ester

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See also: Ester, éster, and Estèr

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From German Ester, perhaps a contraction or abstraction of Essigäther (ethyl acetate), from Essig (vinegar) (from Latin acetum) and Äther (ether). See ether for more.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ester (plural esters)

  1. (organic chemistry) A compound most often formed by the condensation of an alcohol and an acid, with elimination of water, which contains the functional group carbon-oxygen double bond joined via carbon to another oxygen atom.
    • 1991, Malcolm B. Hale et al., “New Products and Markets for Menhaden, Brevoortia spp.”, in Marine Fisheries Review, volume 53, number 4, page 47:
      To produce a test material containing at least 75 percent omega-3 polyunsaturates, the menhaden triglycerides are transesterified to produce fatty acid ethyl esters. The esters are reacted with urea dissolved in hot ethanol and the solution is cooled overnight.
    • 1991, W. F. Kean, C. J. L. Lock, and H. E. Howard-Lock, “Chirality in antirheumatic drugs”, in The Lancet, volume 338, DOI:10.1016/0140-6736(91)92382-C, page 1567:
      The thiol-coenzyme-A ester formed by R-arylpropionic acid can bind to triglyceride to form a “hybrid” triglyceride: such hybrid triglycerides can cause alteration of fatty-acid metabolism and membrane function, and a lipophilic triglyceride–propionic-acid hybrid would be able to cross lipid membranes such as the blood–brain barrier.
    • 1996, Steven Ashley, “Composite car structures pass the crash test”, in Mechanical Engineering[1], volume 118, number 12, page 60:
      The effort’s primary material systems are vinyl esters and polyurethanes, reinforced with inexpensive chopped-glass rovings. Automated glass-fiber preforming processes and high-rate molding procedures are being studied in an effort to reduce cycle times and production costs substantially.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Cornish[edit]

Noun[edit]

ester f (singulative estren)

  1. oysters

Czech[edit]

Noun[edit]

ester m

  1. ester

Further reading[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

ester c (singular definite esteren, plural indefinite estere)

  1. Estonian
Declension[edit]
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From German Ester

Noun[edit]

ester c (singular definite esteren, plural indefinite estere)

  1. ester
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from German Ester.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛs.tər/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

ester m (plural esters, diminutive estertje n)

  1. (organic chemistry) ester

Estonian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

ester (genitive estri, partitive estrit)

  1. (organic chemistry) ester

Declension[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French ester, from Vulgar Latin *estō, from Classical Latin stō (cf. also the juridical Medieval Latin senses), from Proto-Indo-European *steh₂-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

ester

  1. (law, rare) to appear
  2. (archaic) to be
Conjugation[edit]

Only used in the infinitive, present participle estant and past participle esté.

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From German Essig-Äther (acetic acid ethyl ester).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ester m (plural esters)

  1. (organic chemistry) ester

Anagrams[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Ladin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin exterus, from exter.

Adjective[edit]

ester m (feminine singular estera, masculine plural esters, feminine plural esteres)

  1. foreign, overseas

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin sum.

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

ester

  1. to be
Conjugation[edit]
  • Ladin conjugation varies from one region to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English ēaster.

Noun[edit]

ester (plural esters)

  1. Easter (Christian holiday)
    • c. 1280, “Vita sancti Brendani, Abbatis de Hybernia”, in Carl Horstmann, editor, The Early South English Legendary or Lives of Saints[2], London: N. Trübner & Co., published 1887, page 224:
      To a stede ȝe schulle hunne wende : þurf oure louerdes grace, / Þat is foweles parays : a wel ioyful place : / Þer ȝe schulle þis ester beo : & þis wit-sonedai also.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • c. 1300, Robert of Gloucester, William Aldis Wright, editor, The Metrical Chronicle of Robert of Gloucester, London: Eyre and Spottiswoode, published 1887, page 556:
      Þre siþe he ber croune aȝer · to midewinter at gloucestre · / To witesonetid at westmunstre · to ester at wincestre ·
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • a. 1402, John Trevisa, transl., “De regione lodœœ”, in Joseph Rawson Lumby, editor, Polychronicon, page 111:
      Mysbyleued men mysdede neuere þat chirche ; and þat is, as me troweþ, for euery ȝere an Ester eue comeþ fire from heuene, and tendeþ and liȝteþ þe lamps þerynne ; but whan þat miracle bygan first, hit is vncertayne and vnknowe.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

References[edit]

ēster(n, n., MED14534.” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Noun[edit]

ester m (definite singular esteren, indefinite plural estere, definite plural esterne)

  1. Estonian

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin or Vulgar Latin estō, from Latin stō. Compare with estre.

Verb[edit]

ester

  1. to be
  2. to stay; to remain

Usage notes[edit]

According to the Anglo-Norman On-Line Hub, "[i]t is not always possible to make a valid distinction between and ester and estre"[1].

Conjugation[edit]

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. This verb is highly irregular. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle French: ester

References[edit]

  1. ^ ester on the Anglo-Norman On-Line Hub. Retrieved August 29 2016

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Noun[edit]

ester m inan

  1. ester (organic compound)

Declension[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

ester c

  1. an ester
  2. indefinite plural of est

Declension[edit]

Declension of ester (an ester)
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative ester estern estrar estrarna
Genitive esters esterns estrars estrarnas

Anagrams[edit]