gata

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English[edit]

Gatas.

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Armenian գաթա (gatʿa).

Noun[edit]

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gata (plural gatas)

  1. A kind of pastry in Armenia and some neighboring countries.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Balinese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

gata

  1. Romanization of ᬕᬢ
  2. Romanization of ᬖᬝ

Bikol Central[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: ga‧ta
  • IPA(key): /ɡaˈta/, [ɡaˈta]

Noun[edit]

gatá

  1. knife used for harvesting rice

See also[edit]

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Late Latin catta.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gata f (plural gates)

  1. female equivalent of gat

Adjective[edit]

gata f sg

  1. feminine singular of gat

Fijian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cognate with Proto-Polynesian *ŋata (compare Maori ngata, Samoan gata, Tongan ngata and Niuean gata), earlier *ŋʷata, from Proto-Oceanic *mwata (snake) (compare Western Fijian ŋwata and Lewo mwata).

Noun[edit]

gata

  1. snake, serpent

Hiligaynon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *ʀataq.

Noun[edit]

gatâ

  1. coconut milk

Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse gata, from Proto-Germanic *gatwǭ.

Noun[edit]

gata f (genitive singular götu, nominative plural götur)

  1. street, road
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From gat (hole).

Verb[edit]

gata (weak verb, third-person singular past indicative gataði, supine gatað)

  1. (transitive) to pierce through
  2. (transitive) specifically, to punch a hole in (using a perforator)
  3. (intransitive, informal) to be stumped (be unable to answer a question)
Conjugation[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

gata

  1. Rōmaji transcription of がた

Masbatenyo[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *ʀataq.

Noun[edit]

gatâ

  1. coconut milk

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

gata m or f

  1. definite feminine singular of gate

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Noun[edit]

gata f (definite singular gata, indefinite plural gater or gator, definite plural gatene or gatone)

  1. definite singular of gate
  2. (pre-2012) alternative form of gate

Old Norse[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *gatwǭ. Likely from the oblique stem *gǫtu of an earlier form *gǫtva, as morphologically gata does not straightforwardly derive from the Proto-Germanic form.[1]

Noun[edit]

gata f (genitive gǫtu, plural gǫtur)

  1. street, road

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kroonen, Guus (2013) Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Germanic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 11), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN

Old Swedish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse gata, from Proto-Germanic *gatwǭ.

Noun[edit]

gata f

  1. street, road

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Pali[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Sanskrit गत (gata).

Adjective[edit]

gata

  1. past participle of gacchati (to go), with active sense.

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Galician-Portuguese gata, from Late Latin catta.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: ga‧ta

Noun[edit]

gata f (plural gatas)

  1. female cat
  2. (slang) very beautiful woman
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

gata

  1. inflection of gatar:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Romagnol[edit]

Noun[edit]

gata f (plural gat)

  1. feminine of gat (cat)

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Origin disputed. Possibly from Proto-Slavic *gotovъ. The word can also be found in Albanian, compare Albanian gati (which, like the Romanian, is also invariable). Alternatively, the word may be of ultimate Paleo-Balkanic or Albanian origin.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

gata m or f or n (indeclinable)

  1. ready, willing
  2. done
    Synonym: terminat

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

gata

  1. readily, willingly

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Noun[edit]

gata (Cyrillic spelling гата)

  1. genitive singular of gat

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Late Latin catta.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡata/ [ˈɡa.t̪a]
  • Rhymes: -ata
  • Syllabification: ga‧ta

Noun[edit]

gata f (plural gatas)

  1. female equivalent of gato (cat); she-cat, molly, queen, female cat
  2. car-jack, jack

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Swedish gata, from Old Norse gata, from Proto-Germanic *gatwǭ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gata c

  1. a street
    • 1937, Evert Taube (lyrics and music), “Fritiof och Carmencita [Fritiof and Carmencita]”:
      Samborombón, en liten by förutan gata. Den ligger inte långt från Rio de la Plata. Nästan i kanten av den blåa Atlanten, och med Pampas bakom sig, många hundra gröna mil. Dit kom jag ridande en afton i april, för jag ville dansa tango.
      Samborombón, a small village without a street. It is located not far from Rio de la Plata. Almost at the edge of the blue Atlantic, and with Pampas behind it [itself], many hundred green miles. There [thither, to there] I came riding one evening in April, because I wanted to tango.
    • 1967, “Lyckliga gatan [[The] Happy Street]”, Britt Lindeborg (lyrics), Adriano Celentano (music), performed by Anna-Lena Löfgren:
      Lyckliga gatan, du finns inte mer. Du har försvunnit med hela kvarter. Tystnat har leken, tystnat har sången. Högt över marken svävar betongen. När jag kom åter var allt så förändrat. Trampat och skövlat, fördärvat och skändat. Skall mellan dessa höga hus en dag stiga en sång, lika förunderlig och skön som den, vi hört en gång?
      [The] Happy Street, you no longer exist. You have disappeared with entire neighborhoods [blocks]. Gone silent has the play, gone silent has the song. High above the ground the concrete hovers. When I came back ["came again" – somewhat dated or poetic], everything was so changed. Trampled and devastated, ruined and desecrated. Shall ["skall" is synonymous with "ska" except matching "shall" in tone] between these tall buildings one day rise a song, as wondrous and fair as the one we [have] once heard?

Usage notes[edit]

Often turns into gatu- (gata + -u-) as a prefix in compounds.

Declension[edit]

Declension of gata 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative gata gatan gator gatorna
Genitive gatas gatans gators gatornas

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Tagalog[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *gatəq, *ʀataq. Compare Hiligaynon gata, Isnag xatta, and Masbatenyo gata.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: ga‧ta
  • IPA(key): /ɡaˈtaʔ/, [ɡɐˈtaʔ]

Noun[edit]

gatâ (Baybayin spelling ᜄᜆ)

  1. coconut milk
  2. (dialectal) plant juice or extract

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • gata”, in Pambansang Diksiyonaryo | Diksiyonaryo.ph, Manila, 2018

Tokelauan[edit]

Te gata.

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Polynesian *ŋata. Cognates include Hawaiian naka and Maori ngata.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈŋa.ta]
  • Hyphenation: ga‧ta

Noun[edit]

gata

  1. snake

References[edit]

  • R. Simona, editor (1986) Tokelau Dictionary[1], Auckland: Office of Tokelau Affairs, page 138