res

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See also: Res, rés, rês, res-, re's, Res., and řeš

Translingual[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Symbol[edit]

res

  1. (mathematical analysis) residue

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

res

  1. plural of re

Noun[edit]

res (plural reses)

  1. (Canada, US, informal) Clipping of reservation.
    Synonym: rez (Indian reserve or reservation)
  2. (Canada, South Africa) Clipping of residence.
  3. (computing) Clipping of resolution (of a computer display or image).
    Coordinate term: hi-res
    Can I get that in a higher res?
  4. Clipping of reservoir (from computer water cooling).
  5. (role-playing games) Clipping of resurrection.
    Can I get a res please?

Verb[edit]

res (third-person singular simple present reses, present participle ressing, simple past and past participle ressed)

  1. (role-playing games) short form of resurrect
    You have the skills, right? Res me please.

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin rēs (thing). Compare French rien.

Pronoun[edit]

res

  1. nothing
  2. (in negative sentences) anything
    • 2019 August 11, Gemma Sardà, “El meu veí el músic”, in La Vanguardia[1]:
      No sembla mai que vagi a un lloc concret a fer-hi res de concret. Es passeja.
      It never seems like he's going to a concrete place to do anything concrete there. He strolls.
Alternative forms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

res

  1. plural of re

Further reading[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin rēs (thing)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

res f (plural reses)

  1. head of quadrupedal cattle or game
  2. flock, herd; cattle
    • 1355, E. Cal Pardo (ed.), Colección diplomática medieval do arquivo da catedral de Mondoñedo. Santiago: Consello da Cultura Galega, page 168:
      os quaes me pagastes en dineiros et en res
      which you paid me in money and in cattle

Pronoun[edit]

res

  1. (rare or dated) nothing (in negative sentences)
    Non sei res diso.I know nothing about it.
    Synonym: nada
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Plural of re.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

res m pl

  1. plural of re

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese rẽes (13th century, Cantigas de Santa Maria), from Latin rēnes (kidneys). Cognate with Template:kw.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

res m pl

  1. small of the back
    • 1409, G. Pérez Barcala (ed.), A tradución galega do "Liber de medicina equorum" de Joradanus Ruffus. Santiago de Compostela: USC, page 191:
      reerás primeiramente os lombos ou as rẽes do cavalo
      you will first shave the horse's back and the smalls of the back
    Synonyms: cadrís, lombo

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • re_es” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • rẽes” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • res” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • res” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • res” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

For the expected *rīs, remodelled on a new oblique stem *rēj-, from Proto-Italic *reis, from Proto-Indo-European *reh₁ís (wealth, goods).

Cognate to Old Persian [Term?] (/rāy-/, paradise, wealth), Avestan 𐬭𐬁𐬫-(rāy-, paradise, wealth), Sanskrit रै (raí, property. wealth), रयि (rayí, stuff, material, property, goods).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rēs f (genitive reī); fifth declension

  1. thing, object, stuff
    Dīxit duās rēs eī rubōrī fuisse.
    He said that two things had abashed him.
  2. matter, issue, subject, topic
    • a. 149 BC, Cato the Elder (attributed quote)
      Rem tenē, verba sequentur
      Grasp the matter, the words will follow
  3. affair, event
  4. story, history
  5. state, republic, commonwealth
    • c. early 5th century AD, attributed to Ennius by Augustinus in De Civitate Dei; Book II, Chapter XXI
      Mōribus antīquīs rēs stat Rōmāna virīsque.
      The Roman state remains by means of its ancient customs and heroes.
    novae rēsa revolution
  6. deed
  7. circumstances

Declension[edit]

Fifth-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative rēs rēs
Genitive reī rērum
Dative reī rēbus
Accusative rem rēs
Ablative rēbus
Vocative rēs rēs

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Old Occitan: g(r)anren, g(r)anre (many), aldres (something else)
  • Occitan: res (-thing, -body) (with non or pas), ren, rèn (person; something)
  • Old Portuguese: ren, rem (creature; thing)
  • Old Portuguese: algorrem (something)
  • Sardinian: rese, arrèse (head of cattle, animal) (Logudorian), arrèsi, erèxi, resi, resa (Campidanian)
  • Old Spanish: res (head of cattle, animal; thing, nothing; person)
    • Spanish: res (head of cattle, animal)

