res

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See also: Res., res-, re's, rés, and rês

Translingual[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Symbol[edit]

res

  1. (analysis) residue

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

res ‎(plural reses)

  1. (Canada, US, informal) short form of reservation
  2. (Canada, South Africa) short form of residence
  3. short form of resolution (of a computer display).
  4. short form of reservoir (from computer water cooling).
  5. (role-playing games) short form of resurrection
    Can I get a res please?

Synonyms[edit]

  • rez (Indian reserve or reservation)

Verb[edit]

res ‎(third-person singular simple present reses, present participle resing, simple past and past participle resed)

  1. (role-playing games) short form of resurrect
    You have the skills, right? Res me please.

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin rēs ‎(thing)

Pronoun[edit]

res

  1. nothing
  2. (in negative sentences) anything

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

res

  1. plural of re

Galician[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Latin rēs ‎(thing)

Noun[edit]

res f ‎(plural reses)

  1. head of quadrupedal cattle or game

Etymology 2[edit]

Plural of re.

Noun[edit]

res m pl

  1. plural of re

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *reis, from Proto-Indo-European *reh₁ís ‎(wealth, goods). Cognate to Old Persian [script needed] ‎(rāy-, paradise, wealth), Avestan 𐬭𐬁𐬫 ‎(rāy-, paradise, wealth) and Sanskrit रयि ‎(rayí, property, goods).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rēs f ‎(genitive reī); fifth declension

  1. thing, matter, issue, affair, stuff
    • Cato the Elder
      Rem tene, verba sequentur
      Grasp the matter, the words will follow
    Dixit duas res ei rubori fuisse.
    He said that two things had abashed him.
  2. state, republic, commonwealth
    • Attributed to Ennius by Augustinus in De Civitate Dei; Book II, Chapter XXI
      Moribus antiquis res stat Romana virisque.
      The Roman state remains by means of its ancient customs and heroes.

Inflection[edit]

Fifth declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative rēs rēs
genitive reī rērum
dative reī rēbus
accusative rem rēs
ablative rēbus
vocative rēs rēs

