carbon

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See also: Carbon, carbón, and càrbon

English[edit]

Chemical element
C
Previous: boron (B)
Next: nitrogen (N)

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French carbone, coined by Antoine Lavoisier, from Latin carbō, carbōnem (charcoal, coal), from Proto-Indo-European *ker- (to burn).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

carbon (countable and uncountable, plural carbons)

  1. (uncountable) The chemical element (symbol C) with an atomic number of 6. It can be found in pure form for example as graphite, a black, shiny and very soft material, or diamond, a colourless, transparent, crystalline solid and the hardest known material.
  2. (countable) An atom of this element, in reference to a molecule containing it.
    A methane molecule is made up of a single carbon with four hydrogens.
  3. (countable, informal) A sheet of carbon paper.
    • 1939, Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep, Penguin, published 2011, page 51:
      He stepped back and opened his bag and took out a printed pad of D.O.A. forms and began to write over a carbon.
  4. (countable, informal) A carbon copy.
  5. A fossil fuel that is made of impure carbon such as coal or charcoal.
  6. (ecology, uncountable) Carbon dioxide, in the context of global warming and climate change.
  7. A carbon rod or pencil used in an arc lamp.
  8. A plate or piece of carbon used as one of the elements of a voltaic battery.
  9. (informal) Ellipsis of carbon fiber (reinforced polymer).
    carbon bike frame

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

carbon (third-person singular simple present carbons, present participle carboning, simple past and past participle carboned)

  1. (Internet, transitive, uncommon) To cause (someone) to receive a carbon copy of an email message.
    Synonyms: cc, copy
    When I send it, I'll carbon Julia so she's aware.

See also[edit]

carbon related terms

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • karbon (rare, but now official)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

carbon n (singular definite carbonet, not used in plural form)

  1. (chemistry) carbon
    Synonym: kulstof

Usage notes[edit]

While kul (coal) is never used to refer to the element of carbon, it may sometimes replace it in names of derivations, such as kuldioxid/carbondioxid, kulsyre, kulilte/carbonmonoxid.

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kɑrˈbɔn/
  • Hyphenation: car‧bon
  • Rhymes: -ɔn

Etymology 1[edit]

Probably borrowed from French carbone, ultimately from Latin carbō. The sense “fibre-reinforced polymer” derived from English carbon.

Noun[edit]

carbon n (uncountable, diminutive carbonnetje n)

  1. fibre-reinforced polymer
  2. black diamond

Etymology 2[edit]

From carbonpapier.

Noun[edit]

carbon n (uncountable, diminutive carbonnetje n)

  1. carbon paper

Romanian[edit]

Romanian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ro
Chemical element
C
Previous: bor (B)
Next: azot (N)

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French carbone, coined by Lavoisier, from Latin carbō, carbōnem (charcoal, coal), from Proto-Indo-European *ker- (to burn). Doublet of cărbune, inherited from the same Latin source.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /karˈbon/
  • Hyphenation: car‧bon

Noun[edit]

carbon n (uncountable)

  1. carbon (chemical element)

Declension[edit]

References[edit]


Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin carbō, carbōnem.

Noun[edit]

carbon m (genitive singular carboin, no plural)

  1. carbon (element)
    Synonym: gualan

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
carbon charbon
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English carbon.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

carbon m (uncountable)

  1. carbon

Synonyms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
carbon garbon ngharbon charbon
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present) , “carbon”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies