gut

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See also: Gut, GUT, and guts

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English gut, gutte, gotte, from Old English gutt (usually in plural guttas ‎(guts, entrails)), from Proto-Germanic *gut-, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰeud- ‎(to pour). Related to English gote ‎(drain), Old English ġēotan ‎(to pour). More at gote, yote.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gut ‎(plural guts)

  1. The alimentary canal, especially the intestine.
  2. (informal) The abdomen of a person, especially one that is enlarged
    beer gut
  3. (uncountable) The intestines of an animal used to make strings of a tennis racket or violin, etc.
  4. A person's emotional, visceral self.
    I have a funny feeling in my gut.
  5. (informal) A gut course
    You should take Intro Astronomy: it's a gut.
  6. A narrow passage of water.
    the Gut of Canso
  7. The sac of silk taken from a silkworm when ready to spin its cocoon, for the purpose of drawing it out into a thread. When dry, it is exceedingly strong, and is used as the snood of a fishing line.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

gut ‎(third-person singular simple present guts, present participle gutting, simple past and past participle gutted)

  1. (transitive) To eviscerate.
  2. (transitive) To remove or destroy the most important parts of.
    • fire gutted the building
    • Congress gutted the welfare bill.

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

gut ‎(comparative more gut, superlative most gut)

  1. Made of gut, e.g., a violin with gut strings
  2. Instinctive, e.g., a gut reaction

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɡut/, [ɡ̊ud̥]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Norwegian gutt.

Noun[edit]

gut c (singular definite gutten, plural indefinite gutter)

  1. boy, lad, bloke
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From English gut.

Noun[edit]

gut c (singular definite gutten, not used in plural form)

  1. gut (intestines of an animal used to make strings of a tennis racket or violin, etc)

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German guot, from Proto-Germanic *gōdaz, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰedʰ-. Cognate to Dutch and West Frisian goed, English good, Danish, Norwegian and Swedish god.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɡuːt/ (standard)
  • IPA(key): /ɡʊt/ (colloquial, generally only for the interjection)
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uːt

Adjective[edit]

gut ‎(comparative besser, superlative am besten)

  1. good

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Declension[edit]

Adverb[edit]

gut ‎(comparative besser, superlative am besten)

  1. well
    Die Mannschaft hat gut gespielt.
    The team played well.

Interjection[edit]

gut

  1. okay, all right, now then
    Gut, dann fangen wir mal an.
    All right, then let's get started.

External links[edit]

  • gut in Duden online

External links[edit]

  • gut in Duden online

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

gut

  1. rafsi of gunta.

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Noun[edit]

gut m ‎(definite singular guten, indefinite plural gutar, definite plural gutane)

  1. boy (young male)

Romansch[edit]

Noun[edit]

gut m (plural guts)

  1. drop

Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English good.

Adverb[edit]

gut

  1. well

Related terms[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gut

  1. Soft mutation of cut.