academic

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See also: Academic and acadèmic

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From both the Medieval Latin acadēmicus and the French académique, from Latin academia, from Ancient Greek ἀκαδημικός (akadēmikós), from Ἀκαδημία (Akadēmía) or Ἀκαδήμεια (Akadḗmeia), the name of the place where Plato taught; compare academy.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

academic (comparative more academic, superlative most academic)

  1. Belonging to the school or philosophy of Plato [from late 16th century][2]
    the academic sect or philosophy
  2. Belonging to an academy or other higher institution of learning; also a scholarly society or organization. [from late 16th century][2]
  3. Theoretical or speculative; abstract; scholarly, literary or classical, in distinction to practical or vocational; having no practical importance. [from late 19th century][2]
    I have always had an academic interest in hacking.
  4. Having a love of or aptitude for learning.
    I'm more academic than athletic — I get lower marks in phys. ed. than in anything else.
  5. (art) Conforming to set rules and traditions; conventional; formalistic. [from late 19th century][2]
  6. So scholarly as to be unaware of the outside world; lacking in worldliness.
  7. Subscribing to the architectural standards of Vitruvius.
  8. Study of humanities topics rather than science and engineering.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Noun[edit]

academic (plural academics)

  1. (usually capitalized) A follower of Plato, a Platonist. [First attested in the mid 16th century.][2]
  2. A senior member of an academy, college, or university; a person who attends an academy; a person engaged in scholarly pursuits; one who is academic in practice. [First attested in the late 16th century.][2]
    • 2013 September 7, “The multiplexed metropolis”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8852:
      Academics [] see integrated systems for collecting, processing and acting on data as offering a “second electrification” to the world’s metropolises.
  3. A member of the Academy; an academician. [First attested in the mid 18th century.][2]
    • 1621, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy, Oxford: Printed by Iohn Lichfield and Iames Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 216894069:, II.4.2.ii:
      Carneades the academick, when he was to write against Zeno the stoick, purged himself with hellebor first […].
  4. (plural only) Academic dress; academicals. [First attested in the early 19th century.][2]
  5. (plural only) Academic studies. [First attested in the late 20th century.][2]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Philip Babcock Gove (editor), Webster's Third International Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged (G. & C. Merriam Co., 1976 [1909], ISBN 0-87779-101-5)
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 2.8 “academic” in Lesley Brown, editor-in-chief; William R. Trumble and Angus Stevenson, editors, The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary on Historical Principles, 5th edition, Oxford; New York, N.Y.: Oxford University Press, 2002, ISBN 978-0-19-860457-0.

Further reading[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Adjective[edit]

academic

  1. academic

Romanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

academic m, n (feminine singular academică, masculine plural academici, feminine and neuter plural academice)

  1. academic

Declension[edit]