platform

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English[edit]

platform stage (1)
railroad platforms (6) on the Long Island Rail Road (LIRR)
rock platform (11)

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French plateforme (a flat form), from plate (flat) (from Old French plat, from Ancient Greek πλατύς (platús, flat)) + forme (form) (from Latin fōrma (shape; figure; form)); compare flatscape.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

platform (plural platforms)

  1. A raised stage from which speeches are made and on which musical and other performances are made.
    Synonyms: dais, (speeches) podium
    • 1918, W[illiam] B[abington] Maxwell, chapter 13, in The Mirror and the Lamp, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, OCLC 4293071:
      []  They talk of you as if you were Croesus—and I expect the beggars sponge on you unconscionably.” And Vickers launched forth into a tirade very different from his platform utterances. He spoke with extreme contempt of the dense stupidity exhibited on all occasions by the working classes.
  2. A raised floor for any purpose, e.g. for workmen during construction, or formerly for military cannon.
    Hyponyms: oil platform, work platform
  3. (figuratively) A place or an opportunity to express one's opinion.
    Synonym: tribune
    This new talk show will give a platform to everyday men and women.
    • 2021 September 28, Scott Cacciola, “LeBron James said he was vaccinated, after previously evading the question.”, in The New York Times[1], ISSN 0362-4331:
      [LeBron] James did not say which vaccine he had taken or the number of doses he had received. He also said that he would not use his platform to publicly encourage others to be vaccinated.
  4. (figuratively) Something that allows an enterprise to advance.
    Synonyms: foundation, stage
    • 2012 September 7, Phil McNulty, “Moldova 0-5 England”, in BBC Sport[2]:
      Hidgson may actually feel England could have scored even more but this was the perfect first step on the road to Rio in 2014 and the ideal platform for the second qualifier against Ukraine at Wembley on Tuesday.
  5. (politics, figuratively) A political stance on a broad set of issues, which are called planks.
    • 1652, Gerrard Winstanley, chapter 1, in The Law of Freedom in a Platform:
      Now if the earth could be enjoyed in such a manner as every one might have provision, as it may by this platform I have offered, then will the peace of the commonwealth be preserved, and men need not act so hypocritically as the clergy do, and others likewise, to get a living.
    • 1936, Communist Election Platform 1936, New York City: Workers Library Publishers, page 6:
      The Communist Party and its candidates stand on the following platform, which expresses the immediate interests of the majority of the population of our country.
    • 1972, Mike Gravel, Citizen Power: A People's Platform, New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, →ISBN, page xii:
      Surely there is nothing strange or new or threatening about such a platform. It will distress only those who have the essentially un-American view that change itself is frightening and should be avoided at all costs.
  6. (rail transport) A raised structure from which passengers can enter or leave a train, metro etc.
    Hyponym: island platform
    • 1897 December (indicated as 1898), Winston Churchill, chapter 5, in The Celebrity: An Episode, New York, N.Y.: The Macmillan Company; London: Macmillan & Co., Ltd., OCLC 222716698:
      We expressed our readiness, and in ten minutes were in the station wagon, rolling rapidly down the long drive, for it was then after nine. [] As we reached the lodge we heard the whistle, and we backed up against one side of the platform as the train pulled up at the other.
    • 1997 June 26, J. K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (Harry Potter; 1), London: Bloomsbury Publishing, →ISBN:
      “Well, there you are, boy. Platform nine — platform ten. Your platform should be somewhere in the middle, but they don’t seem to have built it yet, do they?”
    • 2013 June 1, “Ideas coming down the track”, in The Economist[3], volume 407, number 8838, page 13 (Technology Quarterly):
      A “moving platform” scheme [] is more technologically ambitious than maglev trains even though it relies on conventional rails. [] Stopping high-speed trains wastes energy and time, so why not simply slow them down enough for a moving platform to pull alongside?
  7. (clothing, in the plural) Ellipsis of platform shoe: a kind of high shoe with an extra layer between the inner and outer soles.
    • 2001 [1999], Helen Fielding, Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason, New York: Penguin, →ISBN, page 167:
      Walk to Shazzer's from polling station was hideous walk of shame. Also cannot wear platforms now as feet too crippled so will look short.
  8. (Internet) Ellipsis of digital platform: a software system used to provide online services to clients, such as social media, e-commerce, cloud computing etc.
    Hyponyms: container platform, microservices platform
    • 2013 June 1, “End of the peer show”, in The Economist[4], volume 407, number 8838, page 71:
      Finance is seldom romantic. But the idea of peer-to-peer lending comes close. This is an industry that brings together individual savers and lenders on online platforms. Those that want to borrow are matched with those that want to lend.
    • 2014, Astra Taylor, “Preface”, in The People's Platform: Taking Back Power and Culture in the Digital Age, Henry Holt and Company, →ISBN:
      In fact, wealth and power are shifting to those who control the platforms on which all of us create, consume, and connect.
  9. (computing) Ellipsis of computing platform: a particular type of operating system or environment such as a database or other specific software, and/or a particular type of computer or microprocessor, used to describe a particular environment for running other software.
    That program runs on the X Window System platform.
    • 1996 September 23, “Intel attacks Mac publishing niche”, in Computerworld, volume 30, number 39, ISSN 0010-4841, page 56:
      “We used to produce our publication on the Mac, but the Wintel platform is cheaper and there are just as many applications available. So it just seemed to make sense to give up the religious war and get on with the business of doing our job,” said the information systems manager at a New York-based magazine, who asked not to be named.
  10. (automotive) Ellipsis of car platform: a set of components shared by several vehicle models.
    • 2017, Vinod K. Jain, Global Strategy: Competing in the Connected Economy, Routledge, →ISBN, page 131:
      A car platform consists of the underbody, suspension, and axles, plus components such as the steering mechanism, engine, and powertrain. Using such a platform, a car company can design several distinct car models to suit different customer groups []
  11. (geology) A flat expanse of rock, often the result of wave erosion.
    • 2019, Reed Wicander; James S. Monroe, Geology: Earth in Perspective, Cengage Learning, →ISBN, page 319:
      Wave erosion causes a sea cliff to migrate landward, leaving a gently sloping surface, called a wave-cut platform. A wave-built platform originates by deposition at the seaward margin of the wave-cut platform.
  12. (nautical) A light deck, usually placed in a section of the hold or over the floor of the magazine.
  13. (obsolete) A plan; a sketch; a model; a pattern.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

