore or prospero flatu fortunae uti (vid. sect. VI. 8., note uti...)
    • to be favoured by Fortune; to bask in Fortune's smiles: fortunam fautricem nancisci
    • Fortune makes men shortsighted, infatuates them: fortuna caecos homines efficit, animos occaecat
    • to try one's luck: fortunam tentare, experiri
    • to run a risk; to tempt Providence: fortunam periclitari (periculum facere)
    • to trust to luck: fortunae se committere
    • to have success in one's grasp: fortunam in manibus habere
    • to let success slip through one's fingers: fortunam ex manibus dimittere
    • luck is changing, waning: fortuna commutatur, se inclinat
    • the plaything of Fortune: ludibrium fortunae
    • Fortune's favourite: is, quem fortuna complexa est
    • to be abandoned by good luck: a fortuna desertum, derelictum esse
    • Fortune exalts a man, makes him conspicuous: fortuna aliquem effert
    • misfortune, adversity: fortuna adversa
    • to struggle with adversity: conflictari (cum) adversa fortuna
    • the vicissitudes of fortune: fortunae vicissitudines
    • to experience the vicissitudes of fortune; to have a chequered career: varia fortuna uti
    • to be exposed to the assaults of fate: fortunae telis propositum esse
    • to be abandoned to fate: fortunae obiectum esse
    • to be a victim of the malice of Fortune: ad iniurias fortunae expositum esse
    • to acquiesce in one's fate: fortunae cedere
    • to be in the enjoyment of a large fortune: fortunis maximis ornatum esse
    • I am discontented with my lot: fortunae meae me paenitet
    • to drive a person out of house and home: exturbare aliquem omnibus fortunis, e possessionibus
    • to drive a person out of house and home: evertere aliquem bonis, fortunis patriis
    • to take up one's abode in a place, settle down somewhere: sedem ac domicilium (fortunas suas) constituere alicubi
    • a degraded, servile condition: infima fortuna or condicio servorum
  • fortuna in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • fortuna in Samuel Ball Platner (1929), Thomas Ashby, editor, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, London: Oxford University Press
  • fortuna in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin fortūna, from fōrs ‎(chance, luck).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fortuna f (plural fortunas)

  1. fortune (destiny)
  2. fortune (good luck)
  3. fortune (lots of riches)

Synonyms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin fortūna, from fōrs ‎(chance, luck)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fortuna f ‎(plural fortunas)

  1. fortune.
  2. wealth.
  3. luck.

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]