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • res in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • res in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • res in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • res in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the universe: rerum or mundi universitas
    • creation; nature: rerum natura or simply natura
    • God is the Creator of the world: deus est mundi procreator (not creator), aedificator, fabricator, opifex rerum
    • the elements: elementa; initia or principia rerum
    • the elements and first beginnings: elementa et tamquam semina rerum
    • picture to yourselves the circumstances: ante oculos vestros (not vobis) res gestas proponite
    • the world of sense, the visible world: res sensibus or oculis subiectae (De Fin. 5. 12. 36)
    • the world of sense, the visible world: res quas oculis cernimus
    • the world of sense, the visible world: res externae
    • human life: res humanae or simply res
    • that is the way of the world; such is life: haec est rerum humanarum condicio
    • to despise earthly things: res externas or humanas despicere
    • to feel superior to the affairs of life: res humanas infra se positas arbitrari
    • my position is considerably improved; my prospects are brighter: res meae meliore loco, in meliore causa sunt
    • under such unfavourable circumstances: in tanta rerum (temporum) iniquitate
    • a critical position; a hopeless state of affairs: res dubiae, perditae, afflictae
    • the facts are these; the matter stands thus: res ita est, ita (sic) se habet
    • circumstances make this necessary; the exigencies of the case are these: res (ita) fert
    • the matter has gone so far that...; the state of affairs is such that..: res eo or in eum locum deducta est, ut...
    • how are you getting on: quo loco res tuae sunt?
    • whatever happens; in any case: utcumque res ceciderit
    • what will be the issue, end, consequence of the matter: quorsum haec res cadet or evadet?
    • the result has surprised me; I was not prepared for this development: res aliter cecidit ac putaveram
    • cause and effect: causae rerum et consecutiones
    • concatenation, interdependence of causes: rerum causae aliae ex aliis nexae
    • important results are often produced by trivial causes: ex parvis saepe magnarum rerum momenta pendent
    • in many respects; in many points: multis rebus or locis
    • as regards the rest; otherwise: ceteris rebus (not cetera)
    • from every point of view; looked at in every light: omni ex parte; in omni genere; omnibus rebus
    • the matter is still undecided; it is an open question: res integra est
    • I have not yet committed myself: res mihi integra est
    • to put the matter entirely in some one's hands: omnium rerum arbitrium alicui permittere
    • to be puffed up by success; to be made arrogant by prosperity: rebus secundis efferri
    • when life runs smoothly: in rebus prosperis et ad voluntatem fluentibus
    • misfortune, adversity: res adversae, afflictae, perditae
    • the position is very critical: res in summo discrimine versatur
    • affairs are desperate; we are reduced to extremeties: res ad extremum casum perducta est
    • to assist, stand by a person: adesse alicui or alicuius rebus (opp. deesse)
    • to take measures for one's safety; to look after one's own interests: suis rebus or sibi consulere
    • I console myself with..: haec (illa) res me consolatur
    • to live in great affluence: in omnium rerum abundantia vivere
    • to be reduced to (abject) poverty: ad egestatem, ad inopiam (summam omnium rerum) redigi
    • to demand restitution, satisfaction: res repetere
    • to give restitution, satisfaction: res restituere
    • a thing meets with my approval: res mihi probatur
    • I express my approval of a thing: res a me probatur
    • I blame this in you; I censure you for this: hoc in te reprehendo (not ob eam rem)
    • the matter involves much labour and fatigue: res est multi laboris et sudoris
    • to have all one's trouble for nothing: rem actam or simply actum agere (proverb.)
    • to be inattentive: alias res or aliud agere
    • creatures of the imagination: rerum imagines
    • creatures of the imagination: res cogitatione fictae or depictae
    • to study the commonplace: cogitationes in res humiles abicere (De Amic. 9. 32) (Opp. alte spectare, ad altiora tendere, altum, magnificum, divinum suspicere)
    • after mature deliberation: omnibus rebus circumspectis
    • the matter tends towards..., has this object.[1: res eo spectat, ut
    • there seems a prospect of armed violence; things look like violence: res spectat ad vim (arma)
    • to have had practical experience: in rebus atque in usu versatum esse
    • varied, manifold experience: multarum rerum usus
    • we know from experience: usu rerum (vitae, vitae communis) edocti sumus
    • everyday experience tells us this: res ipsa, usus rerum (cotidie) docet
    • to have had no experience of the world: (rerum) imperitum esse
    • to be well-informed, erudite: multarum rerum cognitione imbutum esse (opp. litterarum or eruditionis expertem esse or [rerum] rudem esse)
    • to borrow instances from history: exempla petere, repetere a rerum gestarum memoria or historiarum (annalium, rerum gestarum) monumentis
    • examples taken from Roman (Greek) history: exempla a rerum Romanarum (Graecarum) memoria petita
    • moral science; ethics: philosophia, in qua de bonis rebus et malis, deque hominum vita et moribus disputatur
    • theoretical, speculative philosophy: philosophia, quae in rerum contemplatione versatur, or quae artis praeceptis continetur
    • to define a thing: rem (res) definire
    • systematic succession, concatenation: continuatio seriesque rerum, ut alia ex alia nexa et omnes inter se aptae colligataeque sint (N. D. 1. 4. 9)
    • to reunite disconnected elements: rem dissolutam conglutinare, coagmentare
    • I have a point to discuss with you: res mihi tecum est
    • the very facts of the case show this: res ipsa docet
    • the matter speaks for itself: res ipsa (pro me apud te) loquitur
    • the question is settled, finished: res confecta est
    • Roman history (i.e. the events in it): res Romanae