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • res in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • res in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • RES in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • res in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the universe: rerum or mundi universitas
    • creation; nature: rerum natura or simply natura
    • God is the Creator of the world: deus est mundi procreator (not creator), aedificator, fabricator, opifex rerum
    • the elements: elementa; initia or principia rerum
    • the elements and first beginnings: elementa et tamquam semina rerum
    • picture to yourselves the circumstances: ante oculos vestros (not vobis) res gestas proponite
    • the world of sense, the visible world: res sensibus or oculis subiectae (De Fin. 5. 12. 36)
    • the world of sense, the visible world: res quas oculis cernimus
    • the world of sense, the visible world: res externae
    • human life: res humanae or simply res
    • that is the way of the world; such is life: haec est rerum humanarum condicio
    • to despise earthly things: res externas or humanas despicere
    • to feel superior to the affairs of life: res humanas infra se positas arbitrari
    • my position is considerably improved; my prospects are brighter: res meae meliore loco, in meliore causa sunt
    • under such unfavourable circumstances: in tanta rerum (temporum) iniquitate
    • a critical position; a hopeless state of affairs: res dubiae, perditae, afflictae
    • the facts are these; the matter stands thus: res ita est, ita (sic) se habet
    • circumstances make this necessary; the exigencies of the case are these: res (ita) fert
    • the matter has gone so far that...; the state of affairs is such that..: res eo or in eum locum deducta est, ut...
    • how are you getting on: quo loco res tuae sunt?
    • whatever happens; in any case: utcumque res ceciderit
    • what will be the issue, end, consequence of the matter: quorsum haec res cadet or evadet?
    • the result has surprised me; I was not prepared for this development: res aliter cecidit ac putaveram
    • cause and effect: causae rerum et consecutiones
    • concatenation, interdependence of causes: rerum causae aliae ex aliis nexae
    • important results are often produced by trivial causes: ex parvis saepe magnarum rerum momenta pendent
    • in many respects; in many points: multis rebus or locis
    • as regards the rest; otherwise: ceteris rebus (not cetera)
    • from every point of view; looked at in every light: omni ex parte; in omni genere; omnibus rebus
    • the matter is still undecided; it is an open question: res integra est
    • I have not yet committed myself: res mihi integra est
    • to put the matter entirely in some one's hands: omnium rerum arbitrium alicui permittere
    • to be puffed up by success; to be made arrogant by prosperity: rebus secundis efferri
    • when life runs smoothly: in rebus prosperis et ad voluntatem fluentibus
    • misfortune, adversity: res adversae, afflictae, perditae
    • the position is very critical: res in summo discrimine versatur
    • affairs are desperate; we are reduced to extremeties: res ad extremum casum perducta est
    • to assist, stand by a person: adesse alicui or alicuius rebus (opp. deesse)
    • to take measures for one's safety; to look after one's own interests: suis rebus or sibi consulere
    • I console myself with..: haec (illa) res me consolatur
    • to live in great affluence: in omnium rerum abundantia vivere
    • to be reduced to (abject) poverty: ad egestatem, ad inopiam (summam omnium rerum) redigi
    • to demand restitution, satisfaction: res repetere
    • to give restitution, satisfaction: res restituere
    • a thing meets with my approval: res mihi probatur
    • I express my approval of a thing: res a me probatur
    • I blame this in you; I censure you for this: hoc in te reprehendo (not ob eam rem)
    • the matter involves much labour and fatigue: res est multi laboris et sudoris
    • to have all one's trouble for nothing: rem actam or simply actum agere (proverb.)
    • to be inattentive: alias res or aliud agere
    • creatures of the imagination: rerum imagines
    • creatures of the imagination: res cogitatione fictae or depictae
    • to study the commonplace: cogitationes in res humiles abicere (De Amic. 9. 32) (Opp. alte spectare, ad altiora tendere, altum, magnificum, divinum suspicere)
    • after mature deliberation: omnibus rebus circumspectis
    • the matter tends towards..., has this object.[1: res eo spectat, ut
    • there seems a prospect of armed violence; things look like violence: res spectat ad vim (arma)
    • to have had practical experience: in rebus atque in usu versatum esse
    • varied, manifold experience: multarum rerum usus
    • we know from experience: usu rerum (vitae, vitae communis) edocti sumus
    • everyday experience tells us this: res ipsa, usus rerum (cotidie) docet
    • to have had no experience of the world: (rerum) imperitum esse
    • to be well-informed, erudite: multarum rerum cognitione imbutum esse (opp. litterarum or eruditionis expertem esse or [rerum] rudem esse)
    • to borrow instances from history: exempla petere, repetere a rerum gestarum memoria or historiarum (annalium, rerum gestarum) monumentis
    • examples taken from Roman (Greek) history: exempla a rerum Romanarum (Graecarum) memoria petita
    • moral science; ethics: philosophia, in qua de bonis rebus et malis, deque hominum vita et moribus disputatur
    • theoretical, speculative philosophy: philosophia, quae in rerum contemplatione versatur, or quae artis praeceptis continetur
    • to define a thing: rem (res) definire
    • systematic succession, concatenation: continuatio seriesque rerum, ut alia ex alia nexa et omnes inter se aptae colligataeque sint (N. D. 1. 4. 9)
    • to reunite disconnected elements: rem dissolutam conglutinare, coagmentare
    • I have a point to discuss with you: res mihi tecum est
    • the very facts of the case show this: res ipsa docet
    • the matter speaks for itself: res ipsa (pro me apud te) loquitur
    • the question is settled, finished: res confecta est
