ester

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See also: Ester, éster, and Estèr

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Contraction or abstraction of German Essigäther(ethyl acetate), from Essig(vinegar) (from Latin acetum) and Äther(ether). See ether for more.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ester ‎(plural esters)

  1. (organic chemistry) A compound most often formed by the condensation of an alcohol and an acid, with elimination of water, which contains the functional group carbon-oxygen double bond joined via carbon to another oxygen atom.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Cornish[edit]

Noun[edit]

ester f ‎(singulative estren)

  1. oysters

Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

ester c (singular definite esteren, plural indefinite estere)

  1. Estonian
Declension[edit]
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From German Ester

Noun[edit]

ester c (singular definite esteren, plural indefinite estere)

  1. ester
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from German Ester.

Noun[edit]

ester m ‎(plural esters, diminutive estertje n)

  1. (organic chemistry) ester

Estonian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Noun[edit]

ester ‎(genitive estri, partitive estrit)

  1. (organic chemistry) ester

Declension[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French ester, from Vulgar Latin *estō, from Classical Latin stō (cf. also the juridical Medieval Latin senses), from Proto-Indo-European *steh₂-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

ester

  1. (law, rare) to appear
  2. (archaic) to be
Conjugation[edit]

This verb does not conjugate. It appears only in the infinitive.

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From German Essig-Äther(acetic acid ethyl ester).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ester m ‎(plural esters)

  1. (organic chemistry) ester

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Ladin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin exterus, from exter.

Adjective[edit]

ester m (feminine singular estera, masculine plural esters, feminine plural esteres)

  1. foreign, overseas

Etymology 2[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *essere, from Latin esse, present active infinitive of sum.

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

ester

  1. to be
Conjugation[edit]

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Noun[edit]

ester m ‎(definite singular esteren, indefinite plural estere, definite plural esterne)

  1. Estonian

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin or Vulgar Latin estō, from Latin stō. Compare with estre.

Verb[edit]

ester

  1. to be
  2. to stay; to remain

Usage notes[edit]

According to the Anglo-Norman On-Line Hub, "[i]t is not always possible to make a valid distinction between and ester and estre"[1].

Conjugation[edit]

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. This verb is highly irregular. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ ester on the Anglo-Norman On-Line Hub. Retrieved August 29 2016

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Noun[edit]

ester m inan

  1. ester (organic compound)

Declension[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

ester c

  1. an ester
  2. indefinite plural of est

Declension[edit]