cool

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See also: Cool and COOL

English

English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

  • enPR: ko͞ol, IPA(key): /kuːl/
  • Rhymes: -uːl
  • (file)

Etymology 1

From Middle English cool, from Old English cōl (cool, cold, tranquil, calm), from Proto-Germanic *kōlaz, *kōluz (cool), from Proto-Indo-European *gel- (cold). Cognate with Saterland Frisian köil (cool), West Frisian koel (cool), Dutch koel (cool), Limburgish kool (cool), German Low German köhl (cool), German kühl (cool). Related to cold.

Adjective

cool (comparative cooler, superlative coolest)

cool colors
  1. Having a slightly low temperature; mildly or pleasantly cold.
    Synonym: chilly
    Antonyms: lukewarm, tepid, warm
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 8, in The Celebrity:
      The day was cool and snappy for August, and the Rise all green with a lavish nature. Now we plunged into a deep shade with the boughs lacing each other overhead, and crossed dainty, rustic bridges over the cold trout-streams, the boards giving back the clatter of our horses' feet: [] .
  2. Allowing or suggesting heat relief.
    Linen has made cool and breathable clothing for millennia.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 2, in The China Governess[1]:
      Now that she had rested and had fed from the luncheon tray Mrs. Broome had just removed, she had reverted to her normal gaiety.  She looked cool in a grey tailored cotton dress with a terracotta scarf and shoes and her hair a black silk helmet.
  3. Of a color, in the range of violet to green.
    Antonym: warm
    If you have a reddish complexion, you should mainly wear cool colors.
  4. Of a person, not showing emotion; calm and in control of oneself.
    Synonyms: distant, phlegmatic, standoffish, unemotional
    Antonym: passionate
  5. Unenthusiastic, lukewarm, skeptical.
    Antonym: warm
    His proposals had a cool reception.
  6. Calmly audacious.
    In control as always, he came up with a cool plan.
  7. Applied facetiously to a sum of money, commonly as if to give emphasis to the largeness of the amount.
    • (Can we date this quote by Henry Fielding and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      He had lost a cool hundred.
    • 1860 December – 1861 August, Charles Dickens, chapter 18, in Great Expectations [...] In Three Volumes, volume III, London: Chapman and Hall, [], published October 1861, OCLC 3359935, page 303:
      , or Chapter 57 of single-volume chapter numbering
      leaving a cool four thousand to Mr. Matthew Pocket
    • 1900, Dora Sigerson Shorter, Transmigration
      You remember Bulger, don't you? You lost a cool hundred to him one night here over the cards, eh?
    • 1944 November 28, Irving Brecher and Fred F. Finklehoffe, Meet Me in St. Louis, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer:
      My father was talking to the World's Fair Commission yesterday, and they estimate it's going to cost a cool fifty million.
  8. (informal) Of a person, knowing what to do and how to behave; considered popular by others.
    Antonyms: awkward, uncool
    • 2017 December 27, “The Guardian view on Prince Harry: the monarchy’s best insurance policy”, in the Guardian[3]:
      He managed to conduct interviews with the least cool global figure – his father, Prince Charles – and the most cool, Barack Obama, in a way that allowed them both to look as good as they could.
  9. (informal) In fashion, part of or fitting the in crowd; originally hipster slang.
    Synonyms: à la mode, fashionable, in fashion, modish, stylish, happening, hip, in, trendy
    Antonyms: démodé, old hat, out, out of fashion
    • 2008, Lou Schuler, "Foreward", in Nate Green, Built for Show, page xii
      The fact that I was middle-aged, bald, married, and raising girls instead of chasing them didn't really bother me. Muscles are cool at any age.
  10. (informal) Of an action, all right; acceptable; that does not present a problem.
    Synonyms: acceptable, all right, OK
    Antonyms: not cricket (UK), not on, unacceptable
    Is it cool if I sleep here tonight?
  11. (informal) Of a person, not upset by circumstances that might ordinarily be upsetting.
    I'm completely cool with my girlfriend leaving me.
    Synonyms: easy, fine, not bothered, not fussed
    Antonyms: bothered, upset
  12. Quietly impudent, defiant, or selfish; deliberately presuming: said of persons and acts.
Derived terms
Terms derived from cool (adjective)
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Noun

cool (uncountable)

