fertile

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See also: Fertile

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Middle English, from Middle French fertile, from Old French fertile, from Latin fertilis (fruitful, fertile), from ferō (I bear, carry).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fertile (comparative more fertile, superlative most fertile)

  1. Of land, etc.: capable of growing abundant crops; productive.
  2. (figuratively) Of one's imagination, etc.: active, productive, prolific.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:productive
  3. (biology)
    1. Capable of reproducing; fecund, fruitful.
      Synonym: (archaic) childing
      Antonyms: barren, infertile, sterile
      Most women at the age of fifty are not fertile.
    2. Capable of developing past the egg stage.
  4. (physics) Not itself fissile, but able to be converted into a fissile material by irradiation in a reactor.
    There are two basic fertile materials: uranium-238 and thorium-232.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin fertilem.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fertile (plural fertiles)

  1. fertile

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin fertilis, fertilem.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fertile (plural fertili)

  1. fertile
    Antonym: infertile

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • fertile in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Latin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fertile

  1. nominative/accusative/vocative neuter singular of fertilis