    • Roman history (i.e. the events in it): res gestae Romanorum
    • Roman history (i.e. the exposition, representation of it by writers): historia Romana or rerum Romanarum historia
    • Roman history (as tradition): memoria rerum Romanarum
    • to write a history of Rome: res populi Romani perscribere
    • an historian: rerum scriptor
    • an historian: rerum auctor (as authority)
    • we read in history: apud rerum scriptores scriptum videmus, scriptum est
    • ancient history: rerum veterum memoria
    • universal history: omnis memoria, omnis memoria aetatum, temporum, civitatum or omnium rerum, gentium, temporum, saeculorum memoria
    • historic truth: historiae, rerum fides
    • an acknowledged historical fact: res historiae fide comprobata
    • genuine historical truth: incorrupta rerum fides
    • to be well versed in Roman history: memoriam rerum gestarum (rerum Romanarum) tenere
    • to narrate events in the order of their occurrence: res temporum ordine servato narrare
    • an astronomer: spectator siderum, rerum caelestium or astrologus
    • to celebrate some one's exploits in song: alicuius res gestas versibus ornare, celebrare
    • graphic depiction: rerum sub aspectum paene subiectio (De Or. 3. 53. 202)
    • to represent a thing dramatically: sic exponere aliquid, quasi agatur res (non quasi narretur)
    • to dwell only on the main points: res summas attingere
    • to explain a matter briefly, in a few words (not paucis verbis): rem paucis absolvere (Sall. Iug. 17. 2)
    • the circumstances are described in language worthy of them: rebus ipsis par est oratio
    • the circumstances are described in language worthy of them: rebus verba respondent
    • to detail the whole history of an affair: ordine narrare, quomodo res gesta sit
    • I have abundance to say: res (opp. verba) mihi suppetit
    • to arrange and divide the subject-matter: res componere ac digerere
    • the arrangement of the subject-matter: dispositio rerum (De Inv. 1. 7. 9)
    • abundance of material: materia rerum et copia uberrima
    • a theme, subject proposed for discussion: res proposita
    • to come back to the point: ad rem redire
    • the question at issue: res, de qua nunc quaerimus, quaeritur
    • to be contented: rebus suis, sorte sua contentum esse
    • to despair of one's position: desperare suis rebus
    • absolute despair; a hopeless situation: desperatio rerum (omnium) (Catil. 2. 11. 25)
    • his enthusiasm has abated, cooled down: ardor animi resēdit, consedit
    • there is something repulsive about the thing: res habet aliquid offensionis
    • to measure something by the standard of something else; to make something one's criterion: dirigere or referre aliquid ad aliquam rem
    • ritual; ceremonial: sacra, res divinae, religiones, caerimoniae
    • to take part in divine service (of the priest): rebus divinis interesse (B. G. 6. 13)
    • to sacrifice: rem divinam facere (dis)
    • after having performed the sacrifice (with due ritual): rebus divinis (rite) perpetratis
    • after having duly taken the auspices: auspicato (rem gerere, urbem condere)
    • a comfortably-furnished house: domus necessariis rebus instructa
    • to keep house: rem domesticam, familiarem administrare, regere, curare
    • to possess means, to be well off: rem or opes habere, bona possidere, in bonis esse
    • to manage one's affairs, household, property well or ill: rem bene (male) gerere (vid. sect. XVI. 10a)
    • to manage one's affairs, household, property well or ill: rem familiarem tueri
    • to neglect, mismanage one's household matters: rem familiarem neglegere
    • movable, personal property: res, quae moveri possunt; res moventes (Liv. 5. 25. 6)
    • the necessaries of life: res ad vitam necessariae
    • things indispensable to a life of comfort: res ad victum cultumque necessariae
    • to be abandoned to a life of excess: omnium rerum copia diffluere
    • to squander all one's property: dissipare rem familiarem (suam)
    • to separate from, divorce (of the man): aliquam suas res sibi habere iubere (Phil. 2. 28. 69)
    • a thing is going out of use, becoming obsolete: res obsolescit
    • to settle, finish a transaction: negotium (rem) conficere, absolvere
    • to have business relations with some one: contrahere rem or negotium cum aliquo (Cluent. 14. 41)
    • imports and exports: res, quae importantur et exportantur
    • finance; money-matters: res nummaria or pecuniaria
    • to rear stock: rem pecuariam facere, exercere (cf. Varr R. R. 2. 1)
    • to give the state a constitution: rem publicam constituere
    • to give the state a constitution: rem publicam legibus et institutis temperare (Tusc. 1. 1. 2)
    • to have no constitution, be in anarchy: nullam habere rem publicam
    • to restore the ancient constitution: rem publicam in pristinum statum restituere
    • the Republic: libera res publica, liber populus
    • to govern, administer the state: rem publicam gerere, administrare, regere, tractare, gubernare
    • to devote oneself to politics, a political career: accedere, se conferre ad rem publicam
    • to devote oneself to politics, a political career: rem publicam capessere (Off. 1. 21. 71)
    • (ambiguous) to take part in politics: in re publica or in rebus publicis versari
    • to defend, strengthen the state: rem publicam tueri, stabilire
    • the state is secure: res publica stat (opp. iacet)
    • to aggrandise, extend the power of the state: rem publicam augere, amplificare
    • (ambiguous) for the advantage of the state; in the interests of the state: e re publica (opp. contra rem p.)
    • (ambiguous) the welfare of the state: summa res publica (or summa rei publicae)
    • to devote one's every thought to the state's welfare: in rem publicam omni cogitatione curaque incumbere (Fam. 10. 1. 2)
    • to devote one's every thought to the state's welfare: omnes curas et cogitationes in rem publicam conferre
    • (ambiguous) statesmen: viri rerum civilium, rei publicae gerendae periti or viri in re publica prudentes
    • statesmen: principes rem publicam administrantes or simply principes
    • political questions: res civiles
    • to leave a matter to be decided by popular vote: multitudinis suffragiis rem permittere
