rank

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See also: Rank, ránk, and ränk

Translingual[edit]

Symbol[edit]

rank

  1. (mathematics) The symbol for rank.

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɹæŋk/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æŋk

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English rank (strong, proud), from Old English ranc (proud, haughty, arrogant, insolent, forward, overbearing, showy, ostentatious, splendid, bold, valiant, noble, brave, strong, full-grown, mature), from Proto-West Germanic *rank, from Proto-Germanic *rankaz (straight), from Proto-Indo-European *h₃reǵ- (straight, direct). Cognate with Dutch rank (slender, slim), Low German rank (slender, projecting, lank), Danish rank (straight, erect, slender), Swedish rank (slender, shaky, wonky), Icelandic rakkur (straight, slender, bold, valiant).

Adjective[edit]

rank (comparative ranker or more rank, superlative rankest or most rank)

  1. Strong of its kind or in character; unmitigated; virulent; thorough; utter (used of negative things).
    rank treason
    rank nonsense
  2. Strong in growth; growing with vigour or rapidity, hence, coarse or gross.
    rank grass
    rank weeds
  3. Suffering from overgrowth or hypertrophy; plethoric.
  4. Causing strong growth; producing luxuriantly; rich and fertile.
    rank land
    • 1707, J[ohn] Mortimer, The Whole Art of Husbandry; or, The Way of Managing and Improving of Land. [], 2nd edition, London: [] J[ohn] H[umphreys] for H[enry] Mortlock [], and J[onathan] Robinson [], published 1708, OCLC 13320837:
      fow Sprat or Fullum Barley, which is the best for rank Land, because it doth not run ſo much to Straw
  5. Strong to the senses; offensive; noisome.
  6. Having a very strong and bad taste or odor.
    Synonyms: stinky, smelly, (UK) pongy
    Your gym clothes are rank, bro – when'd you last wash 'em?
  7. Complete, used as an intensifier (usually negative, referring to incompetence).
    Synonyms: complete, utter
    I am a rank amateur as a wordsmith.
    • 2011 March 1, Phil McNulty, “Chelsea 2-1 Man Utd”, in BBC:
      Chelsea remain rank outsiders to retain their crown and they still lie 12 points adrift of United, but Ancelotti will regard this as a performance that supports his insistence that they can still have a say when the major prizes are handed out this season.
  8. (informal) Gross, disgusting.
  9. (obsolete) Strong; powerful; capable of acting or being used with great effect; energetic; vigorous; headstrong.
  10. (obsolete) lustful; lascivious
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Adverb[edit]

rank (comparative more rank, superlative most rank)

  1. (obsolete) Quickly, eagerly, impetuously.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English rank (line, row), from Old French ranc, rang, reng (line, row, rank) (Modern French rang), from Frankish *hring (ring), from Proto-Germanic *hringaz (something bent or curved).

Akin to Old High German (h)ring, Old Frisian hring, Old English hring, hrincg (ring) (Modern English ring), Old Norse hringr (ring, circle, queue, sword; ship). More at ring.

Noun[edit]

rank (countable and uncountable, plural ranks)

  1. A row of people or things organized in a grid pattern, often soldiers.
    Antonym: file
    The front rank kneeled to reload while the second rank fired over their heads.
    • 1684, Richard Elton, The compleat body of the Art Military [] [2], 2nd edition, page 196:
      The Musketeers being on both flancks, firſt firing let the Ranck ſtand, and fire every Ranck, paſſing through before his leader []
    • 1907, Harold Bindloss, chapter 7, in The Dust of Conflict[3]:
      Then there was no more cover, for they straggled out, not in ranks but clusters, from among orange trees and tall, flowering shrubs [] .
  2. (chess) One of the eight horizontal lines of squares on a chessboard (i.e., those identified by a number).
    Antonym: file
  3. (music) In a pipe organ, a set of pipes of a certain quality for which each pipe corresponds to one key or pedal.
  4. One's position in a list sorted by a shared property such as physical location, population, or quality.
    Based on your test scores, you have a rank of 23.
    {{ux|en|The fancy hotel was of the first rank.
  5. The level of one's position in a class-based society.
  6. (typically in the plural) A category of people, such as those who share an occupation or belong to an organisation.
    a membership drawn from the ranks of wealthy European businessmen
    • 2017 September 23, “From north Wales to Norfolk, distraught beekeepers ask: who’s stealing our hives?”, in The Observer[4]:
      Earlier this month police in Norfolk were called after five hives thought to contain around 60,000 bees and £600 worth of honey were taken. [...] Suspicions among beekeepers that the culprits come from their own ranks were underlined by the fact that a bee smoker was left at the scene by someone who presumably knew that it could be used to calm the insects before taking them.
  7. A hierarchical level in an organization such as the military.
    Private First Class (PFC) is the second-lowest rank in the Marines.
    He rose up through the ranks of the company, from mailroom clerk to CEO.
  8. (taxonomy) A level in a scientific taxonomy system.
    Phylum is the taxonomic rank below kingdom and above class.
  9. (mathematics) The dimensionality of an array (computing) or tensor.
  10. (linear algebra) The maximal number of linearly independent columns (or rows) of a matrix.
  11. (algebra) The maximum quantity of D-linearly independent elements of a module (over an integral domain D).
  12. (mathematics) The size of any basis of a given matroid.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

rank (third-person singular simple present ranks, present participle ranking, simple past and past participle ranked)

  1. To place abreast, or in a line.
  2. To have a ranking.
    Their defense ranked third in the league.
  3. To assign a suitable place in a class or order; to classify.
    • 1725, Isaac Watts, Logick, or The Right Use of Reason in the Enquiry After Truth With a Variety of Rules to Guard:
      Ranking all things under general and special heads.
    • 1726, William Broome, The Odyssey (by Homer)
      Poets were ranked in the class of philosophers.
    • 1667, Richard Allestree, The Causes of the Decay of Christian Piety
      Heresy [is] ranked with idolatry, witchcraft, hatred, murders, and other sins of the flesh.
  4. (US) To take rank of; to outrank.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  • rank at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • rank in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch ranc, from Proto-Germanic *rankaz.[1]

Adjective[edit]

rank (comparative ranker, superlative rankst)

  1. slender, svelte

Derived terms[edit]

Inflection[edit]
Inflection of rank
uninflected rank
inflected ranke
comparative ranker
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial rank ranker het rankst
het rankste
indefinite m./f. sing. ranke rankere rankste
n. sing. rank ranker rankste
plural ranke rankere rankste
definite ranke rankere rankste
partitive ranks rankers

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Dutch ranc, ranke, from Old Dutch *rank, from Frankish hranca.

Noun[edit]

rank f (plural ranken, diminutive rankje n)

  1. tendril, a thin winding stem
  2. name of various vines
  3. an object or ornamental pattern resembling a stem

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ J. de Vries & F. de Tollenaere, "Etymologisch Woordenboek", Uitgeverij Het Spectrum, Utrecht, 1986 (14de druk)

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German rank, ranc, from Proto-Germanic *rankaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

rank (comparative ranker, superlative am ranksten)

  1. (poetic, dated, except in the phrase rank und schlank) lithe, lissome

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

rank

  1. singular imperative of ranken

Further reading[edit]

  • rank” in Duden online