platform (third-person singular simple present platforms, present participle platforming, simple past and past participle platformed)

  1. (transitive) To furnish with or shape into a platform
    • 1885, Frances Elliot, The Diary of an Idle Woman in Sicily[5], page 192:
      [] upon a smiling knoll platformed by Nature []
  2. (transitive) To place on, or as if on, a platform.
    • 1844, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, To Flush, My Dog
      And this dog was satisfied / If a pale thin hand would glide / Down his dewlaps sloping / Which he pushed his nose within, / After—platforming his chin / On the palm left open.
  3. (rail transport) To place a train alongside a station platform.
    • 2021 December 1, Paul Stephen, “Network News: Battery and hydrogen trains showcased to PM at COP26”, in RAIL, number 945, page 14:
      There he was welcomed onboard Vivarail's new three-car battery-powered train and Porterbrook's HydroFLEX hydrogen-powered train, which had been platformed side-by-side to showcase the potential of these low-carbon alternative technologies.
  4. (politics, transitive) To include in a political platform
    • 1955, Amy Lowell, Complete Poetical Works[6], page 408:
      Among them I scarcely can plot out one truth / Plain enough to be platformed by some voting sleuth / And paraded before the precinct polling-booth.
  5. (transitive) To publish or make visible; to provide a platform for (a topic etc.).
    Antonyms: deplatform, no-platform
    • 2020 May 28, Bhumika Popli, “Menstrual Hygiene Day: Changing mindsets with ‘period leave’”, in The New Indian Express:
      We want to platform the larger, unspoken issue of menstrual health and hygiene of women at work, and how we as a society need to start taking cognizance of it and start adopting measures to help our women workforce navigate it with ease.
    • 2020 July 29, Conor Friedersdorf, “Purity Politics Makes Nothing Happen”, in The Atlantic:
      If Buckley were still alive today, could a university get away with platforming him in a debate?
  6. (film, transitive) To open (a film) in a small number of theaters before a broader release in order to generate enthusiasm.
    • 1981 September 2, Aljean Harmetz, “Comes Fall, a Chance for Serious Movies?”, in The New York Times, page C21:
      But serious movies are not necessarily good movies. A studio that decides to platform a film had better be sure the film will get the necessary good reviews and audience approval. Otherwise, like United Artists' "A Small Circle of Friends," which was platformed around the same time as "The Elephant Man," the film will fail calamitously.
    • 1993 November 25, Bernard Weinraub, “For Movie Industry, Thanksgiving Means A Box-Office Feast”, in The New York Times, page C11:
      Each of these films will be "platformed," the industry term to describe the strategy of opening a movie first in a limited number of theaters to give it an aura of exclusivity, then having its appeal build through word of mouth.
  7. (obsolete, transitive) To form a plan of; to model; to lay out.
    • 1642, John Milton, The Reason of Church-Government Urg’d against Prelaty; republished in A Complete Collection of the Historical, Political, and Miscellaneous Works of John Milton, [], volume I, Amsterdam [actually London: s.n.], 1698, OCLC 926209975, page 202:
      I have ſaid what is meet to ſome who do not think it for the eaſe of their inconſequent Opinions, to grant that Church-Diſcipline is platform'd in the Bible, but that it is left to the diſcretion of Men.