    • Roman history (i.e. the events in it): res Romanae
    • Roman history (i.e. the events in it): res gestae Romanorum
    • Roman history (i.e. the exposition, representation of it by writers): historia Romana or rerum Romanarum historia
    • Roman history (as tradition): memoria rerum Romanarum
    • to write a history of Rome: res populi Romani perscribere
    • an historian: rerum scriptor
    • an historian: rerum auctor (as authority)
    • we read in history: apud rerum scriptores scriptum videmus, scriptum est
    • ancient history: rerum veterum memoria
    • universal history: omnis memoria, omnis memoria aetatum, temporum, civitatum or omnium rerum, gentium, temporum, saeculorum memoria
    • historic truth: historiae, rerum fides
    • an acknowledged historical fact: res historiae fide comprobata
    • genuine historical truth: incorrupta rerum fides
    • to be well versed in Roman history: memoriam rerum gestarum (rerum Romanarum) tenere
    • to narrate events in the order of their occurrence: res temporum ordine servato narrare
    • an astronomer: spectator siderum, rerum caelestium or astrologus
    • to celebrate some one's exploits in song: alicuius res gestas versibus ornare, celebrare
    • graphic depiction: rerum sub aspectum paene subiectio (De Or. 3. 53. 202)
    • to represent a thing dramatically: sic exponere aliquid, quasi agatur res (non quasi narretur)
    • to dwell only on the main points: res summas attingere
    • to explain a matter briefly, in a few words (not paucis verbis): rem paucis absolvere (Sall. Iug. 17. 2)
    • the circumstances are described in language worthy of them: rebus ipsis par est oratio
    • the circumstances are described in language worthy of them: rebus verba respondent
    • to detail the whole history of an affair: ordine narrare, quomodo res gesta sit
    • I have abundance to say: res (opp. verba) mihi suppetit
    • to arrange and divide the subject-matter: res componere ac digerere
    • the arrangement of the subject-matter: dispositio rerum (De Inv. 1. 7. 9)
    • abundance of material: materia rerum et copia uberrima
    • a theme, subject proposed for discussion: res proposita
    • to come back to the point: ad rem redire
    • the question at issue: res, de qua nunc quaerimus, quaeritur
    • to be contented: rebus suis, sorte sua contentum esse
    • to despair of one's position: desperare suis rebus
    • absolute despair; a hopeless situation: desperatio rerum (omnium) (Catil. 2. 11. 25)
    • his enthusiasm has abated, cooled down: ardor animi resēdit, consedit
    • there is something repulsive about the thing: res habet aliquid offensionis
    • to measure something by the standard of something else; to make something one's criterion: dirigere or referre aliquid ad aliquam rem
    • ritual; ceremonial: sacra, res divinae, religiones, caerimoniae
    • to take part in divine service (of the priest): rebus divinis interesse (B. G. 6. 13)
    • to sacrifice: rem divinam facere (dis)
    • after having performed the sacrifice (with due ritual): rebus divinis (rite) perpetratis
    • after having duly taken the auspices: auspicato (rem gerere, urbem condere)
    • a comfortably-furnished house: domus necessariis rebus instructa
    • to keep house: rem domesticam, familiarem administrare, regere, curare
    • to possess means, to be well off: rem or opes habere, bona possidere, in bonis esse
    • to manage one's affairs, household, property well or ill: rem bene (male) gerere (vid. sect. XVI. 10a)
    • to manage one's affairs, household, property well or ill: rem familiarem tueri
    • to neglect, mismanage one's household matters: rem familiarem neglegere
    • movable, personal property: res, quae moveri possunt; res moventes (Liv. 5. 25. 6)
    • the necessaries of life: res ad vitam necessariae
    • things indispensable to a life of comfort: res ad victum cultumque necessariae
    • to be abandoned to a life of excess: omnium rerum copia diffluere
    • to squander all one's property: dissipare rem familiarem (suam)
    • to separate from, divorce (of the man): aliquam suas res sibi habere iubere (Phil. 2. 28. 69)
    • a thing is going out of use, becoming obsolete: res obsolescit
    • to settle, finish a transaction: negotium (rem) conficere, absolvere
    • to have business relations with some one: contrahere rem or negotium cum aliquo (Cluent. 14. 41)
    • imports and exports: res, quae importantur et exportantur
    • finance; money-matters: res nummaria or pecuniaria
    • to rear stock: rem pecuariam facere, exercere (cf. Varr R. R. 2. 1)
    • to give the state a constitution: rem publicam constituere
    • to give the state a constitution: rem publicam legibus et institutis temperare (Tusc. 1. 1. 2)
    • to have no constitution, be in anarchy: nullam habere rem publicam
    • to restore the ancient constitution: rem publicam in pristinum statum restituere
    • the Republic: libera res publica, liber populus
    • to govern, administer the state: rem publicam gerere, administrare, regere, tractare, gubernare
    • to devote oneself to politics, a political career: accedere, se conferre ad rem publicam
    • to devote oneself to politics, a political career: rem publicam capessere (Off. 1. 21. 71)
    • (ambiguous) to take part in politics: in re publica or in rebus publicis versari
    • to defend, strengthen the state: rem publicam tueri, stabilire
    • the state is secure: res publica stat (opp. iacet)
    • to aggrandise, extend the power of the state: rem publicam augere, amplificare
    • (ambiguous) for the advantage of the state; in the interests of the state: e re publica (opp. contra rem p.)
    • (ambiguous) the welfare of the state: summa res publica (or summa rei publicae)
    • to devote one's every thought to the state's welfare: in rem publicam omni cogitatione curaque incumbere (Fam. 10. 1. 2)
    • to devote one's every thought to the state's welfare: omnes curas et cogitationes in rem publicam conferre
    • (ambiguous) statesmen: viri rerum civilium, rei publicae gerendae periti or viri in re publica prudentes
    • statesmen: principes rem publicam administrantes or simply principes
    • political questions: res civiles
