gote

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Gote, göte, gotë, and Göte

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English gote (a drain), from Old English *gote (drain, gutter), from Proto-West Germanic [Term?], from Proto-Germanic *gutō (gutter), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰewd- (to pour).

Cognate with Dutch goot (a gutter, drain, gully), German Gosse (a gutter). Related to Old English gutt (gut, entrails), Old English ġēotan (to pour, pour forth, shed, gush, flow, flood, overwhelm, found, cast). More at gut, yote.

Noun[edit]

gote (plural gotes)

  1. A drain; sluice; ditch or gutter.
  2. (Britain dialectal) A drainage pipe.
  3. (Britain dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) A deep miry place.

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Verb[edit]

gote

  1. (archaic) singular past subjunctive of gieten

Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin gutta.

Noun[edit]

gote f (plural gutis)

  1. drop

Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

gote f

  1. plural of gota

Adjective[edit]

gote

  1. feminine plural of goto

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

gote

  1. Alternative form of goot

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse gata f, from Proto-Germanic *gatwǭ (street, passage). Doublet of gate. Akin to Faroese gøta.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

gote f (definite singular gota, indefinite plural goter, definite plural gotene)

  1. a path, trail
  2. a passage with a fence or gate on either side
    Synonyms: geil, allé

Etymology 2[edit]

A kind of blend of gote f (path) and gatt n (hole), and gjot. The verb is derived from the noun.

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (verb): gota (a- and split infinitives)

Noun[edit]

gote f (definite singular gota, indefinite plural goter, definite plural gotene)

  1. a hole

Verb[edit]

gote (present tense gotar, past tense gota, past participle gota, passive infinitive gotast, present participle gotande, imperative got)

  1. (transitive) to make a hole (in)

Etymology 3[edit]

From the noun got n (spawn).

Alternative forms[edit]

  • gota (a- and split infinitives)

Verb[edit]

gote (present tense gotar, past tense gota, past participle gota, passive infinitive gotast, present participle gotande, imperative got)

  1. (transitive, zoology) to spawn
    Synonym: gyte

Etymology 4[edit]

From Old Norse goti, from Proto-Germanic *gutô.

Noun[edit]

gote m (definite singular goten, indefinite plural gotar, definite plural gotane)

  1. form removed by a 2016 spelling decision; superseded by gotar

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin gutta.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gote f (oblique plural gotes, nominative singular gote, nominative plural gotes)

  1. drop (of liquid)

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: gout, goutte
  • Middle French: goutte
  • Norman: goute