Further reading[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Middle French plateforme.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈplɑt.fɔrm/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: plat‧form

Noun[edit]

platform n (plural platformen or platforms, diminutive platformpje n)

  1. A platform, flat surface, notably a dais or stage
  2. A political platform, (electoral) program
  3. A plateau
  4. A flat roof
  5. (obsolete) A ground-plan

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Afrikaans: platform
  • Indonesian: platform

Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Plattform, from French plateforme.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈplɒtform]
  • Hyphenation: plat‧form
  • Rhymes: -orm

Noun[edit]

platform (plural platformok)

  1. (politics) platform (electoral program)
  2. (computing) platform (a particular type of operating system or environment)
  3. platform (a flat surface)

Declension[edit]

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative platform platformok
accusative platformot platformokat
dative platformnak platformoknak
instrumental platformmal platformokkal
causal-final platformért platformokért
translative platformmá platformokká
terminative platformig platformokig
essive-formal platformként platformokként
essive-modal
inessive platformban platformokban
superessive platformon platformokon
adessive platformnál platformoknál
illative platformba platformokba
sublative platformra platformokra
allative platformhoz platformokhoz
elative platformból platformokból
delative platformról platformokról
ablative platformtól platformoktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
platformé platformoké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
platforméi platformokéi
Possessive forms of platform
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. platformom platformjaim
2nd person sing. platformod platformjaid
3rd person sing. platformja platformjai
1st person plural platformunk platformjaink
2nd person plural platformotok platformjaitok
3rd person plural platformjuk platformjaik

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tótfalusi, István. Idegenszó-tár: Idegen szavak értelmező és etimológiai szótára (’A Storehouse of Foreign Words: an explanatory and etymological dictionary of foreign words’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2005. →ISBN

Further reading[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch platform, from Middle French plateforme (Modern French plate-forme), from Ancient Greek πλατύς (platús, flat)) + Latin fōrma (shape; figure; form).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈplatfɔrm]
  • Hyphenation: plat‧form

Noun[edit]

platform

  1. platform,
    1. a plan; a sketch; a model; a pattern.
      Synonyms: program, rencana
    2. a raised stage from which speeches are made and on which musical and other performances are made.
      Synonyms: panggung, pentas, mimbar
    3. a raised structure from which passengers can enter or leave a train, metro etc.
      Synonym: peron
  2. a political platform, (electoral) program.

Further reading[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French plateforme.

Noun[edit]

platform (definite accusative platformu, plural platformlar)

  1. platform
  2. (transport, travel) platform

Declension[edit]

Inflection
Nominative platform
Definite accusative platformu
Singular Plural
Nominative platform platformlar
Definite accusative platformu platformları
Dative platforma platformlara
Locative platformda platformlarda
Ablative platformdan platformlardan
Genitive platformun platformların
Possessive forms
Nominative
Singular Plural
1st singular platformum platformlarım
2nd singular platformun platformların
3rd singular platformu platformları
1st plural platformumuz platformlarımız
2nd plural platformunuz platformlarınız
3rd plural platformları platformları
Definite accusative
Singular Plural
1st singular platformumu platformlarımı
2nd singular platformunu platformlarını
3rd singular platformunu platformlarını
1st plural platformumuzu platformlarımızı
2nd plural platformunuzu platformlarınızı
3rd plural platformlarını platformlarını
Dative
Singular Plural
1st singular platformuma platformlarıma
2nd singular platformuna platformlarına
3rd singular platformuna platformlarına
1st plural platformumuza platformlarımıza
2nd plural platformunuza platformlarınıza
3rd plural platformlarına platformlarına
Locative
Singular Plural
1st singular platformumda platformlarımda
2nd singular platformunda platformlarında
3rd singular platformunda platformlarında
1st plural platformumuzda platformlarımızda
2nd plural platformunuzda platformlarınızda
3rd plural platformlarında platformlarında
Ablative
Singular Plural
1st singular platformumdan platformlarımdan
2nd singular platformundan platformlarından
3rd singular platformundan platformlarından
1st plural platformumuzdan platformlarımızdan
2nd plural platformunuzdan platformlarınızdan
3rd plural platformlarından platformlarından
Genitive
Singular Plural
1st singular platformumun platformlarımın
2nd singular platformunun platformlarının
3rd singular platformunun platformlarının
1st plural platformumuzun platformlarımızın
2nd plural platformunuzun platformlarınızın
3rd plural platformlarının platformlarının

Synonyms[edit]