    • to leave a matter to be decided by popular vote: multitudinis suffragiis rem permittere
    • to throw oneself heart and soul into politics: studio ad rem publicam ferri
    • democracy: imperium populi or populare, civitas or res publica popularis
    • a demagogue, agitator: plebis dux, vulgi turbator, civis turbulentus, civis rerum novarum cupidus
    • revolutionists: homines seditiosi, turbulenti or novarum rerum cupidi
    • to hold revolutionary opinions: novis rebus studere
    • to hold revolutionary opinions: novarum rerum cupidum esse
    • to plot a revolution: novas res moliri (Verr. 2. 125)
    • to foster revolutionary projects: contra rem publicam sentire
    • to be guilty of high treason: contra rem publicam facere
    • to shake the stability of the state: rem publicam labefactare
    • to throw the state into confusion: rem publicam perturbare
    • to damage the state: rem publicam vexare
    • to completely overthrow the government, the state: rem publicam funditus evertere
    • general confusion; anarchy: perturbatio omnium rerum (Flacc. 37)
    • things seem tending towards an interregnum: res fluit ad interregnum
    • amnesty (ἀμνηρτία): ante actarum (praeteritarum) rerum oblivio or simply oblivio
    • to confer supreme power on a person: imperium, rerum summam deferre alicui
    • to give some one unlimited power in state affairs: rem publicam alicui permittere
    • (1) to usurp supreme power, (2) to be in a position of power: rerum potiri
    • to deliver the state from a tyranny: rem publicam in libertatem vindicare a or ex dominatione
    • to enjoy absolute immunity: immunitatem omnium rerum habere
    • to enrich oneself at the expense of the state: rem publicam quaestui habere
    • an interregnum ensues: res ad interregnum venit or adducitur
    • let the consuls take measures for the protection of the state: videant or dent operam consules, ne quid res publica detrimenti capiat (Catil. 1. 2. 4)
    • a matter is referred (for decision) from the senate to the people: a senatu res ad populum reicitur
    • (ambiguous) to charge some one with a capital offence: accusare aliquem rei capitalis (rerum capitalium)
    • to rescind a decision: res iudicatas rescindere (Cic. Sull. 22. 63)
    • to look after the commissariat: rem frumentariam comparare, providere
    • to perform heroic exploits: magnas res gerere
    • a success; a glorious feat of arms: res fortiter feliciterque gesta
    • a success; a glorious feat of arms: res bene gesta
    • exploits in war; brilliant actions: res gestae
    • matters have reached the fighting-stage: res ad arma venit
    • to demand satisfaction, restitution: res repetere (ab aliquo) (Off. 1. 11. 36)
    • to make restitution: res reddere (alicui) (cf. sect. V. 11)
    • to refer a matter to a council of war: rem ad consilium deferre
    • to win, lose a fight (of the commander): rem (bene, male) gerere (vid. sect. XII. 2, note rem gerere...)
    • the position is critical: res est in periculo, in summo discrimine
    • the triarii must now fight (proverbially = we are reduced to extremities): res ad triarios redit (Liv. 8. 8)
    • to fight with swords at close quarters: gladio comminus (opp. eminus) rem gerere
    • to throw down the javelins (pila) and fight with the sword: omissis pilis gladiis rem gerere
    • swords must now decide the day: res ad gladios vēnit
    • swords must now decide the day: res gladiis geri coepta est
    • the fighting is now at close quarters: res ad manus venit
    • to have a powerful navy: rebus maritimis multum valere
    • in short; to be brief: ut paucis (rem) absolvam
    • but this is not to the point: sed hoc nihil (sane) ad rem
    • you have hit the nail on the head: rem acu tetigisti
    • it is so: ita res est
    • the matter stands so (otherwise): res ita (aliter) se habet
    • (ambiguous) Gaul is bounded by the Rhone.[TR1: Gallia Rhodano continetur (vid. sect. V. 4., note contineri aliqua re...)
    • (ambiguous) to be on horseback: in equo sedere; equo insidēre
    • (ambiguous) to have time for a thing: tempus habere alicui rei
    • (ambiguous) to pass one's time in doing something: tempus consumere in aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to waste time on something: tempus terere, conterere (in) aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to devote time to anything: tempus tribuere alicui rei
    • (ambiguous) in the time of the Republic: libera re publica
    • (ambiguous) to make not the slightest effort; not to stir a finger: manum non vertere alicuius rei causa
    • (ambiguous) to make oneself conspicuous: conspici, conspicuum esse aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to feast one's eyes with the sight of..: oculos pascere aliqua re (also simply pasci aliqua re)
    • (ambiguous) to turn one's gaze away from an object: oculos deicere, removere ab aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to prostrate oneself before a person: ad pedes alicuius iacēre, stratum esse (stratum iacēre)
    • (ambiguous) to be seriously ill: vehementer, graviter aeogratare, iacēre
    • (ambiguous) to watch by a sick man's bedside: assidēre aegroto (Liv. 25. 26)
    • (ambiguous) the case is exactly similar (entirely different): eadem (longe alia) est huius rei ratio
    • (ambiguous) according to circumstances: pro re (nata), pro tempore
    • (ambiguous) according to circumstances: pro tempore et pro re
    • (ambiguous) to begin with a thing: initium capere; incipere ab aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to commence a thing: initium facere, ducere, sumere (alicuius rei)
    • (ambiguous) to finish, complete, fulfil, accomplish a thing: finem facere alicuius rei
    • (ambiguous) to finish, complete, fulfil, accomplish a thing: finem imponere, afferre, constituere alicui rei
    • (ambiguous) the motive, cause, is to be found in..: causa posita est in aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) the motive, cause, is to be found in..: causa repetenda est ab aliqua re (not quaerenda)
    • (ambiguous) extraneous causes: causae extrinsecus allatae (opp. in ipsa re positae)
    • (ambiguous) to originate in, arise from: ex aliqua re nasci, manare
