ordo

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Latin ōrdō.

Noun[edit]

ordo ‎(plural ordines or ordos)

  1. (music) A musical phrase constructed from one or more statements of one modal pattern and ending in a rest.
  2. (Roman Catholicism) A calendar which prescribes the Mass and office which is to be celebrated each day.

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Noun[edit]

ordo ‎(accusative singular ordon, plural ordoj, accusative plural ordojn)

  1. order

Derived terms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ordo m ‎(feminine singular orda, masculine plural ordi, feminine plural orde)

  1. ugly, horrible, deformed

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *ord-n- ‎(row, order). Maybe from Proto-Indo-European *h₂or-d-, from *h₂er-, hence artus.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ōrdō m ‎(genitive ōrdinis); third declension

  1. a methodical series, arrangement, or order; regular line, row, or series
  2. a class, station, condition, rank
  3. a group (of people) of the same class, caste, station, or rank ("senatorii ordinis")
  4. (military) A rank or line of soldiers; band, troop, company
  5. (military) command, captaincy, generalship

Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative ōrdō ōrdinēs
genitive ōrdinis ōrdinum
dative ōrdinī ōrdinibus
accusative ōrdinem ōrdinēs
ablative ōrdine ōrdinibus
vocative ōrdō ōrdinēs

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • ordo in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ordo in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ORDO in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • ordo in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • chronology: temporum ratio, descriptio, ordo
    • to narrate events in the order of their occurrence: res temporum ordine servato narrare
    • to detail the whole history of an affair: ordine narrare, quomodo res gesta sit
    • the order of words: ordo verborum (Or. 63. 214)
    • the alphabet: litterarum ordo
    • to arrange in alphabetical order: ad litteram or litterarum ordine digerere
    • the senatorial order: ordo senatorius (amplissimus)
    • the equestrian order; the knights: ordo equester (splendidissimus)
    • people of every rank and age: homines omnium ordinum et aetatum
    • with close ranks; with ranks in disorder: confertis, solutis ordinibus
    • in open order: raris ordinibus
    • to fight in open order: laxatis (opp. confertis) ordinibus pugnare
    • (ambiguous) to systematise, classify a thing: in ordinem redigere aliquid
    • (ambiguous) to observe the chronological order of events: temporum ordinem servare
    • (ambiguous) to keep the ranks: ordines servare (B. G. 4. 26)
    • (ambiguous) to break the ranks: ordines turbare, perrumpere
  • ordo in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ordo in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  • ordo in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill