ogle

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See also: øgle, öğle, and oglē

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • augle (Northern England)

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch *ooghelen, oeghelen (to ogle), frequentative form of oogen (to eye); or from Middle Low German ogelen (to look at, ogle), frequentative of ogen, ougen (to eye, see), equivalent to og- +‎ -le. Compare German äugeln (to ogle). More at eye, -le.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

ogle (third-person singular simple present ogles, present participle ogling, simple past and past participle ogled)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To stare at (someone or something), especially impertinently, amorously, or covetously.
    • Dryden
      And ogling all their audience, ere they speak.

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

ogle (plural ogles)

  1. An impertinent, flirtatious, amorous or covetous stare.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latvian[edit]

Wikipedia-logo.png
 Ogle on Latvian Wikipedia

Wikipedia lv

Ogle (1)
Akmeņogle (2)

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (dialectal forms) oglis

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Baltic *anglis, from Proto-Indo-European *angl- (coal) (< *h₁ongʷl-). Cognates include Lithuanian anglìs, Old Prussian anglis, Old Church Slavonic ѫгль (ǫglĭ), Russian уголь (úgol’), Belarusian вуголь (vúgol’), Ukrainian вугіль (vúgil’), Bulgarian въгле (vǎ́gle), Czech uhel, Polish węgiel.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

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Noun[edit]

ogle f (5th declension)

  1. charcoal (partially burnt organic materials, usually wood)
    aktīvā ogle, aktivētā ogle — activated carbon
    melns kā ogle — black as charcoal
    ogles zīmējumi — charcoal drawings
    kvēlojošas ogles — burning coals
  2. (syn. akmeņogle) coal (mineral deposits, used as industrial fuel)
    ogļu atradnescoal deposits
    ogļu ieguvecoal mining
    ogļu rūpniecībacoal industry

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “ogle” in Konstantīns Karulis (1992, 2001), Latviešu Etimoloģijas Vārdnīca (Rīga: AVOTS) ISBN: 9984-700-12-7.