    • (ambiguous) to originate in, arise from: ab aliqua re proficisci
    • (ambiguous) to accrue in great abundance: ex aliqua re redundare (in or ad aliquid)
    • (ambiguous) untold advantages arise from a thing: utilitas efflorescit ex aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to have regard for; take into consideration: rationem habere alicuius rei
    • (ambiguous) in both cases; whichever way you look at it: in utraque re
    • (ambiguous) to depend upon a thing: positum, situm esse in aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to depend upon a thing: contineri aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to depend upon a thing: consistere in aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to depend upon a thing: pendēre ex aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) all depends on this; this is the decisive point: in ea re omnia vertuntur
    • (ambiguous) to be composed of; to consist of: constare ex aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) it is evident from..: cernitur (in) aliqua re (not ex aliqua re)
    • (ambiguous) the decision of the question rests with you: penes te arbitrium huius rei est
    • (ambiguous) to give a man the opportunity of doing a thing: occasionem alicui dare, praebere alicuius rei or ad aliquid faciendum
    • (ambiguous) to give a man the opportunity of doing a thing: facultatem alicui dare alicuius rei or ut possit...
    • (ambiguous) no opportunity of carrying out an object presents itself: nulla est facultas alicuius rei
    • (ambiguous) to be induced by a consideration: adduci aliqua re (ad aliquid or ut...)
    • (ambiguous) his crowning happiness is produced by a thing; the culminating point of his felicity is..: ad felicitatem (magnus) cumulus accedit ex aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to make trial of; to risk: periculum facere alicuius rei
    • (ambiguous) to comfort a man in a matter; to condole with him: consolari aliquem de aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to suffer from want of a thing: inopia alicuius rei laborare, premi
    • (ambiguous) to derive (great) profit , advantage from a thing: fructum (uberrimum) capere, percipere, consequi ex aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) (great) advantage accrues to me from this: fructus ex hac re redundant in or ad me
    • (ambiguous) to throw away, sacrifice: iacturam alicuius rei facere
    • (ambiguous) to balance a loss by anything: damnum compensare cum aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to find favour with some one; to get into their good graces: benevolentiam, favorem, voluntatem alicuius sibi conciliare or colligere (ex aliqua re)
    • (ambiguous) to show gratitude (in one's acts): gratiam alicui referre (meritam, debitam) pro aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to thank a person (in words): gratias alicui agere pro aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to consider of importance; to set much (some) store by a thing: multum (aliquid) alicui rei tribuere
    • (ambiguous) the stipulated reward for anything: pacta merces alicuius rei
    • (ambiguous) to expostulate with a person about a thing: conqueri, expostulare cum aliquo de aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to inform a person: certiorem facere aliquem (alicuius rei or de aliqua re)
    • (ambiguous) to mention a thing: mentionem facere alicuius rei or de aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to mention a thing incidentally, casually: mentionem inicere de aliqua re or Acc. c. Inf.
    • (ambiguous) to mention a thing incidentally, casually: in mentionem alicuius rei incidere
    • (ambiguous) to mention a thing incidentally, casually: mentio alicuius rei incidit
    • (ambiguous) to expend great labour on a thing: egregiam operam (multum, plus etc. operae) dare alicui rei
    • (ambiguous) to expend great labour on a thing: operam alicui rei tribuere, in aliquid conferre
    • (ambiguous) to exert oneself very energetically in a matter: multum operae ac laboris consumere in aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to apply oneself zealously, diligently to a thing: studium, industriam (not diligentiam) collocare, ponere in aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to exert oneself very considerably in a matter: desudare et elaborare in aliqua re (De Senect. 11. 38)
    • (ambiguous) to spare oneself the trouble of the voyage: labore supersedēre (itineris) (Fam. 4. 2. 4)
    • (ambiguous) to strain every nerve, do one's utmost in a matter: omnes nervos in aliqua re contendere
    • (ambiguous) to be engaged upon a matter: occupatum esse in aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to be engaged upon a matter: intentum esse alicui rei
    • (ambiguous) to spend one's leisure hours on an object: otiosum tempus consumere in aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to derive pleasure from a thing: voluptatem ex aliqua re capere or percipere
    • (ambiguous) to recruit oneself, seek relaxation: animum relaxare, reficere, recreare or simply se reficere, se recreare, refici, recreari (ex aliqua re)
    • (ambiguous) something comes into my mind: mihi in mentem venit alicuius rei
    • (ambiguous) to draw away some one's attention from a thing: alicuius animum ab aliqua re abducere
    • (ambiguous) to fix all one's thoughts on an object: mentem in aliqua re defigere
    • (ambiguous) to form a conception, notion of a thing: notionem or rationem alicuius rei in animo informare or animo concipere
    • (ambiguous) ideally, not really: cogitatione, non re
    • (ambiguous) to have formed an ideal notion of a thing: comprehensam quandam animo speciem (alicuius rei) habere
    • (ambiguous) to infer by comparison, judge one thing by another: coniecturam alicuius rei facere or capere ex aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) in truth; really: re (vera), reapse (opp. specie)
    • (ambiguous) to form a plan, make a resolution: consilium capere, inire (de aliqua re, with Gen. gerund., with Inf., more rarely ut)
    • (ambiguous) to be deterred from one's intention by something: a consilio deterreri aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to deliberate together (of a number of people): consilium habere (de aliqua re)
