vet

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See also: vét, vèt, vêt, vẹt, vet., and Vet.

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Clipping of veterinarian, or veterinary surgeon.

Noun[edit]

vet (plural vets)

  1. (colloquial) A veterinarian or veterinary surgeon.
    • 2011 December 14, Steven Morris, “Devon woman jailed for 168 days for killing kitten in microwave”, in Guardian[1]:
      Colin Cameron, a vet who examined the dead animal, said there was "no doubt the kitten would have suffered unnecessarily" before dying.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Clipping of veteran.

Noun[edit]

vet (plural vets)

  1. (colloquial, US) A veteran (a former soldier or other member of an armed forces).
Translations[edit]
Usage notes[edit]

Although veteran can be used in many contexts such as sports or business to describe someone with many years of experience, vet is usually used only for former military personnel.

Etymology 3[edit]

Possibly by analogy from Etymology 1, in the sense of "verifying the soundness [of an animal]"

Verb[edit]

vet (third-person singular simple present vets, present participle vetting, simple past and past participle vetted)

  1. To thoroughly check or investigate particularly with regard to providing formal approval.
    The FBI vets all nominees to the Federal bench.
References[edit]

OED2

Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

i vet

  1. his, her or their own
    Aleksandëri është me Albanin dhe qenin e vet.
    Aleksandër is with Alban and his (own) dog.

Declension[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

Used in contexts where i tij (his), i saj (her) or i tyre (their) would be ambiguous. In the example sentence above, if "e vet" were replaced with "e tij", it would more likely refer to Alban's dog. The use of "vet" removes this ambiguity.

See also[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin veto.

Noun[edit]

vet m (plural vets)

  1. veto

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch vet, from Old Dutch fētit, fet, from Proto-Germanic *faitidaz, originally a past participle.

Adjective[edit]

vet (comparative vetter, superlative vetst)

  1. fat
  2. greasy
  3. (informal) cool
    Wow, vet!

Inflection[edit]

Inflection of vet
uninflected vet
inflected vette
comparative vetter
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial vet vetter het vetst
het vetste
indefinite m./f. sing. vette vettere vetste
n. sing. vet vetter vetste
plural vette vettere vetste
definite vette vettere vetste
partitive vets vetters

Noun[edit]

vet n (plural vetten)

  1. fat
  2. grease

Derived terms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

vet

  1. (colloquial) very
    Hij is vet dik.
    He's very fat.

Anagrams[edit]


Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Of uncertain origin, perhaps from Proto-Finno-Ugric *wettä- (to throw, fling, toss). [1][2]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

vet

  1. (transitive) to throw, cast
  2. to sow
    ki mint vet, úgy arat – reap what one sows

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

(With verbal prefixes):

(Expressions):

References[edit]

  1. ^ Entry #1143 in Uralonet, online Uralic etymological database of the Research Institute for Linguistics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
  2. ^ Gábor Zaicz, Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete, Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, ISBN 963 7094 01 6

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch fētit, fet, from Proto-Germanic *faitidaz, originally a past participle.

Adjective[edit]

vet

  1. fat, large (of humans or animals)
  2. (rich in) fat
  3. fatty, greasy
  4. fertile, rich in nutrients (of land)

Inflection[edit]

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

Noun[edit]

vet n

  1. fat
  2. grease

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • vet (I)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • vet (II)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • vet (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929
  • vet (II)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

vet

  1. present tense of vite

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Verb[edit]

vet

  1. imperative of veta and vete

Swedish[edit]

Verb[edit]

vet

  1. Present tense of veta; know, knows
    Jag vet inte.
    I do not know.

Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse vit, from Proto-Germanic *witją. Cognate with Gutnish vit, Elfdalian wit and Blekingian vôjt.

Noun[edit]

vet n

  1. wits, reason
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse væta, from Proto-Germanic *wētijǭ.

Noun[edit]

vêt f

  1. milk or other liquid eaten with porridge
  2. humid weather

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Norse væta, from Proto-Germanic *wētijaną.

Verb[edit]

vêt (preterite vêtt, supine vett)

  1. to wet, water