stage

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See also: Stage

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia


Etymology[edit]

From Middle English stage, from Old French estage (dwelling, residence; position, situation, condition), from Old French ester (to be standing, be located). Cognate with Old English stæþþan (to make staid, stay), Old Norse steðja (to place, provide, confirm, allow), Old English stæde, stede (state, status, standing, place, station, site). More at stead.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /steɪd͡ʒ/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪdʒ

Noun[edit]

stage (plural stages)

  1. A phase.
    He is in the recovery stage of his illness.
    Completion of an identifiable stage of maintenance such as removing an aircraft engine for repair or storage.
  2. (theater) A platform; a surface, generally elevated, upon which show performances or other public events are given.
    The band returned to the stage to play an encore.
  3. A floor or storey of a house.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wyclif to this entry?)
  4. A floor elevated for the convenience of mechanical work, etc.; scaffolding; staging.
  5. A platform, often floating, serving as a kind of wharf.
  6. A stagecoach, an enclosed horsedrawn carriage used to carry passengers.
    The stage pulled into town carrying the payroll for the mill and three ladies.
  7. (dated) A place of rest on a regularly travelled road; a station; a place appointed for a relay of horses.
  8. (dated) A degree of advancement in a journey; one of several portions into which a road or course is marked off; the distance between two places of rest on a road.
    a stage of ten miles
  9. (electronics) The number of an electronic circuit’s block, such as a filter, an amplifier, etc.
    a 3-stage cascade of a 2nd-order bandpass Butterworth filter
  10. The place on a microscope where the slide is located for viewing.
    He placed the slide on the stage.
  11. (video games) A level; one of the sequential areas making up the game.
    How do you get past the flying creatures in the third stage?
    Synonym: level
  12. A place where anything is publicly exhibited, or a remarkable affair occurs; the scene.
  13. (geology) The succession of rock strata laid down in a single age on the geologic time scale.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Terms derived from stage (noun)

Descendants[edit]

  • Japanese: ステージ (sutēji)

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

stage (third-person singular simple present stages, present participle staging, simple past and past participle staged)

  1. (transitive) To produce on a stage, to perform a play.
    The local theater group will stage "Pride and Prejudice".
  2. To demonstrate in a deceptive manner.
    The salesman's demonstration of the new cleanser was staged to make it appear highly effective.
  3. (transitive) To orchestrate; to carry out.
    The workers staged a strike.
    A protest will be staged in the public square on Monday.
  4. (transitive) To place in position to prepare for use.
    We staged the cars to be ready for the start, then waited for the starter to drop the flag.
    to stage data to be written at a later time
  5. (transitive, medicine) To determine what stage (a disease, etc.) has progressed to
    • 2010, Howard M. Fillit, ‎Kenneth Rockwood, ‎Kenneth Woodhouse, Brocklehurst's Textbook of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology (page 940)
      One method of documenting a wound is as follows: (1) stage the ulcer, time present, setting where occurred; (2) describe the location anatomically; (3) measure ulcer in centimeters (length × width × base); []

Synonyms[edit]

  • (demonstrate in a deceptive manner): fake

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French stage

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: sta‧ge

Noun[edit]

stage m (plural stages, diminutive stagetje n)

  1. probation, induction
  2. apprenticeship
  3. internship

Related terms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Medieval Latin stagium, itself from Old French estage: ester +‎ -age (whence modern French étage). Cognates and borrowings are common in other European languages, including Italian stage, Czech stáž, Dutch stage, Portuguese estágio and Serbo-Croatian staž.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stage m (plural stages)

  1. internship, job that a trainee is doing in a workplace until a fixed date
    • 1844, Honoré de Balzac, Modeste Mignon:
      Ce jeune homme avait déjà fait un stage de ce genre auprès d’un des ministres tombés en 1827;
      This young man has already done an internship of this kind with one of the ministers who had fallen in 1827;
  2. probation, induction

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French stage.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stage m (invariable)

  1. internship

Synonyms[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French estage, from ester (to be standing, be located).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stage (plural stages or stage)

  1. A tier of a structure; a floor or storey:
    1. The topmost story of a building; a rooftop.
    2. A deck (surface of a ship)
    3. A floor of a vehicle or on a mount.
  2. A raised floor; a platform or podium.
    1. A ledge or shelf (projecting storage platform)
    2. A stage; a platform facing the audience.
    3. A box seat; a premium seat for an audience member.
  3. A duration or period; an amount of time.
  4. A stage or phase; a sequential part.
  5. A tier or grade; a place in a hierarchy.
  6. A locale or place; a specified point in space.
  7. Heaven (home of (the Christian) God)
  8. (rare) The cross-beam of a window.
  9. (rare) A seat or chair.
  10. (rare) A state of being.

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]