flock

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Flock

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /flɒk/
  • (US) IPA(key): /flɑk/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɒk

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English flock (flock), from Old English flocc (flock, company, troop), from Proto-Germanic *flukkaz, *flakka- (crowd, troop). Cognate with Middle Low German vlocke (crowd, flock), Old Norse flokkr (crowd, troop, band, flock). Perhaps related to Old English folc (crowd, troop, band). More at folk.

Noun[edit]

flock (2) of sheep

flock (plural flocks)

  1. A large number of birds, especially those gathered together for the purpose of migration.
  2. A large number of animals, especially sheep or goats kept together.
  3. Those served by a particular pastor or shepherd.
    • (Can we date this quote by Tennyson and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      As half amazed, half frighted all his flock.
    • 1995, Green Key Books, God's Word to the Nations (John 10:16)[1]:
      I also have other sheep that are not from this pen. I must lead them. They, too, will respond to my voice. So they will be one flock with one shepherd.
  4. A large number of people.
    • Bible, 2 Macc. xiv. 14
      The heathen [] came to Nicanor by flocks.
    Synonym: congregation
  5. (Christianity) A religious congregation.
    Synonym: congregation
Synonyms[edit]

(large number of people):

Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Verb[edit]

flock (third-person singular simple present flocks, present participle flocking, simple past and past participle flocked)

  1. (intransitive) To congregate in or head towards a place in large numbers.
    People flocked to the cinema to see the new film.
    • (Can we date this quote by Dryden and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Friends daily flock.
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To flock to; to crowd.
    • 1609, Taylor
      Good fellows, trooping, flocked me so.
  3. To treat a pool with chemicals to remove suspended particles.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English flok (tuft of wool), from Old French floc (tuft of wool), from Late Latin floccus (tuft of wool), probably from Frankish *flokko (down, wool, flock), from Proto-Germanic *flukkōn-, *flukkan-, *fluksōn- (down, flock), from Proto-Indo-European *plewk- (hair, fibres, tuft). Cognate with Old High German flocko (down), Middle Dutch vlocke (flock), Norwegian dialectal flugsa (snowflake). Non-Germanic cognates include Albanian flokë (hair).

Noun[edit]

flock (countable and uncountable, plural flocks)

  1. Coarse tufts of wool or cotton used in bedding.
  2. A lock of wool or hair.
  3. Very fine sifted woollen refuse, especially that from shearing the nap of cloths, formerly used as a coating for wallpaper to give it a velvety or clothlike appearance; also, the dust of vegetable fibre used for a similar purpose.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

flock (third-person singular simple present flocks, present participle flocking, simple past and past participle flocked)

  1. (transitive) To coat a surface with dense fibers or particles.
Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Swedish flokker, flukker, from Old Norse flokkr, from Proto-Germanic *flukkaz. Cognate with Faroese flokkur, Icelandic flokkur, Norwegian flokk, and Danish flok.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

flock c

  1. flock; a group of people or animals
  2. murder of crows

Declension[edit]

Declension of flock 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative flock flocken flockar flockarna
Genitive flocks flockens flockars flockarnas

Related terms[edit]