    • to throw oneself heart and soul into politics: studio ad rem publicam ferri
    • democracy: imperium populi or populare, civitas or res publica popularis
    • a demagogue, agitator: plebis dux, vulgi turbator, civis turbulentus, civis rerum novarum cupidus
    • revolutionists: homines seditiosi, turbulenti or novarum rerum cupidi
    • to hold revolutionary opinions: novis rebus studere
    • to hold revolutionary opinions: novarum rerum cupidum esse
    • to plot a revolution: novas res moliri (Verr. 2. 125)
    • to foster revolutionary projects: contra rem publicam sentire
    • to be guilty of high treason: contra rem publicam facere
    • to shake the stability of the state: rem publicam labefactare
    • to throw the state into confusion: rem publicam perturbare
    • to damage the state: rem publicam vexare
    • to completely overthrow the government, the state: rem publicam funditus evertere
    • general confusion; anarchy: perturbatio omnium rerum (Flacc. 37)
    • things seem tending towards an interregnum: res fluit ad interregnum
    • amnesty (ἀμνηρτία): ante actarum (praeteritarum) rerum oblivio or simply oblivio
    • to confer supreme power on a person: imperium, rerum summam deferre alicui
    • to give some one unlimited power in state affairs: rem publicam alicui permittere
    • (1) to usurp supreme power, (2) to be in a position of power: rerum potiri
    • to deliver the state from a tyranny: rem publicam in libertatem vindicare a or ex dominatione
    • to enjoy absolute immunity: immunitatem omnium rerum habere
    • to enrich oneself at the expense of the state: rem publicam quaestui habere
    • an interregnum ensues: res ad interregnum venit or adducitur
    • let the consuls take measures for the protection of the state: videant or dent operam consules, ne quid res publica detrimenti capiat (Catil. 1. 2. 4)
    • a matter is referred (for decision) from the senate to the people: a senatu res ad populum reicitur
    • (ambiguous) to charge some one with a capital offence: accusare aliquem rei capitalis (rerum capitalium)
    • to rescind a decision: res iudicatas rescindere (Cic. Sull. 22. 63)
    • to look after the commissariat: rem frumentariam comparare, providere
    • to perform heroic exploits: magnas res gerere
    • a success; a glorious feat of arms: res fortiter feliciterque gesta
    • a success; a glorious feat of arms: res bene gesta
    • exploits in war; brilliant actions: res gestae
    • matters have reached the fighting-stage: res ad arma venit
    • to demand satisfaction, restitution: res repetere (ab aliquo) (Off. 1. 11. 36)
    • to make restitution: res reddere (alicui) (cf. sect. V. 11)
    • to refer a matter to a council of war: rem ad consilium deferre
    • to win, lose a fight (of the commander): rem (bene, male) gerere (vid. sect. XII. 2, note rem gerere...)
    • the position is critical: res est in periculo, in summo discrimine
    • the triarii must now fight (proverbially = we are reduced to extremities): res ad triarios redit (Liv. 8. 8)
    • to fight with swords at close quarters: gladio comminus (opp. eminus) rem gerere
    • to throw down the javelins (pila) and fight with the sword: omissis pilis gladiis rem gerere
    • swords must now decide the day: res ad gladios vēnit
    • swords must now decide the day: res gladiis geri coepta est
    • the fighting is now at close quarters: res ad manus venit
    • to have a powerful navy: rebus maritimis multum valere
    • in short; to be brief: ut paucis (rem) absolvam
    • but this is not to the point: sed hoc nihil (sane) ad rem
    • you have hit the nail on the head: rem acu tetigisti
    • it is so: ita res est
    • the matter stands so (otherwise): res ita (aliter) se habet
    • (ambiguous) Gaul is bounded by the Rhone.[TR1: Gallia Rhodano continetur (vid. sect. V. 4., note contineri aliqua re...)
    • (ambiguous) to be on horseback: in equo sedere; equo insidēre
    • (ambiguous) to have time for a thing: tempus habere alicui rei
    • (ambiguous) to pass one's time in doing something: tempus consumere in aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to waste time on something: tempus terere, conterere (in) aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to devote time to anything: tempus tribuere alicui rei
    • (ambiguous) in the time of the Republic: libera re publica
    • (ambiguous) to make not the slightest effort; not to stir a finger: manum non vertere alicuius rei causa
    • (ambiguous) to make oneself conspicuous: conspici, conspicuum esse aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to feast one's eyes with the sight of..: oculos pascere aliqua re (also simply pasci aliqua re)
    • (ambiguous) to turn one's gaze away from an object: oculos deicere, removere ab aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to prostrate oneself before a person: ad pedes alicuius iacēre, stratum esse (stratum iacēre)
    • (ambiguous) to be seriously ill: vehementer, graviter aeogratare, iacēre
    • (ambiguous) to watch by a sick man's bedside: assidēre aegroto (Liv. 25. 26)
    • (ambiguous) the case is exactly similar (entirely different): eadem (longe alia) est huius rei ratio
    • (ambiguous) according to circumstances: pro re (nata), pro tempore
    • (ambiguous) according to circumstances: pro tempore et pro re
    • (ambiguous) to begin with a thing: initium capere; incipere ab aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to commence a thing: initium facere, ducere, sumere (alicuius rei)
    • (ambiguous) to finish, complete, fulfil, accomplish a thing: finem facere alicuius rei
    • (ambiguous) to finish, complete, fulfil, accomplish a thing: finem imponere, afferre, constituere alicui rei
    • (ambiguous) the motive, cause, is to be found in..: causa posita est in aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) the motive, cause, is to be found in..: causa repetenda est ab aliqua re (not quaerenda)
    • (ambiguous) extraneous causes: causae extrinsecus allatae (opp. in ipsa re positae)
    • (ambiguous) to originate in, arise from: ex aliqua re nasci, manare
    • (ambiguous) to originate in, arise from: ab aliqua re proficisci
    • (ambiguous) to accrue in great abundance: ex aliqua re redundare (in or ad aliquid)
