stage

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See also: Stage

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English stage, from Old French estage (dwelling, residence; position, situation, condition), from Old French ester (to be standing, be located). Cognate with Old English stæþþan (to make staid, stay), Old Norse steðja (to place, provide, confirm, allow), Old English stæde, stede (state, status, standing, place, station, site). More at stead.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /steɪd͡ʒ/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪdʒ

Noun[edit]

stage (plural stages)

  1. A phase.
    He is in the recovery stage of his illness.
    Completion of an identifiable stage of maintenance such as removing an aircraft engine for repair or storage.
    • 1849–1861, Thomas Babington Macaulay, chapter 1, in The History of England from the Accession of James the Second, volumes (please specify |volume=I to V), London: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, →OCLC:
      Such a polity is suited only to a particular stage in the progress of society.
    • 1986, Daniel Woodrell, Under the Bright Lights, page 66:
      "They're bikini briefs", Nicole said. "That just means sexy underwear."
      "I though naked was sexy."
      "Well, it is. But sexy comes in stages".
    • 2013 June 28, Joris Luyendijk, “Our banks are out of control”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 3, page 21:
      Seeing the British establishment struggle with the financial sector is like watching an alcoholic […].  Until 2008 there was denial over what finance had become. […]  But the scandals kept coming, and so we entered stage three – what therapists call "bargaining". A broad section of the political class now recognises the need for change but remains unable to see the necessity of a fundamental overhaul. Instead it offers fixes and patches.
  2. (by extension) One of the portions of a device (such as a rocket or thermonuclear weapon) which are used or activated in a particular order, one after another.
    The first stage of the launcher burned out and separated after successfully boosting the payload onto a suborbital trajectory, but the engine of the upper stage failed to ignite to place the satellite into orbit.
  3. (theater) A platform; a surface, generally elevated, upon which show performances or other public events are given.
    The band returned to the stage to play an encore.
    • 1709, [Alexander Pope], An Essay on Criticism, London: [] W. Lewis [], published 1711, →OCLC:
      Knights, squires, and steeds must enter on the stage.
    • 1829, Charles Sprague, Curiosity:
      Lo! Where the stage, the poor, degraded stage, / Holds its warped mirror to a gaping age.
    • 1891, Oscar Wilde, Intentions:
      The theater is not merely the meeting place of all the arts, it is also the return of art to life.
  4. A floor or storey of a house.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wyclif to this entry?)
  5. A floor elevated for the convenience of mechanical work, etc.; scaffolding; staging.
  6. A platform, often floating, serving as a kind of wharf.
  7. A stagecoach, an enclosed horsedrawn carriage used to carry passengers.
    The stage pulled into town carrying the payroll for the mill and three ladies.
  8. (dated) A place of rest on a regularly travelled road; a station; a place appointed for a relay of horses.
  9. (dated) A degree of advancement in a journey; one of several portions into which a road or course is marked off; the distance between two places of rest on a road.
    a stage of ten miles
    • 1807, Francis Jeffrey, “Clarkson on Quakerism”, in The Edinburgh Review April 1807:
      A stage [] signifies a certain distance on a road.
    • 1858, Samuel Smiles, Robert Stephenson, The Life of George Stephenson: Railway Engineer[1], page 356:
      He travelled by gig, with his wife, his favourite horse performing the journey by easy stages.
    • 1910, Emerson Hough, chapter 3, in The Purchase Price:
      The Mount Vernon, favoured by a good stage of water, soon cleared the narrow Monongahela channel, passed the confluence, and headed down under full steam, […].
    • 1962 December, “Dr. Beeching previews the plan for British Railways”, in Modern Railways, page 377:
      At present, however, in spite of vigorous efforts to increase through train working, the stage-by-stage movement of individual wagons remains the normal method of freight movement.
  10. (electronics) The number of an electronic circuit’s block, such as a filter, an amplifier, etc.
    a 3-stage cascade of a 2nd-order bandpass Butterworth filter
  11. The place on a microscope where the slide is located for viewing.
    He placed the slide on the stage.
  12. (video games) A level; one of the sequential areas making up the game.
    Synonym: level
    How do you get past the flying creatures in the third stage?
  13. A place where anything is publicly exhibited, or a remarkable affair occurs; the scene.
    • c. 1603–1606, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of King Lear”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, →OCLC, [Act IV, scene vi]:
      When we are born, we cry that we are come / To this stage of fools.
    • c. 1630, John Milton, “The Passion”, in Poems of Mr. John Milton, [], London: [] Ruth Raworth for Humphrey Mosely, [], published 1646, →OCLC, page 16:
      Ere while of Muſick, and Ethereal mirth,
      Wherewith the ſtage of Ayr and Earth did ring,
    • 2011 September 2, Phil McNulty, “Bulgaria 0-3 England”, in BBC:
      Rooney's United team-mate Chris Smalling was given his debut at right-back and was able to adjust to the international stage in relatively relaxed fashion as Bulgaria barely posed a threat of any consequence.
    • 2015, Gary Andres, Paul Hernnson, Lobbying Reconsidered: Politics Under the Influence, page 149:
      Paid media is the admission ticket to enter the big-time Washington stage.
  14. (geology) The succession of rock strata laid down in a single age on the geologic time scale.
  15. (Canada, Quebec) An internship.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Terms derived from stage (noun)
Descendants[edit]
  • Japanese: ステージ (sutēji)
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