    • (ambiguous) to deliberate, consider (of individuals): consultare or deliberare (de aliqua re)
    • (ambiguous) to give a person the advantage of one's advice (and actual support): aliquem consilio (et re) iuvare
    • (ambiguous) after mature deliberation: re diligenter considerata, perpensa
    • (ambiguous) what is the meaning of this: quid hoc rei est?
    • (ambiguous) to no purpose; ineffectually: infecta re (Liv. 9. 32)
    • (ambiguous) to retard, delay a thing: moram alicui rei afferre, inferre, facere
    • (ambiguous) to remember a thing perfectly: memoriam alicuius rei tenere
    • (ambiguous) to recall a thing to one's recollection: memoriam alicuius rei renovare, revocare (redintegrare)
    • (ambiguous) to recall to mind a thing or person: memoriam alicuius rei repetere
    • (ambiguous) to picture to oneself again: memoriam alicuius rei repraesentare (opp. memoriam alicuius rei deponere, abicere)
    • (ambiguous) to retain the recollection of a thing: memoriam alicuius rei conservare, retinere
    • (ambiguous) the memory of this will never fade from my mind: numquam ex animo meo memoria illius rei discedet
    • (ambiguous) to win renown amongst posterity by some act: nomen suum posteritati aliqua re commendare, propagare, prodere
    • (ambiguous) I forget something: oblivio alicuius rei me capit
    • (ambiguous) to make a person forget a thing: aliquem in oblivionem alicuius rei adducere (pass. in oblivionem venire)
    • (ambiguous) the recollection of a thing has been entirely lost: memoria alicuius rei excidit, abiit, abolevit
    • (ambiguous) to be forgotten, pass into oblivion: memoria alicuius rei obscuratur, obliteratur, evanescit
    • (ambiguous) to be forgotten, pass into oblivion: in oblivione iacēre (of persons)
    • (ambiguous) to have had great experience in a thing: magnum usum in aliqua re habere
    • (ambiguous) to acquire knowledge of a subject: scientiam alicuius rei consequi
    • (ambiguous) to teach some one letters: erudire aliquem artibus, litteris (but erudire aliquem in iure civili, in re militari)
    • (ambiguous) to make progress in a subject: in aliqua re progressus facere, proficere, progredi
    • (ambiguous) to obtain a result in something: aliquid efficere, consequi in aliqua re (De Or. 1. 33. 152)
    • (ambiguous) to have as authority for a thing: auctorem aliquem habere alicuius rei
    • (ambiguous) to give advice, directions, about a matter: praecepta dare, tradere de aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) philosophy is neglected, at low ebb: philosophia (neglecta) iacet (vid. sect. VII. 1, note iacēre...)
    • (ambiguous) to teac: tradere (aliquid de aliqua re)
    • (ambiguous) to make an obscure notion clear by means of definition: involutae rei notitiam definiendo aperire (Or. 33. 116)
    • (ambiguous) to be closely connected with a thing: cohaerere, coniunctum esse cum aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) a proof of this is that..: argumento huic rei est, quod
    • (ambiguous) to derive an argument from a thing: argumentum ducere, sumere ex aliqua re or petere ab aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to draw a conclusion from a thing: concludere, colligere, efficere, cogere ex aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to discuss, investigate a subject scientifically: disputare (de aliqua re, ad aliquid)
    • (ambiguous) to insist on a point: tenere aliquid; stare in aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) all agree on this point: omnes (uno ore) in hac re consentiunt
    • (ambiguous) to agree in fact but not in word: re concinere, verbis discrepare
    • (ambiguous) a twofold tradition prevails on this subject: duplex est memoria de aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) in everything nature defies imitation: in omni re vincit imitationem veritas
    • (ambiguous) to give an account of a thing (either orally or in writing): exponere aliquid or de aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to go deeply into a matter, discuss it fully: multum, nimium esse (in aliqua re) (De Or. 2. 4. 17)
    • (ambiguous) to speak at great length on a subject, discuss very fully: fusius, uberius, copiosius disputare, dicere de aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) my zeal for a thing has led me too far: studio alicuius rei provectus sum
    • (ambiguous) to go a long way back (in narrative): longe, alte (longius, altius) repetere (either absolute or ab aliqua re)
    • (ambiguous) to let those present fix any subject they like for discussion: ponere iubere, qua de re quis audire velit (Fin. 2. 1. 1)
    • (ambiguous) nominally; really: verbo, nomine; re, re quidem vera
    • (ambiguous) to speak on a subject: verba facere (de aliqua re, apud aliquem)
    • (ambiguous) we have no expression for that: huic rei deest apud nos vocabulum
    • (ambiguous) to be used in speaking of a thing: in aliqua re dici
    • (ambiguous) to be moved by a thing: aliqua re moveri, commoveri
    • (ambiguous) to take pleasure in a thing: laetitiam capere or percipere ex aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to take pleasure in a thing: delectari aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) I am pained, vexed, sorry: doleo aliquid, aliqua re, de and ex aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to be vexed about a thing: dolorem capere (percipere) ex aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) not to trouble oneself about a thing: non laborare de aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to be bowed down, prostrated by grief: aegritudine afflictum, debilitatum esse, iacēre
    • (ambiguous) to be in great trouble, affliction: in sordibus luctuque iacēre
    • (ambiguous) to feel sorrow about a thing: luctum percipere ex aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to be proud, arrogant by reason of something: inflatum, elatum esse aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to be in suspense, waiting for a thing: exspectatione alicuius rei pendēre (animi) (Leg. Agr. 2. 25. 66)