    • (ambiguous) untold advantages arise from a thing: utilitas efflorescit ex aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to have regard for; take into consideration: rationem habere alicuius rei
    • (ambiguous) in both cases; whichever way you look at it: in utraque re
    • (ambiguous) to depend upon a thing: positum, situm esse in aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to depend upon a thing: contineri aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to depend upon a thing: consistere in aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to depend upon a thing: pendēre ex aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) all depends on this; this is the decisive point: in ea re omnia vertuntur
    • (ambiguous) to be composed of; to consist of: constare ex aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) it is evident from..: cernitur (in) aliqua re (not ex aliqua re)
    • (ambiguous) the decision of the question rests with you: penes te arbitrium huius rei est
    • (ambiguous) to give a man the opportunity of doing a thing: occasionem alicui dare, praebere alicuius rei or ad aliquid faciendum
    • (ambiguous) to give a man the opportunity of doing a thing: facultatem alicui dare alicuius rei or ut possit...
    • (ambiguous) no opportunity of carrying out an object presents itself: nulla est facultas alicuius rei
    • (ambiguous) to be induced by a consideration: adduci aliqua re (ad aliquid or ut...)
    • (ambiguous) his crowning happiness is produced by a thing; the culminating point of his felicity is..: ad felicitatem (magnus) cumulus accedit ex aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to make trial of; to risk: periculum facere alicuius rei
    • (ambiguous) to comfort a man in a matter; to condole with him: consolari aliquem de aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to suffer from want of a thing: inopia alicuius rei laborare, premi
    • (ambiguous) to derive (great) profit , advantage from a thing: fructum (uberrimum) capere, percipere, consequi ex aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) (great) advantage accrues to me from this: fructus ex hac re redundant in or ad me
    • (ambiguous) to throw away, sacrifice: iacturam alicuius rei facere
    • (ambiguous) to balance a loss by anything: damnum compensare cum aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to find favour with some one; to get into their good graces: benevolentiam, favorem, voluntatem alicuius sibi conciliare or colligere (ex aliqua re)
    • (ambiguous) to show gratitude (in one's acts): gratiam alicui referre (meritam, debitam) pro aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to thank a person (in words): gratias alicui agere pro aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to consider of importance; to set much (some) store by a thing: multum (aliquid) alicui rei tribuere
    • (ambiguous) the stipulated reward for anything: pacta merces alicuius rei
    • (ambiguous) to expostulate with a person about a thing: conqueri, expostulare cum aliquo de aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to inform a person: certiorem facere aliquem (alicuius rei or de aliqua re)
    • (ambiguous) to mention a thing: mentionem facere alicuius rei or de aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to mention a thing incidentally, casually: mentionem inicere de aliqua re or Acc. c. Inf.
    • (ambiguous) to mention a thing incidentally, casually: in mentionem alicuius rei incidere
    • (ambiguous) to mention a thing incidentally, casually: mentio alicuius rei incidit
    • (ambiguous) to expend great labour on a thing: egregiam operam (multum, plus etc. operae) dare alicui rei
    • (ambiguous) to expend great labour on a thing: operam alicui rei tribuere, in aliquid conferre
    • (ambiguous) to exert oneself very energetically in a matter: multum operae ac laboris consumere in aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to apply oneself zealously, diligently to a thing: studium, industriam (not diligentiam) collocare, ponere in aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to exert oneself very considerably in a matter: desudare et elaborare in aliqua re (De Senect. 11. 38)
    • (ambiguous) to spare oneself the trouble of the voyage: labore supersedēre (itineris) (Fam. 4. 2. 4)
    • (ambiguous) to strain every nerve, do one's utmost in a matter: omnes nervos in aliqua re contendere
    • (ambiguous) to be engaged upon a matter: occupatum esse in aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to be engaged upon a matter: intentum esse alicui rei
    • (ambiguous) to spend one's leisure hours on an object: otiosum tempus consumere in aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to derive pleasure from a thing: voluptatem ex aliqua re capere or percipere
    • (ambiguous) to recruit oneself, seek relaxation: animum relaxare, reficere, recreare or simply se reficere, se recreare, refici, recreari (ex aliqua re)
    • (ambiguous) something comes into my mind: mihi in mentem venit alicuius rei
    • (ambiguous) to draw away some one's attention from a thing: alicuius animum ab aliqua re abducere
    • (ambiguous) to fix all one's thoughts on an object: mentem in aliqua re defigere
    • (ambiguous) to form a conception, notion of a thing: notionem or rationem alicuius rei in animo informare or animo concipere
    • (ambiguous) ideally, not really: cogitatione, non re
    • (ambiguous) to have formed an ideal notion of a thing: comprehensam quandam animo speciem (alicuius rei) habere
    • (ambiguous) to infer by comparison, judge one thing by another: coniecturam alicuius rei facere or capere ex aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) in truth; really: re (vera), reapse (opp. specie)
    • (ambiguous) to form a plan, make a resolution: consilium capere, inire (de aliqua re, with Gen. gerund., with Inf., more rarely ut)
    • (ambiguous) to be deterred from one's intention by something: a consilio deterreri aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to deliberate together (of a number of people): consilium habere (de aliqua re)
    • (ambiguous) to deliberate, consider (of individuals): consultare or deliberare (de aliqua re)