  1. A moderate or refreshing state of cold; moderate temperature of the air between hot and cold; coolness.
    in the cool of the morning
  2. A calm temperament.
    Synonyms: calmness, composure
  3. The property of being cool, popular or in fashion.
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English colen, from Old English cōlian (to cool, grow cold, be cold), from Proto-Germanic *kōlēną (to become cold), from Proto-Indo-European *gel- (to freeze). Cognate with Dutch koelen (to cool), German kühlen (to cool), Swedish kyla (to cool, refrigerate). Also partially from Middle English kelen, from Old English cēlan (to cool, be cold, become cold), from Proto-Germanic *kōlijaną (to cool), altered to resemble the adjective cool. See keel.

Verb

cool (third-person singular simple present cools, present participle cooling, simple past and past participle cooled)

  1. (intransitive, literally) To lose heat, to get colder.
    I like to let my tea cool before drinking it so I don't burn my tongue.
  2. (transitive) To make cooler, less warm.
    • Bible, Luke xvi. 24:
      Send Lazarus, that he may dip the tip of his finger in water, and cool my tongue.
  3. (figuratively, intransitive) To become less intense, e.g. less amicable or passionate.
    Relations cooled between the USA and the USSR after 1980.
  4. (transitive) To make less intense, e.g. less amicable or passionate.
  5. (transitive) To kill.
    • 1965, "Sex Jungle" (narrated in Perversion for Profit)
      Maybe he would die. That would mean I had murdered him. I smiled, trying the idea on for size. One of the things that always had cheesed me a little was that I had no kills to my credit. I'd been in plenty of rumbles, but somehow, I'd never cooled anyone. Well maybe now I had my first one. I couldn't feel very proud of skulling an old man, but at least I could say that I'd scored. That was a big kick.
Derived terms
Translations

References

  • cool in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911.
  • cool at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams


Dutch

Etymology

From English cool.

Pronunciation

Adjective

cool (comparative cooler, superlative coolst)

  1. cool, fashionable

Inflection

Inflection of cool
uninflected cool
inflected coole
comparative cooler
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial cool cooler het coolst
het coolste
indefinite m./f. sing. coole coolere coolste
n. sing. cool cooler coolste
plural coole coolere coolste
definite coole coolere coolste
partitive cools coolers

French

Etymology

From English cool.

Pronunciation

Adjective

cool (invariable)

  1. cool (only its informal senses, mainly fashionable)
    Les jeunes sont cool.
    Young people are cool.
    Les jeunes boivent de l'alcool pour être cool.
    Young people drink alcohol to be cool.

Interjection

cool

  1. cool! great!

Anagrams


German

Etymology

From English cool, from Proto-Germanic *kōlaz. Doublet of kühl.

Pronunciation

Adjective

cool (comparative cooler, superlative am coolsten)

  1. (colloquial) cool (in its informal senses)
    Synonyms: brilliant, genial, geil
    Die Musik war echt cool.
    The music was very cool.
  2. (colloquial) cool, calm, easy-going
    Synonyms: lässig, ruhig
    Als Trainer muss mann ziemlich cool sein.
    As a trainer you have to be quite easy-going.

Declension

Further reading

  • cool in Duden online

Polish

Etymology

From English cool.

Pronunciation

Adjective

cool

  1. (colloquial) cool (in its informal senses)
    Synonyms: świetny, wspaniały, znakomity

Declension

Indeclinable.

Further reading

  • cool in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • cool in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English cool

Pronunciation

Adjective

cool (plural cools or cool)

  1. cool (in its informal sense)

Swedish

Etymology

Borrowed from English cool.

Pronunciation

Adjective

cool (comparative coolare, superlative coolast)

  1. cool! great!

Declension

Inflection of cool
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular cool coolare coolast
Neuter singular coolt coolare coolast
Plural coola coolare coolast
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 coole coolare coolaste
All coola coolare coolaste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.