rabbi

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See also: Rabbi

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin rabbi, and its source Koine Greek ῥαββί(rhabbí), from (post-biblical) Hebrew רַבִּי(rabbi, my master), from רַב(rav, master [of]) +‎ ־י(i, me).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rabbi ‎(plural rabbis)

  1. A Jewish scholar or teacher of halacha (Jewish law), capable of making halachic decisions.
  2. A Jew who is or is qualified to be the leader of a Jewish congregation.
  3. (law enforcement, slang) A senior officer who acts as a mentor.
    • 2006, The Wire, "Soft Eyes":
      Hoskins? He doesn't have a better rabbi in the department than that?
    • 2013, Brooklyn Nine-Nine, "Pilot":
      If I'm ever gonna make Captain, I need a good mentor. I need my rabbi.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: rab‧bi

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin rabbi, and its source Koine Greek ῥαββί(rhabbí), from (post-biblical) Hebrew רבי(rabbi, my master).

Noun[edit]

rabbi m ‎(plural rabbi's, diminutive rabbietje n)

  1. (Judaism) rabbi

Synonyms[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Noun[edit]

rabbi

  1. rabbi

Declension[edit]

Inflection of rabbi (Kotus type 5/risti, no gradation)
nominative rabbi rabbit
genitive rabbin rabbien
partitive rabbia rabbeja
illative rabbiin rabbeihin
singular plural
nominative rabbi rabbit
accusative nom. rabbi rabbit
gen. rabbin
genitive rabbin rabbien
partitive rabbia rabbeja
inessive rabbissa rabbeissa
elative rabbista rabbeista
illative rabbiin rabbeihin
adessive rabbilla rabbeilla
ablative rabbilta rabbeilta
allative rabbille rabbeille
essive rabbina rabbeina
translative rabbiksi rabbeiksi
instructive rabbein
abessive rabbitta rabbeitta
comitative rabbeineen

Synonyms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin rabbi, from Ancient Greek ῥαββί(rhabbí), from Hebrew רַבִּי(rabí).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈrɒbːi]
  • Hyphenation: rab‧bi

Noun[edit]

rabbi ‎(plural rabbik)

  1. (Judaism) rabbi

Declension[edit]

Inflection (stem in long/high vowel, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative rabbi rabbik
accusative rabbit rabbikat
dative rabbinak rabbiknak
instrumental rabbival rabbikkal
causal-final rabbiért rabbikért
translative rabbivá rabbikká
terminative rabbiig rabbikig
essive-formal rabbiként rabbikként
essive-modal
inessive rabbiban rabbikban
superessive rabbin rabbikon
adessive rabbinál rabbiknál
illative rabbiba rabbikba
sublative rabbira rabbikra
allative rabbihoz rabbikhoz
elative rabbiból rabbikból
delative rabbiról rabbikról
ablative rabbitól rabbiktól
Possessive forms of rabbi
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. rabbim rabbijaim
2nd person sing. rabbid rabbijaid
3rd person sing. rabbija rabbijai
1st person plural rabbink rabbijaink
2nd person plural rabbitok rabbijaitok
3rd person plural rabbijuk rabbijaik

Derived terms[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Noun[edit]

rabbi

  1. indefinite dative singular of rabb

Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • R. (abbreviation)

Etymology[edit]

From the Ancient Greek ῥαββί(rhabbí, literally O my Master), from the Hebrew rabbi”, “spiritual teacher(rabbī), from רב(raḇ, master) +‎ ־י(ī, of mine”, “my).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rabbī m ‎(indeclinable)

  1. (chiefly used as an honorific) Master, Doctor, and especially Rabbi
    Rabbī Mōsēs Maimōnidēs
    Rabbi Moses Maimonides

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Latin rabbi, from Ancient Greek ῥαββί(rhabbí), from Hebrew רַבִּי(rabbî).

Noun[edit]

rabbi m

  1. (Judaism) rabbi