    • (ambiguous) to give a person the advantage of one's advice (and actual support): aliquem consilio (et re) iuvare
    • (ambiguous) after mature deliberation: re diligenter considerata, perpensa
    • (ambiguous) what is the meaning of this: quid hoc rei est?
    • (ambiguous) to no purpose; ineffectually: infecta re (Liv. 9. 32)
    • (ambiguous) to retard, delay a thing: moram alicui rei afferre, inferre, facere
    • (ambiguous) to remember a thing perfectly: memoriam alicuius rei tenere
    • (ambiguous) to recall a thing to one's recollection: memoriam alicuius rei renovare, revocare (redintegrare)
    • (ambiguous) to recall to mind a thing or person: memoriam alicuius rei repetere
    • (ambiguous) to picture to oneself again: memoriam alicuius rei repraesentare (opp. memoriam alicuius rei deponere, abicere)
    • (ambiguous) to retain the recollection of a thing: memoriam alicuius rei conservare, retinere
    • (ambiguous) the memory of this will never fade from my mind: numquam ex animo meo memoria illius rei discedet
    • (ambiguous) to win renown amongst posterity by some act: nomen suum posteritati aliqua re commendare, propagare, prodere
    • (ambiguous) I forget something: oblivio alicuius rei me capit
    • (ambiguous) to make a person forget a thing: aliquem in oblivionem alicuius rei adducere (pass. in oblivionem venire)
    • (ambiguous) the recollection of a thing has been entirely lost: memoria alicuius rei excidit, abiit, abolevit
    • (ambiguous) to be forgotten, pass into oblivion: memoria alicuius rei obscuratur, obliteratur, evanescit
    • (ambiguous) to be forgotten, pass into oblivion: in oblivione iacēre (of persons)
    • (ambiguous) to have had great experience in a thing: magnum usum in aliqua re habere
    • (ambiguous) to acquire knowledge of a subject: scientiam alicuius rei consequi
    • (ambiguous) to teach some one letters: erudire aliquem artibus, litteris (but erudire aliquem in iure civili, in re militari)
    • (ambiguous) to make progress in a subject: in aliqua re progressus facere, proficere, progredi
    • (ambiguous) to obtain a result in something: aliquid efficere, consequi in aliqua re (De Or. 1. 33. 152)
    • (ambiguous) to have as authority for a thing: auctorem aliquem habere alicuius rei
    • (ambiguous) to give advice, directions, about a matter: praecepta dare, tradere de aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) philosophy is neglected, at low ebb: philosophia (neglecta) iacet (vid. sect. VII. 1, note iacēre...)
    • (ambiguous) to teac: tradere (aliquid de aliqua re)
    • (ambiguous) to make an obscure notion clear by means of definition: involutae rei notitiam definiendo aperire (Or. 33. 116)
    • (ambiguous) to be closely connected with a thing: cohaerere, coniunctum esse cum aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) a proof of this is that..: argumento huic rei est, quod
    • (ambiguous) to derive an argument from a thing: argumentum ducere, sumere ex aliqua re or petere ab aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to draw a conclusion from a thing: concludere, colligere, efficere, cogere ex aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to discuss, investigate a subject scientifically: disputare (de aliqua re, ad aliquid)
    • (ambiguous) to insist on a point: tenere aliquid; stare in aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) all agree on this point: omnes (uno ore) in hac re consentiunt
    • (ambiguous) to agree in fact but not in word: re concinere, verbis discrepare
    • (ambiguous) a twofold tradition prevails on this subject: duplex est memoria de aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) in everything nature defies imitation: in omni re vincit imitationem veritas
    • (ambiguous) to give an account of a thing (either orally or in writing): exponere aliquid or de aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to go deeply into a matter, discuss it fully: multum, nimium esse (in aliqua re) (De Or. 2. 4. 17)
    • (ambiguous) to speak at great length on a subject, discuss very fully: fusius, uberius, copiosius disputare, dicere de aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) my zeal for a thing has led me too far: studio alicuius rei provectus sum
    • (ambiguous) to go a long way back (in narrative): longe, alte (longius, altius) repetere (either absolute or ab aliqua re)
    • (ambiguous) to let those present fix any subject they like for discussion: ponere iubere, qua de re quis audire velit (Fin. 2. 1. 1)
    • (ambiguous) nominally; really: verbo, nomine; re, re quidem vera
    • (ambiguous) to speak on a subject: verba facere (de aliqua re, apud aliquem)
    • (ambiguous) we have no expression for that: huic rei deest apud nos vocabulum
    • (ambiguous) to be used in speaking of a thing: in aliqua re dici
    • (ambiguous) to be moved by a thing: aliqua re moveri, commoveri
    • (ambiguous) to take pleasure in a thing: laetitiam capere or percipere ex aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to take pleasure in a thing: delectari aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) I am pained, vexed, sorry: doleo aliquid, aliqua re, de and ex aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to be vexed about a thing: dolorem capere (percipere) ex aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) not to trouble oneself about a thing: non laborare de aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to be bowed down, prostrated by grief: aegritudine afflictum, debilitatum esse, iacēre
    • (ambiguous) to be in great trouble, affliction: in sordibus luctuque iacēre
    • (ambiguous) to feel sorrow about a thing: luctum percipere ex aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to be proud, arrogant by reason of something: inflatum, elatum esse aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to be in suspense, waiting for a thing: exspectatione alicuius rei pendēre (animi) (Leg. Agr. 2. 25. 66)
    • (ambiguous) to pardon some one: alicui veniam dare (alicuius rei)
    • (ambiguous) to long for a thing, yearn for it: desiderio alicuius rei teneri, affici (more strongly flagrare, incensum esse)