stage (third-person singular simple present stages, present participle staging, simple past and past participle staged)

  1. (transitive) To produce on a stage, to perform a play.
    The local theater group will stage "Pride and Prejudice".
  2. To demonstrate in a deceptive manner.
    The salesman's demonstration of the new cleanser was staged to make it appear highly effective.
  3. (transitive) To orchestrate; to carry out.
    The workers staged a strike.
    A protest will be staged in the public square on Monday.
  4. (transitive) To place in position to prepare for use.
    We staged the cars to be ready for the start, then waited for the starter to drop the flag.
    to stage data to be written at a later time
  5. (transitive, medicine) To determine what stage (a disease, etc.) has progressed to
    • 2010, Howard M. Fillit, Kenneth Rockwood, Kenneth Woodhouse, Brocklehurst's Textbook of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology, page 940:
      One method of documenting a wound is as follows: (1) stage the ulcer, time present, setting where occurred; (2) describe the location anatomically; (3) measure ulcer in centimeters (length × width × base); []
  6. (astronautics) To jettison a spent stage of a multistage rocket or other launch vehicle and light the engine(s) of the stage above it.
    In Kerbal Space Program, you stage away used-up parts of your rocket by hitting the spacebar.
Synonyms[edit]
  • (demonstrate in a deceptive manner): fake
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Borrowed from French stage (internship).

Pronunciation[edit]

This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA or enPR then please add some!

Noun[edit]

stage (plural stages)

  1. (cooking) An unpaid internship in a restaurant where a cook or chef is exposed to new culinary techniques.
    • 2023 June 23, Tejal Rao, “‘The Bear’ Finds Optimism in the Dysfunctional World of Hospitality”, in The New York Times[2]:
      It doesn’t matter that recent reporting on the stage economy of Copenhagen [] has revealed a pattern of abuse and dangerous working conditions for unpaid interns. In “The Bear,” the stage is a dream: Marcus’s tasks are simply to learn from a skilled but kind and patient mentor, to get out and about and feel inspired, and to come up with some new dishes of his own.
Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

stage (third-person singular simple present stages, present participle staging, simple past and past participle staged)

  1. (intransitive, cooking) To work as an unpaid intern in a restaurant.

Anagrams[edit]

Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French stage.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: sta‧ge

Noun[edit]

stage m (plural stages, diminutive stagetje n)

  1. probation, induction
  2. apprenticeship
  3. internship

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Learned borrowing from Medieval Latin stagium, itself from Old French estage: ester +‎ -age (whence modern French étage).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stage m (plural stages)

  1. internship, job that a trainee is doing in a workplace until a fixed date
    rapport de stageinternship report, training period report
    • 1844, Honoré de Balzac, Modeste Mignon:
      Ce jeune homme avait déjà fait un stage de ce genre auprès d’un des ministres tombés en 1827;
      This young man has already done an internship of this kind with one of the ministers who had fallen in 1827;
  2. probation, induction

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French stage.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stage m (invariable)

  1. internship
    Synonym: tirocinio

Usage notes[edit]

  • The noun is often, but incorrectly, pronounced IPA(key): /ˈstejd͡ʒ/ or IPA(key): /ˈstɛjd͡ʒ/ via an erroneous connection to English stage. Sometimes the word is also given the meaning of English "stage" (as in a platform where a performance happens).

Anagrams[edit]

Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French estage, from ester (to be standing, be located).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stage (plural stages or stage)

  1. A tier of a structure; a floor or storey:
    1. The topmost story of a building; a rooftop.
    2. A deck (surface of a ship)
    3. A floor of a vehicle or on a mount.
  2. A raised floor; a platform or podium.
    1. A ledge or shelf (projecting storage platform)
    2. A stage; a platform facing the audience.
    3. A box seat; a premium seat for an audience member.
  3. A duration or period; an amount of time.
  4. A stage or phase; a sequential part.
  5. A tier or grade; a place in a hierarchy.
  6. A locale or place; a specified point in space.
  7. Heaven (home of (the Christian) God)
  8. (rare) The cross-beam of a window.
  9. (rare) A seat or chair.
  10. (rare) A state of being.

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]