doctor

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English doctor, doctour ‎(an expert, authority on a subject), from Anglo-Norman doctour, from Latin doctor ‎(teacher), from doceō ‎(I teach). Displaced native Middle English lerare ‎(doctor, teacher) (from Middle English leren ‎(to teach, instruct) from Old English lǣran, lēran ‎(to teach, instruct, guide), compare Old English lārēow ‎(teacher, master)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

doctor ‎(plural doctors)

  1. A physician; a member of the medical profession; one who is trained and licensed to heal the sick. The final examination and qualification may award a doctor degree in which case the post-nominal letters are D.O., DPM, M.D., DMD, DDS, DPT, DC, in the US or MBBS in the UK.
    If you still feel unwell tomorrow, see your doctor.
    • Shakespeare
      By medicine life may be prolonged, yet death / Will seize the doctor too.
  2. A person who has attained a doctorate, such as a Ph.D. or Th.D. or one of many other terminal degrees conferred by a college or university.
  3. A veterinarian; a medical practitioner who treats animals.
  4. A nickname for a person who has special knowledge or talents to manipulate or arrange transactions.
  5. (obsolete) A teacher; one skilled in a profession or a branch of knowledge; a learned man.
    • Francis Bacon
      one of the doctors of Italy, Nicholas Macciavel
  6. (dated) Any mechanical contrivance intended to remedy a difficulty or serve some purpose in an exigency.
    the doctor of a calico-printing machine, which is a knife to remove superfluous colouring matter
    the doctor, or auxiliary engine, also called "donkey engine"
    • 2010, Ramesh Bangia, Dictionary of Information Technology (page 172)
      The use of a disk doctor may be the only way of recovering valuable data following a disk crash.
  7. A fish, the friar skate.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Doctor is capitalized when used as a title:
    Doctor Smith

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also Types of academic doctor below

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

doctor ‎(third-person singular simple present doctors, present participle doctoring, simple past and past participle doctored)

  1. (transitive) To act as a medical doctor to.
    Her children doctored her back to health.
  2. (transitive) To make (someone) into an (academic) doctor; to confer a doctorate upon.
  3. (transitive) To physically alter (medically or surgically) a living being in order to change growth or behavior.
    They doctored their apple trees by vigorous pruning, and now the dwarfed trees are easier to pick.
    We may legally doctor a pet to reduce its libido.
  4. (transitive) To genetically alter an extant species.
    Mendel's discoveries showed how the evolution of a species may be doctored.
  5. (transitive) To alter or make obscure, as with the intention to deceive, especially a document.
    To doctor the signature of an instrument with intent to defraud is an example of forgery.

Translations[edit]

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Statistics[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Noun[edit]

doctor m ‎(plural doctores)

  1. doctor (person who has attained a doctorate)

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch doctor, from Latin doctor ‎(teacher, instructor).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈdɔktɔr/, /ˈdɔktər/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

doctor m ‎(plural doctors or doctoren, diminutive doctortje n)

  1. doctor (person who has attained a doctorate)

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

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Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From doceō ‎(teach) +‎ -tor.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

doctor m ‎(genitive doctōris); third declension

  1. teacher, instructor
    • c. 99 BCE – 55 BCE, Lucretius, De rerum natura 5.1310–1312
      [] et validos partim prae se misere leones
      cum doctoribus armatis saevisque magistris
      qui moderarier his possent vinclisque tenere,
      [] and some let out before them strong lions,
      with armed trainers and fierce masters
      to manage them and hold them in restraints,
  2. (Ecclesiastical Latin) catechist

Declension[edit]

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative doctor doctōrēs
genitive doctōris doctōrum
dative doctōrī doctōribus
accusative doctōrem doctōrēs
ablative doctōre doctōribus
vocative doctor doctōrēs

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin doctor (17th century), French docteur or German Doktor

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

doctor m (plural doctorifeminine equivalent doctoră)

  1. doctor

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Latin doctor.

Noun[edit]

doctor m ‎(plural doctores, feminine doctora)

  1. doctor (Ph.D.)
  2. physician

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]