Dach

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See also: dach, DACH, and dach'

German[edit]

ein Dach

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German dach, from Old High German dah, from Proto-West Germanic *þak, from Proto-Germanic *þaką, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *teg-.

Compare German Low German Dack, Dutch dak, English thack, thatch, Danish tag. Akin to Latin toga (garment) and Ancient Greek στέγος (stégos, roof).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Dach n (strong, genitive Daches or Dachs, plural Dächer, diminutive Dächlein n or Dächelchen n)

  1. roof
  2. (informal) circumflex
    Synonym: Zirkumflex
  3. (colloquial) head, especially the scalp
    Du kriegst gleich was aufs Dach!
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)
  4. (geology) a rock layer above a seam

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Belarusian: дах (dax)
  • Polish: dach
  • Ukrainian: дах (dax)

Proper noun[edit]

Dach m or f (proper noun, surname, masculine genitive Dachs or (with an article) Dach, feminine genitive Dach, plural Dachs)

  1. a surname

Further reading[edit]

  • Dach” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache
  • Dach” in Uni Leipzig: Wortschatz-Lexikon
  • Dach” in Duden online
  • Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg Dach on the German Wikipedia.Wikipedia de

Hunsrik[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German dach, from Old High German dah, from Proto-West Germanic *þak, from Proto-Germanic *þaką.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Dach m (plural Decher, diminutive Dechelche)

  1. roof
    De Dach is foll Reif.
    The roof is full of frost.

Further reading[edit]


Pennsylvania German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German dach, from Old High German dah, from Proto-West Germanic *þak, from Proto-Germanic *þaką.

Pronunciation[edit]

Phonetik.svg This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Noun[edit]

Dach n (plural Decher)

  1. roof

Plautdietsch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

German Low German Dag, from Middle Low German dach, from from Old Saxon dag, from Proto-West Germanic *dag, from Proto-Germanic *dagaz, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰegʷʰ- (to burn).

Cognate with German Tag and English day, among many others. Unrelated to Dak (roof) or Dakj (blanket, cover), see above.

Pronunciation[edit]

Phonetik.svg This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Noun[edit]

Dach m (plural Doag)

  1. day

Coordinate terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]