roof

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See also: Roof

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
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Tiled roofs covering buildings.

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English rof, from Old English hrōf (roof, ceiling; top, summit; heaven, sky), from Proto-Germanic *hrōfą (roof), from Proto-Indo-European *krāpo- (roof), from Proto-Indo-European *krāwǝ- (to cover, heap).

Cognate with Scots ruif (roof), Dutch roef (a cabin, wooden cover, deckhouse), Low German rof (roof), Icelandic hróf (a shed under which ships are built or kept, roof of a boathouse).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɹuːf/, /ɹʊf/
  • (file)
    ,
    (file)
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʊf, -uːf

Noun[edit]

roof (plural rooves or roofs)

  1. The external covering at the top of a building
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      Pretty soon I struck into a sort of path […]. It twisted and turned, [] and opened out into a big clear space like a lawn. And, back of the lawn, was a big, old-fashioned house, with piazzas stretching in front of it, and all blazing with lights. 'Twas the house I'd seen the roof of from the beach.
    • 1931, Robert L. May, Rudolph, The Red-Nosed Reindeer, Montgomery Ward (publisher), draft:
      The very first sound that you’ll hear on the roof / (Provided there’s fog) will be Rudolph’s small hoof.
  2. The upper part of a cavity.
    • 2011 October 1, John Sinnott, “Aston Villa 2-0 Wigan”, in BBC Sport:
      As Bent pulled away to the far post, Agbonlahor opted to go it alone, motoring past Gary Caldwell before unleashing a shot into the roof of the net.
    The palate is the roof of the mouth.
    Archaeologists discovered that the cave's roof was decked with paintings.
  3. (mining) The surface or bed of rock immediately overlying a bed of coal or a flat vein.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Both roofs and rooves are listed as plurals in the Oxford Dictionary of English, 2005 edition, though there seems to be differences in usage between Britain and America.
  • In referring to the top of a building, it can refer both to the object itself (“the roof was blown off in the tornado”) and to the location of being on the roof (“it can be dangerous to go up to the roof to fix the antenna”). In the latter sense (of location), it is often used attributively, largely interchangeably with rooftop.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

roof (third-person singular simple present roofs, present participle roofing, simple past and past participle roofed)

  1. To cover or furnish with a roof.
  2. To traverse buildings by walking or climbing across their roofs.
  3. (slang) To put into prison for not a short time.
    • 1998 March 4, “Law and Disorder”, in Beverly Hills, 90210, season 08, episode 22:
      Did you see them, David? I mean, did you see them looking at me? I-I'm walking out of the court, and everybody was practically – yeah, they were gawking. […] I mean, Noah roofed me, I proved it, end of story.
    • 2000 January 1, Mr. Metaphor (lyrics), “Stupid”, in The Will Tell Compilation Vol. 1: Thats Right Inc., performed by Word A' Mouth, Block McCloud and Mr. Metaphor:
      I’m open, hype off the chronic I was smoking, feeling zooted
      That Brooklyn shit got me stupid
      I’m loose, kid – that’s what the overproof did
      What the ruck you looking at, son? You’ll get roofed, kid!
    • 2012 November 15, “Brown Bag Wrap”, in Rare Chandeliers, performed by Action Bronson:
      Inhale the mystical, the blue shit
      See me on the stoop shit, act stupid at the park, the ball, get roofed
      Baby see the cops, the drugs, she boofed it
      Foie gras at every meal, that means I triple-goosed it
    • 2018 May 5, AM (lyrics), “Attempted 1.0”, performed by Skengdo and AM of 410:
      You don’t want war, you’re shook of it
      Hella man dash when their friend got roofed

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch roof, from Old Dutch *rōf, *rouf, from Proto-Germanic *raubaz. More at robe.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

roof m (plural roven, diminutive roofje n)

  1. robbery, robbing, banditry, rapine

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

roof

  1. first-person singular present indicative of roven
  2. imperative of roven

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

roof

  1. Alternative form of rof