    • (ambiguous) to pardon some one: alicui veniam dare (alicuius rei)
    • (ambiguous) to long for a thing, yearn for it: desiderio alicuius rei teneri, affici (more strongly flagrare, incensum esse)
    • (ambiguous) to have enthusiasm for a person or thing: studio ardere alicuius or alicuius rei (De Or. 2. 1. 1)
    • (ambiguous) to make some one enthusiastic for a thing: studio alicuius rei aliquem incendere
    • (ambiguous) to make some one believe a thing: fidem alicuius rei facere alicui
    • (ambiguous) to believe in, trust in a thing: fidem tribuere, adiungere alicui rei
    • (ambiguous) to put confidence in some one: confidere alicui (but aliqua re)
    • (ambiguous) to have great confidence in a thing: fiduciam (alicuius rei) habere
    • (ambiguous) to confirm, ratify, sanction something: fidem addere alicui rei
    • (ambiguous) to make a thing credible: fidem facere, afferre alicui rei (opp. demere, de-, abrogare fidem)
    • (ambiguous) to be answerable for a person, a thing: praestare aliquem, aliquid, de aliqua re or Acc. c. Inf.
    • (ambiguous) to be suspected of a thing: suspicionem alicuius rei habere
    • (ambiguous) a suspicion falls on some one: suspicio (alicuius rei) cadit in aliquem, pertinet ad aliquem
    • (ambiguous) to have no presentiment of a thing: a suspicione alicuius rei abhorrere
    • (ambiguous) to incur a person's hatred: invidiam colligere (aliqua re)
    • (ambiguous) to glut one's hatred: odium explere aliqua re (Liv. 4. 32)
    • (ambiguous) the revolting nature of an action: indignitas, atrocitas rei (Mur. 25. 51)
    • (ambiguous) to revenge oneself for a thing: ulcisci aliquid, poenas alicuius rei expetere
    • (ambiguous) to revenge oneself on another for a thing or on some one's behalf: ulcisci aliquem pro aliquo or pro aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to revenge oneself on another for a thing or on some one's behalf: poenas alicuius or alicuius rei repetere ab aliquo
    • (ambiguous) to be fired with desire of a thing: cupiditate alicuius rei accensum, inflammatum esse
    • (ambiguous) to have an ardent longing for a thing: cupiditate alicuius rei ardere, flagrare
    • (ambiguous) to be the slave of one's desires: cupiditatibus servire, pārēre
    • (ambiguous) to be carried away by something: praecipitem ferri aliqua re (Verr. 5. 46. 121)
    • (ambiguous) to feel hurt by something: offendi aliqua re (animus offenditur)
    • (ambiguous) to take a false step in a thing; to commit an indiscretion: offendere in aliqua re (Cluent. 36. 98)
    • (ambiguous) to have the appearance of something: speciem alicuius rei habere
    • (ambiguous) to give the impression of...; have the outward aspect of..: speciem alicuius rei praebere
    • (ambiguous) apparently; to look at: per speciem (alicuius rei)
    • (ambiguous) under pretext, pretence of..: per simulationem, simulatione alicuius rei
    • (ambiguous) to have an inclination for a thing: studere alicui rei, studiosum esse alicuius rei
    • (ambiguous) to have an inclination for a thing: studio alicuius rei teneri
    • (ambiguous) to have an inclination for a thing: propensum, proclivem esse ad aliquid (opp. alienum, aversum esse, abhorrere ab aliqua re)
    • (ambiguous) to set a limit to a thing: modum facere, statuere, constituere alicui rei or alicuius rei
    • (ambiguous) to measure something by the standard of something else; to make something one's criterion: metiri, ponderare, aestimare, iudicare aliquid (ex) aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to show moderation in a matter: moderationem, modum adhibere in aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to come into the possession of something: in possessionem alicuius rei venire
    • (ambiguous) to take forcible possession of a thing: in possessionem alicuius rei invadere
    • (ambiguous) to give up a thing to some one else: possessione alicuius rei cedere alicui (Mil. 27. 75)
    • (ambiguous) to earn a livelihood by something: victum aliqua re quaerere
    • (ambiguous) to turn the conversation on to a certain subject: sermonem inferre de aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) the conversation turned on..: sermo incidit de aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) the conversation began with..: sermo ortus est ab aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to converse, talk with a person on a subject: sermonem habere cum aliquo de aliqua re (De Am. 1. 3)
    • (ambiguous) to congratulate a person on something: gratulari alicui aliquid or de aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) accustomed to a thing: assuefactus or assuetus aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to transact, settle a matter with some one: transigere aliquid (de aliqua re) cum aliquo or inter se
    • (ambiguous) to fix a price for a thing: pretium alicui rei statuere, constituere (Att. 13. 22)
    • (ambiguous) to devote money to a purpose: pecuniam insumere in aliquid or consumere in aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to put money in an undertaking: pecuniam collocare in aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to have a large income from a thing (e.g. from mines): magnas pecunias ex aliqua re (e.g. ex metallis) facere
    • (ambiguous) to go through accounts, make a valuation of a thing: rationem alicuius rei inire, subducere
    • (ambiguous) the accounts balance: ratio alicuius rei constat (convenit, par est)
    • (ambiguous) to compute the total of anything: summam facere alicuius rei
    • (ambiguous) to render count of a matter; to pass it for audit: rationem alicuius rei reddere
    • (ambiguous) to demand an account, an audit of a matter: rationem alicuius rei reposcere aliquem or ab aliquo
    • (ambiguous) to demand an account, an audit of a matter: rationem ab aliquo reptere de aliqua re (Cluent. 37. 104)
    • (ambiguous) to make profit out of a thing: lucrum facere (opp. damnum facere) ex aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) want of corn; scarcity in the corn-market: inopia (opp. copia) rei frumentariae
    • (ambiguous) the constitution: forma rei publicae
    • (ambiguous) at the time of a most satisfactory government: optima re publica
