atom

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See also: Atom, atóm, àtom, atom-, and atom'

English[edit]

A stylized representation of a lithium atom based on the Rutherford model

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French athome, from Latin atomus(smallest particle), from Ancient Greek ἄτομος(átomos, indivisible), from ἀ-(a-, not) +‎ τέμνω(témnō, I cut).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: a‧tom

Noun[edit]

atom ‎(plural atoms)

  1. (chemistry, physics) The smallest possible amount of matter which still retains its identity as a chemical element, now known to consist of a nucleus surrounded by electrons. [from 16th c.]
  2. (history of science) A hypothetical particle posited by Greek philosophers as an ultimate and indivisible component of matter. [from 15th c.]
    A molecule is a close combination of atoms.
    • 2013 September–October, Katie L. Burke, “In the news: Photosynthesis precursor”, in American Scientist[1], archived from the original on 13 April 2016:
      Oxygen levels on Earth skyrocketed 2.4 billion years ago, when cyanobacteria evolved photosynthesis: the ability to convert water and carbon dioxide into carbohydrates and waste oxygen using solar energy. The evolutionary precursor of photosynthesis is still under debate, and a new study sheds light. The critical component of the photosynthetic system is the water-oxidizing complex, made up of manganese atoms and a calcium atom.
  3. (now generally regarded figuratively) The smallest, indivisible constituent part or unit of something. [from 17th c.]
    • 1835, John Ross; James Clark Ross, “Chapter XXXIV. Labour in Cutting through the Ice—Become Fixed for the Winter—Summary of the Month.”, in Narrative of a Second Voyage in Search of a North-west Passage, and of a Residence in the Arctic Regions, during the Years 1829, 1830, 1831, 1832, 1833; by Sir John Ross, C.B., K.S.A., K.C.S., &c. &c. Captain in the Royal Navy. Including the Reports of Commander (now Captain) J. C. Ross, R.N., F.R.S., F.L.S., &c. and the Discovery of the Northern Magnetic Pole, Philadelphia, Pa.: E. A. Carey & A. Hart; Baltimore, Md.: Carey, Hart & Co., OCLC 936607945, pages 283–284:
      Towards the following morning, the thermometer fell to 5°; and at daylight, there was not an atom of water to be seen in any direction.
  4. (now historical) The smallest medieval unit of time, equal to fifteen ninety-fourths of a second. [from 10th c.]
  5. A mote of dust in a sunbeam. [from 16th c.]
  6. A very small amount; a whit. [from 17th c.]
    • 1873, “Pansy” [pseudonym; Isabella Macdonald Alden], “A Double Crisis”, in Three People, Cincinnati, Oh.: Western Tract and Book Society, 176 Elm Street, OCLC 29248538, page 325:
      "Doctor, tell me one word more," said Theodore, quivering with suppressed emotion. "How do you think it will end?" / "I have hardly the faintest atom of hope," answered this honest, earnest man.
    • 1945 May, George Orwell, chapter 1, in Animal Farm: A Fairy Story, London: Secker & Warburg, OCLC 3655473:
      Now, comrades, what is the nature of this life of ours? Let us face it, our lives are miserable, laborious, and short. We are born, we are given just so much food as will keep the breath in our bodies, and those of us who are capable of it are forced to work to the last atom of our strength; and the very instant that our usefulness has come to an end we are slaughtered with hideous cruelty. No animal in England knows the meaning of happiness or leisure after he is a year old. No animal in England is free. The life of an animal is misery and slavery: that is the plain truth.
  7. (computing, programming, Lisp) An individual number or symbol, as opposed to a list; a scalar value. [from 20th c.]
  8. (mathematics, algebra) A non-zero member of a Boolean algebra that is not a union of any other elements. [from 20th c.]
  9. (mathematics, set theory) An element of a set that is not itself a set; an urelement. [from 20th c.]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Noun[edit]

atom m

  1. (physics) atom

Related terms[edit]

External links[edit]

  • atom in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • atom in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /atoːm/, [aˈtˢoːˀm]

Noun[edit]

atom n (singular definite atomet, plural indefinite atomer)

  1. atom

Inflection[edit]


Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English atom, from Ancient Greek ἄτομος(átomos, indivisible), from ἀ-(a-, not) + τέμνω(témnō, I cut).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈɒtom]
  • Hyphenation: atom

Noun[edit]

atom ‎(plural atomok)

  1. atom

Declension[edit]

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative atom atomok
accusative atomot atomokat
dative atomnak atomoknak
instrumental atommal atomokkal
causal-final atomért atomokért
translative atommá atomokká
terminative atomig atomokig
essive-formal atomként atomokként
essive-modal
inessive atomban atomokban
superessive atomon atomokon
adessive atomnál atomoknál
illative atomba atomokba
sublative atomra atomokra
allative atomhoz atomokhoz
elative atomból atomokból
delative atomról atomokról
ablative atomtól atomoktól
Possessive forms of atom
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. atomom atomjaim
2nd person sing. atomod atomjaid
3rd person sing. atomja atomjai
1st person plural atomunk atomjaink
2nd person plural atomotok atomjaitok
3rd person plural atomjuk atomjaik

Derived terms[edit]

(Compound words):

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tótfalusi István, Idegenszó-tár: Idegen szavak értelmező és etimológiai szótára. Tinta Könyvkiadó, Budapest, 2005, ISBN 963 7094 20 2

Malay[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English atom, from Old French atome, from Latin atomus, from Ancient Greek ἄτομος(átomos).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

atom ‎(plural atom-atom, possessives atomku, atommu, atomnya, with particles atomkah, atomlah)

  1. (physics) atom (physics: smallest possible amount of matter retaining its chemical properties)

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek atomos

Noun[edit]

atom n ‎(definite singular atomet, indefinite plural atom or atomer, definite plural atoma or atomene)

  1. an atom

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek atomos

Noun[edit]

atom n ‎(definite singular atomet, indefinite plural atom, definite plural atoma)

  1. an atom

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

atom m inan

  1. (physics) atom

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

External links[edit]

  • atom in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

atom m ‎(plural atomi)

  1. atom
Declension[edit]

External links[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek ἄτομος(átomos).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ǎtoːm/
  • Hyphenation: a‧tom

Noun[edit]

àtōm m ‎(Cyrillic spelling а̀то̄м)

  1. atom

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • atom” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

atom c

  1. atom; the smallest particle to retain the properties of the element
  2. (historical) atom; the theoretically smallest possible particle

Declension[edit]

Inflection of atom 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative atom atomen atomer atomerna
Genitive atoms atomens atomers atomernas

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from French atome.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

atom ‎(definite accusative atomu, plural atomlar)

  1. (physics) atom

Declension[edit]