    • (ambiguous) to have enthusiasm for a person or thing: studio ardere alicuius or alicuius rei (De Or. 2. 1. 1)
    • (ambiguous) to make some one enthusiastic for a thing: studio alicuius rei aliquem incendere
    • (ambiguous) to make some one believe a thing: fidem alicuius rei facere alicui
    • (ambiguous) to believe in, trust in a thing: fidem tribuere, adiungere alicui rei
    • (ambiguous) to put confidence in some one: confidere alicui (but aliqua re)
    • (ambiguous) to have great confidence in a thing: fiduciam (alicuius rei) habere
    • (ambiguous) to confirm, ratify, sanction something: fidem addere alicui rei
    • (ambiguous) to make a thing credible: fidem facere, afferre alicui rei (opp. demere, de-, abrogare fidem)
    • (ambiguous) to be answerable for a person, a thing: praestare aliquem, aliquid, de aliqua re or Acc. c. Inf.
    • (ambiguous) to be suspected of a thing: suspicionem alicuius rei habere
    • (ambiguous) a suspicion falls on some one: suspicio (alicuius rei) cadit in aliquem, pertinet ad aliquem
    • (ambiguous) to have no presentiment of a thing: a suspicione alicuius rei abhorrere
    • (ambiguous) to incur a person's hatred: invidiam colligere (aliqua re)
    • (ambiguous) to glut one's hatred: odium explere aliqua re (Liv. 4. 32)
    • (ambiguous) the revolting nature of an action: indignitas, atrocitas rei (Mur. 25. 51)
    • (ambiguous) to revenge oneself for a thing: ulcisci aliquid, poenas alicuius rei expetere
    • (ambiguous) to revenge oneself on another for a thing or on some one's behalf: ulcisci aliquem pro aliquo or pro aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to revenge oneself on another for a thing or on some one's behalf: poenas alicuius or alicuius rei repetere ab aliquo
    • (ambiguous) to be fired with desire of a thing: cupiditate alicuius rei accensum, inflammatum esse
    • (ambiguous) to have an ardent longing for a thing: cupiditate alicuius rei ardere, flagrare
    • (ambiguous) to be the slave of one's desires: cupiditatibus servire, pārēre
    • (ambiguous) to be carried away by something: praecipitem ferri aliqua re (Verr. 5. 46. 121)
    • (ambiguous) to feel hurt by something: offendi aliqua re (animus offenditur)
    • (ambiguous) to take a false step in a thing; to commit an indiscretion: offendere in aliqua re (Cluent. 36. 98)
    • (ambiguous) to have the appearance of something: speciem alicuius rei habere
    • (ambiguous) to give the impression of...; have the outward aspect of..: speciem alicuius rei praebere
    • (ambiguous) apparently; to look at: per speciem (alicuius rei)
    • (ambiguous) under pretext, pretence of..: per simulationem, simulatione alicuius rei
    • (ambiguous) to have an inclination for a thing: studere alicui rei, studiosum esse alicuius rei
    • (ambiguous) to have an inclination for a thing: studio alicuius rei teneri
    • (ambiguous) to have an inclination for a thing: propensum, proclivem esse ad aliquid (opp. alienum, aversum esse, abhorrere ab aliqua re)
    • (ambiguous) to set a limit to a thing: modum facere, statuere, constituere alicui rei or alicuius rei
    • (ambiguous) to measure something by the standard of something else; to make something one's criterion: metiri, ponderare, aestimare, iudicare aliquid (ex) aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to show moderation in a matter: moderationem, modum adhibere in aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to come into the possession of something: in possessionem alicuius rei venire
    • (ambiguous) to take forcible possession of a thing: in possessionem alicuius rei invadere
    • (ambiguous) to give up a thing to some one else: possessione alicuius rei cedere alicui (Mil. 27. 75)
    • (ambiguous) to earn a livelihood by something: victum aliqua re quaerere
    • (ambiguous) to turn the conversation on to a certain subject: sermonem inferre de aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) the conversation turned on..: sermo incidit de aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) the conversation began with..: sermo ortus est ab aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to converse, talk with a person on a subject: sermonem habere cum aliquo de aliqua re (De Am. 1. 3)
    • (ambiguous) to congratulate a person on something: gratulari alicui aliquid or de aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) accustomed to a thing: assuefactus or assuetus aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to transact, settle a matter with some one: transigere aliquid (de aliqua re) cum aliquo or inter se
    • (ambiguous) to fix a price for a thing: pretium alicui rei statuere, constituere (Att. 13. 22)
    • (ambiguous) to devote money to a purpose: pecuniam insumere in aliquid or consumere in aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to put money in an undertaking: pecuniam collocare in aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to have a large income from a thing (e.g. from mines): magnas pecunias ex aliqua re (e.g. ex metallis) facere
    • (ambiguous) to go through accounts, make a valuation of a thing: rationem alicuius rei inire, subducere
    • (ambiguous) the accounts balance: ratio alicuius rei constat (convenit, par est)
    • (ambiguous) to compute the total of anything: summam facere alicuius rei
    • (ambiguous) to render count of a matter; to pass it for audit: rationem alicuius rei reddere
    • (ambiguous) to demand an account, an audit of a matter: rationem alicuius rei reposcere aliquem or ab aliquo
    • (ambiguous) to demand an account, an audit of a matter: rationem ab aliquo reptere de aliqua re (Cluent. 37. 104)
    • (ambiguous) to make profit out of a thing: lucrum facere (opp. damnum facere) ex aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) want of corn; scarcity in the corn-market: inopia (opp. copia) rei frumentariae
    • (ambiguous) the constitution: forma rei publicae
    • (ambiguous) at the time of a most satisfactory government: optima re publica
    • (ambiguous) to have the management of the state: rei publicae praeesse
    • (ambiguous) to hold the reins of government: ad gubernacula (metaph. only in plur.) rei publicae sedere
    • (ambiguous) to hold the reins of government: clavum rei publicae tenere