    • (ambiguous) to have the management of the state: rei publicae praeesse
    • (ambiguous) to hold the reins of government: ad gubernacula (metaph. only in plur.) rei publicae sedere
    • (ambiguous) to hold the reins of government: clavum rei publicae tenere
    • (ambiguous) to hold the reins of government: gubernacula rei publicae tractare
    • (ambiguous) to hold the first position in the state: principem in re publica locum obtinere
    • (ambiguous) to take part in politics: in re publica or in rebus publicis versari
    • (ambiguous) to take no part in politics: rei publicae deesse (opp. adesse)
    • (ambiguous) to retire from public life: a re publica recedere
    • (ambiguous) to further the common weal: saluti rei publicae non deesse
    • (ambiguous) for political reasons: rei publicae causa (Sest. 47. 101)
    • (ambiguous) for the advantage of the state; in the interests of the state: e re publica (opp. contra rem p.)
    • (ambiguous) the welfare of the state: summa res publica (or summa rei publicae)
    • (ambiguous) the interests of the state: commoda publica or rei publicae rationes
    • (ambiguous) to further the public interests: rei publicae rationibus or simply rei publicae consulere
    • (ambiguous) to consider a thing from a political point of view: ad rei publicae rationes aliquid referre
    • (ambiguous) to devote one's every thought to the state's welfare: omnes curas in rei publicae salute defigere (Phil. 14. 5. 13)
    • (ambiguous) to devote oneself body and soul to the good of the state: totum et animo et corpore in salutem rei publicae se conferre
    • (ambiguous) to have the good of the state at heart: bene, optime sentire de re publica
    • (ambiguous) to have the good of the state at heart: omnia de re publica praeclara atque egregia sentire
    • (ambiguous) statesmen: viri rerum civilium, rei publicae gerendae periti or viri in re publica prudentes
    • (ambiguous) an experienced politician: homo in re publica exercitatus
    • (ambiguous) to possess great political insight: plus in re publica videre
    • (ambiguous) to foresee political events long before: longe prospicere futuros casus rei publicae (De Amic. 12. 40)
    • (ambiguous) a man's policy is aiming at, directed towards..: alicuius in re publica or capessendae rei publicae consilia eo spectant, ut...
    • (ambiguous) banished from public life: rei publicae muneribus orbatus
    • (ambiguous) to strive to gain popular favour by certain means: ventum popularem quendam (in aliqua re) quaerere
    • (ambiguous) to be politically annihilated: iacēre (vid. sect. VII. 1, note iacēre...)
    • (ambiguous) a political ally: consiliorum in re publica socius
    • (ambiguous) an independent spirit: a partibus rei publicae animus liber (Sall. Cat. 4. 2)
    • (ambiguous) to have the same political opinions: idem de re publica sentire
    • (ambiguous) to hold different views in politics: ab aliquo in re publica dissentire
    • (ambiguous) owing to political dissension: ex rei publicae dissensione
    • (ambiguous) revolution: conversio rei publicae (Div. 2. 2. 6)
    • (ambiguous) to betray the interests of the state: a re publica deficere
    • (ambiguous) to endanger the existence of the state: statum rei publicae convellere
    • (ambiguous) to establish oneself as despot, tyrant by some means: tyrannidem sibi parere aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to appeal to the plebeian tribunes against a praetor's decision: appellare tribunos plebis (in aliqua re a praetore) (Liv. 2. 55)
    • (ambiguous) to consult the senators on a matter: patres (senatum) consulere de aliqua re (Sall. Iug. 28)
    • (ambiguous) what is your opinion: quid de ea re fieri placet?
    • (ambiguous) to hold an inquiry into a matter: quaerere aliquid or de aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to examine a person, a matter: quaestionem habere de aliquo, de aliqua re or in aliquem
    • (ambiguous) to catch a person, find him out: deprehendere aliquem (in aliqua re)
    • (ambiguous) to cite a person to give evidence on a matter: aliquem testem alicuius rei (in aliquid) citare
    • (ambiguous) to charge some one with a capital offence: accusare aliquem rei capitalis (rerum capitalium)
    • (ambiguous) to decide on the conduct of the case: iudicare causam (de aliqua re)
    • (ambiguous) some one is to blame in a matter; it is some one's fault: culpa alicuius rei est in aliquo
    • (ambiguous) to bear the blame of a thing: culpam alicuius rei sustinere
    • (ambiguous) to punish some one: ulcisci aliquem (pro aliqua re)
    • (ambiguous) to be punished by some one (on account of a thing): poenas alicui pendere (alicuius rei)
    • (ambiguous) to suffer punishment: poenam (alicuius rei) ferre, perferre
    • (ambiguous) to be punished for a thing, expiate it: poenam luere (alicuius rei) (Sull. 27. 76)
    • (ambiguous) to atone for something by..: luere aliquid aliqua re (De Sen. 20)
    • (ambiguous) to look after the commissariat: rei frumentariae prospicere (B. G. 1. 23)
    • (ambiguous) to possess great experience in military matters: magnum usum in re militari habere (Sest. 5. 12)
    • (ambiguous) to have had no experience in war: rei militaris rudem esse
    • (ambiguous) not to be diffuse on such a well-known subject: ne in re nota et pervulgata multus sim
    • (ambiguous) this can be said of..., applies to..: hoc dici potest de aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) I have a few words to say on this: mihi quaedam dicenda sunt de hac re
    • (ambiguous) this shows, proves..: documento, indicio est (without demonstr. pron. but cui rei documento, indicio est)
  • res in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • res” in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  • res in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

res

  1. rafsi of respa.

Spanish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Latin rēs ‎(thing)

Noun[edit]

res f ‎(plural reses)

  1. head of quadrupedal cattle or game
  2. (Latin America) bovine animal

Etymology 2[edit]

Plural of re.

Noun[edit]

res m pl

  1. plural of re

Swedish[edit]

Verb[edit]

res

  1. imperative of resa