pastor

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See also: Pastor, pastôr, and păstor

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English pastour, from Old French pastor (Modern French pasteur), from Latin pāstor.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pastor (plural pastors)

  1. (now rare) A shepherd; someone who tends to a flock of animals.
  2. Someone with spiritual authority over a group of people
  3. (Protestantism) A minister or priest in a church.
  4. (Roman Catholicism, US) The main priest serving a parish.
  5. A bird, the rosy starling.
    • 1944, Country Life (volume 95, page 820)
      Agricultural officers have put it on record that the pastor must on balance be considered beneficial on account of the vast quantities of locusts which it destroys.

Synonyms[edit]

  • (someone with spiritual authority): shepherd
  • (minister or priest in a church): elder
  • (main priest serving a parish): parish priest

Coordinate terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

pastor (third-person singular simple present pastors, present participle pastoring, simple past and past participle pastored)

  1. (Christianity, transitive, intransitive) To serve a congregation as pastor
    • 2009, January 21, “Shaila Dewan”, in Epic Campaign Divided Family, Then United It[1]:
      As they pastored churches in Georgia and Texas, they supported talented black politicians who were unable to win statewide office.

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Catalan pastor, from Latin pastōrem.

Noun[edit]

pastor m (plural pastors)

  1. shepherd, herder
  2. pastor, priest

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Cebuano[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish pastor. Doublet of pastores.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: pas‧tor
  • IPA(key): /pasˈtoɾ/, [pʌs̪ˈt̪uɾ̪]

Noun[edit]

pastór

  1. herder
  2. (Catholicism) parish priest; pastor
  3. (Protestantism) pastor

Related terms[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch pastoor, from Middle Dutch pastōor, from Latin pāstor, from pāscō (to feed, maintain, pasture, graze), from Proto-Indo-European *peh₂- (to protect).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /pastor/
  • Hyphenation: pas‧tor

Noun[edit]

pastor (first-person possessive pastorku, second-person possessive pastormu, third-person possessive pastornya)

  1. (Christianity, Roman Catholicism) parish priest

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From pāscō (to feed, maintain, pasture, graze), from Proto-Indo-European *peh₂- (to protect).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pāstor m (genitive pāstōris, feminine pāstrīx); third declension

  1. A person who tends sheep; shepherd.
    • 25 BC, Sextus Propertius, Elegiae; II, i, 43–4
      Navita de ventis, de tauris narrat arator,
      Enumerat miles vulnera, pastor oves.
      The sailor tells of winds, the ploughman of bulls,
      the soldier counts his wounds, the shepherd his sheep.
  2. A Christian who takes care of the spiritual needs of other Christians
    • 4th century, St Jerome, Vulgate, Ephesians 4:11
      et ipse dedit quosdam quidem apostolos quosdam autem prophetas alios vero evangelistas alios autem pastores et doctores (And he gave some apostles, and some prophets, and other some evangelists, and other some pastors and doctors:)

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative pāstor pāstōrēs
Genitive pāstōris pāstōrum
Dative pāstōrī pāstōribus
Accusative pāstōrem pāstōrēs
Ablative pāstōre pāstōribus
Vocative pāstor pāstōrēs

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • pastor”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • pastor”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • pastor in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • pastor”, in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin pastor.

Noun[edit]

pastor m (definite singular pastoren, indefinite plural pastorer, definite plural pastorene)

  1. (religion) a pastor

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin pastor.

Noun[edit]

pastor m (definite singular pastoren, indefinite plural pastorar, definite plural pastorane)

  1. (religion) a pastor

References[edit]


Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin pastor, pastōrem. Compare the inherited doublet pastre.

Noun[edit]

pastor m (oblique plural pastors, nominative singular pastre, nominative plural pastor)

  1. shepherd
  2. (Christianity) pastor

Descendants[edit]


Old Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin pastor, pastōrem.

Noun[edit]

pastor m (oblique plural pastors, nominative singular pastors, nominative plural pastor)

  1. shepherd

Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin pastor.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pastor m pers

  1. pastor (in Protestant churches)
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:ksiądz

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • pastor in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • pastor in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt
pastor

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese pastor, from Latin pastōrem.

Pronunciation[edit]

 

  • Hyphenation: pas‧tor

Noun[edit]

pastor m (plural pastores, feminine pastora, feminine plural pastoras)

  1. herdsman; herder (someone who tends livestock)
  2. (in particular) shepherd (someone who tends sheep)
  3. herding dog (any of several breeds of dog originally used to herd livestock)
    1. Ellipsis of pastor alemão.
  4. (figuratively, chiefly religion) shepherd (one who watches over or guides others)
  5. (Protestantism) the chief clergyman of a Protestant congregation: a pastor, minister or parson

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from German Pastor, from Latin pastor. Compare the inherited doublet păstor.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pastor m (plural pastori)

  1. (Protestantism) pastor, priest

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es
Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

Etymology[edit]

From Old Spanish pastor, from Latin pastōrem. Compare Italian pastore.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /pasˈtoɾ/ [pasˈt̪oɾ]
  • Rhymes: -oɾ
  • Hyphenation: pas‧tor

Noun[edit]

pastor m (plural pastores, feminine pastora, feminine plural pastoras)

  1. shepherd
  2. herder
  3. pastor, priest

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pastor c

  1. A pastor, priest.
  2. indefinite plural of pasta.

Declension[edit]

Declension of pastor 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative pastor pastorn pastorer pastorerna
Genitive pastors pastorns pastorers pastorernas

Descendants[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Tagalog[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish pastor. Doublet of pastol, an early borrowing.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: pas‧tor
  • IPA(key): /pasˈtoɾ/, [pɐsˈtoɾ]

Noun[edit]

pastór

  1. (Catholicism) parish priest; pastor
  2. (Protestantism) pastor

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Venetian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin pastor, pastōrem. Compare Italian pastore.

Noun[edit]

pastor m (plural pastori) or pastor m (plural pasturi)

  1. shepherd