    • (ambiguous) to hold the reins of government: gubernacula rei publicae tractare
    • (ambiguous) to hold the first position in the state: principem in re publica locum obtinere
    • (ambiguous) to take part in politics: in re publica or in rebus publicis versari
    • (ambiguous) to take no part in politics: rei publicae deesse (opp. adesse)
    • (ambiguous) to retire from public life: a re publica recedere
    • (ambiguous) to further the common weal: saluti rei publicae non deesse
    • (ambiguous) for political reasons: rei publicae causa (Sest. 47. 101)
    • (ambiguous) for the advantage of the state; in the interests of the state: e re publica (opp. contra rem p.)
    • (ambiguous) the welfare of the state: summa res publica (or summa rei publicae)
    • (ambiguous) the interests of the state: commoda publica or rei publicae rationes
    • (ambiguous) to further the public interests: rei publicae rationibus or simply rei publicae consulere
    • (ambiguous) to consider a thing from a political point of view: ad rei publicae rationes aliquid referre
    • (ambiguous) to devote one's every thought to the state's welfare: omnes curas in rei publicae salute defigere (Phil. 14. 5. 13)
    • (ambiguous) to devote oneself body and soul to the good of the state: totum et animo et corpore in salutem rei publicae se conferre
    • (ambiguous) to have the good of the state at heart: bene, optime sentire de re publica
    • (ambiguous) to have the good of the state at heart: omnia de re publica praeclara atque egregia sentire
    • (ambiguous) statesmen: viri rerum civilium, rei publicae gerendae periti or viri in re publica prudentes
    • (ambiguous) an experienced politician: homo in re publica exercitatus
    • (ambiguous) to possess great political insight: plus in re publica videre
    • (ambiguous) to foresee political events long before: longe prospicere futuros casus rei publicae (De Amic. 12. 40)
    • (ambiguous) a man's policy is aiming at, directed towards..: alicuius in re publica or capessendae rei publicae consilia eo spectant, ut...
    • (ambiguous) banished from public life: rei publicae muneribus orbatus
    • (ambiguous) to strive to gain popular favour by certain means: ventum popularem quendam (in aliqua re) quaerere
    • (ambiguous) to be politically annihilated: iacēre (vid. sect. VII. 1, note iacēre...)
    • (ambiguous) a political ally: consiliorum in re publica socius
    • (ambiguous) an independent spirit: a partibus rei publicae animus liber (Sall. Cat. 4. 2)
    • (ambiguous) to have the same political opinions: idem de re publica sentire
    • (ambiguous) to hold different views in politics: ab aliquo in re publica dissentire
    • (ambiguous) owing to political dissension: ex rei publicae dissensione
    • (ambiguous) revolution: conversio rei publicae (Div. 2. 2. 6)
    • (ambiguous) to betray the interests of the state: a re publica deficere
    • (ambiguous) to endanger the existence of the state: statum rei publicae convellere
    • (ambiguous) to establish oneself as despot, tyrant by some means: tyrannidem sibi parere aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to appeal to the plebeian tribunes against a praetor's decision: appellare tribunos plebis (in aliqua re a praetore) (Liv. 2. 55)
    • (ambiguous) to consult the senators on a matter: patres (senatum) consulere de aliqua re (Sall. Iug. 28)
    • (ambiguous) what is your opinion: quid de ea re fieri placet?
    • (ambiguous) to hold an inquiry into a matter: quaerere aliquid or de aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to examine a person, a matter: quaestionem habere de aliquo, de aliqua re or in aliquem
    • (ambiguous) to catch a person, find him out: deprehendere aliquem (in aliqua re)
    • (ambiguous) to cite a person to give evidence on a matter: aliquem testem alicuius rei (in aliquid) citare
    • (ambiguous) to charge some one with a capital offence: accusare aliquem rei capitalis (rerum capitalium)
    • (ambiguous) to decide on the conduct of the case: iudicare causam (de aliqua re)
    • (ambiguous) some one is to blame in a matter; it is some one's fault: culpa alicuius rei est in aliquo
    • (ambiguous) to bear the blame of a thing: culpam alicuius rei sustinere
    • (ambiguous) to punish some one: ulcisci aliquem (pro aliqua re)
    • (ambiguous) to be punished by some one (on account of a thing): poenas alicui pendere (alicuius rei)
    • (ambiguous) to suffer punishment: poenam (alicuius rei) ferre, perferre
    • (ambiguous) to be punished for a thing, expiate it: poenam luere (alicuius rei) (Sull. 27. 76)
    • (ambiguous) to atone for something by..: luere aliquid aliqua re (De Sen. 20)
    • (ambiguous) to look after the commissariat: rei frumentariae prospicere (B. G. 1. 23)
    • (ambiguous) to possess great experience in military matters: magnum usum in re militari habere (Sest. 5. 12)
    • (ambiguous) to have had no experience in war: rei militaris rudem esse
    • (ambiguous) not to be diffuse on such a well-known subject: ne in re nota et pervulgata multus sim
    • (ambiguous) this can be said of..., applies to..: hoc dici potest de aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) I have a few words to say on this: mihi quaedam dicenda sunt de hac re
    • (ambiguous) this shows, proves..: documento, indicio est (without demonstr. pron. but cui rei documento, indicio est)
  • res in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • res in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[3], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  • res in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin rēs (thing).

Noun[edit]

res f (plural reses)

  1. head of quadrupedal cattle or game
  2. (Latin America) bovine animal
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Plural of re.

Noun[edit]

res m pl

  1. plural of re

Further reading[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Verb[edit]

res

  1. imperative of resa

Anagrams[edit]


Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

cf Old Norse hreistr, Norwegian reist

Noun[edit]

res n or m

  1. guts; offal, scales of fish

Related terms[edit]


Wolof[edit]

Noun[edit]

res (definite form res wi)

  1. liver