got

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Translingual[edit]

Symbol[edit]

got

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-3 language code for Gothic.

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Verb[edit]

got (third-person singular simple present got or (nonstandard) gots, no present participle, simple past (by suppletion) had, no past participle)

  1. Expressing obligation; used with have.
    I can't go out tonight: I've got to study for my exams.
  2. (informal, with to) Must; have/has (to).
    I got to go study.
    • 1971, Carole King, Gerry Goffin (lyrics and music), “Smackwater Jack”, in Tapestry, Ode Records:
      We got to ride to clean up the streets / For our wives and our daughters!
  3. (informal, sometimes colloquial) Have.
    They got a new car.
    He got a lot of nerve.

Verb[edit]

got

  1. simple past of get
    We got the last bus home.
  2. past participle of get
    By that time we'd got very cold.
    I've got two children.
    How many children have you got?
Usage notes[edit]
  • (expressing obligation): "Got" is a filler word in the following example with no obvious grammatical or semantic function: "I've got to study for my exams" has the same meaning as "I have to study for my exams". It is often stressed in speech: "You've just got to see this."
  • (have): In nonstandard speech, "got" may be reinterpreted as a regular present tense, so that the form gots appears in the third-person singular present, e.g. She gots a red bike.
  • (past participle of get): The second sentence literally means "At some time in the past I got (obtained) two children", but in "have got" constructions like this, where "got" is used in the sense of "obtained", the sense of obtaining is lost, becoming merely one of possessing, and the sentence is in effect just a more colloquial way of saying "I have two children". Similarly, the third sentence is just a more colloquial way of saying "How many children do you have?"
  • (past participle of get): The American and archaic British usage of the verb conjugates as get-got-gotten or as get-got-got depending on the meaning (see Usage Notes on "get" for details), whereas the modern British usage of the verb has mostly lost this distinction and conjugates as get-got-got in most cases.
Synonyms[edit]
  • (must, have (to)): gotta (informal)

Etymology 2[edit]

Analogous to Chinese , such as Hokkien (ū), Cantonese (jau5), Mandarin (yǒu).

Verb[edit]

got (invariable)

  1. (Singlish) Have; there is.
    Got problem is it?
    Got ants over here.
    • 2003, globalise, soc.culture.singapore (Usenet):
      Can become taxi driver only. Take home pay, if no SARS $1,500. If got SARS less than $300.
  2. (Singlish, auxiliary) Marks the completive or experiential aspect.
    You got shower?Have you showered?
    You got ski?Did you go skiing?
    • 2010 August 22, Fiona Chan, The Sunday Times, Singapore, page 13:
      You got send [e-mail] meh? I never receive leh.

References[edit]

  • Nomoto, Hiroki; Lee, Nala Huiying (2012), “Realis, factuality and derived-level statives: Perspectives from the analysis of Singlish got”, in Cahiers Chronos, volume 25, →ISSN

Anagrams[edit]

Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Inherited from Vulgar Latin *gottus, from Latin guttus. Cognate with Ladin got, Venetian goto, Italian gotto.

Noun[edit]

got m (plural gots)

  1. glass (drinking glass)
    Synonyms: tassó, vas

Etymology 2[edit]

Inherited from Latin Gothus.

Noun[edit]

got m (plural gots, feminine goda)

  1. Goth
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Finnish[edit]

Noun[edit]

got

  1. nominative plural of go

German Low German[edit]

Adjective[edit]

got (comparative bȩter or bäter)

  1. Alternative spelling of goot

See also[edit]

Indonesian[edit]

Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch goot (gutter), from Middle Dutch gōte, from Old Dutch *gota, from Proto-Germanic *gutō.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈɡɔt]
  • Hyphenation: got

Noun[edit]

got (first-person possessive gotku, second-person possessive gotmu, third-person possessive gotnya)

  1. gutter, a prepared channel in a surface, especially at the side of a road adjacent to a curb, intended for the drainage of water.
    Synonyms: apuran, selokan

Further reading[edit]

Ladin[edit]

Ladin Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia lld

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *gottus, from Latin guttus. Cognate with Catalan got, Venetian goto, Italian gotto.

Noun[edit]

got m (plural goc)

  1. (Gherdëina, Badiot) glass (drinking glass)
    Bever n got de lat.
    To drink a glass of milk.

Alternative forms[edit]

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch got, from Proto-West Germanic *god, from Proto-Germanic *gudą.

Noun[edit]

got m

  1. god
  2. the Christian God

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Alternative forms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Dutch: god, God
  • Limburgish: gód, Gód

Further reading[edit]

  • got”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “god”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page god

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

got

  1. Alternative form of goot

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

got

  1. Alternative form of gutte

Middle Low German[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Saxon gōd, from Proto-West Germanic *gōd, from Proto-Germanic *gōdaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

gôt (comparative bēter, superlative best)

  1. good
Declension[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Low German: god

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Saxon god, from Proto-West Germanic *god, from Proto-Germanic *gudą.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

got m (genitive godes or gades, plural gode or gade)

  1. god

Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *god, from Proto-Germanic *gudą, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰutós.

Noun[edit]

got m

  1. god

Inflection[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • got”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old High German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *god, from Proto-Germanic *gudą, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰutós.

Compare Old Saxon, Old Frisian, and Old English god, Old Dutch got, Old Norse guð, Gothic 𐌲𐌿𐌸 (guþ).

Noun[edit]

got m

  1. god

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Back-formation from gotyk.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

got m pers (female equivalent gotka)

  1. (music) goth (person who is part of the goth subculture)

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

adjectives
adverb
nouns

Further reading[edit]

  • got in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • got in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French Goth, from Latin Gothus.

Noun[edit]

got m (plural goți)

  1. Goth

Declension[edit]

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Old Swedish gotar. Doublet of gute. Compare origin of göt.

Noun[edit]

got c

  1. (historical) Goth (member of the ancient group of peoples)

Declension[edit]

Declension of got 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative got goten goter goterna
Genitive gots gotens goters goternas

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

got

  1. Soft mutation of cot.

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
cot got nghot chot
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Yola[edit]

Verb[edit]

got

  1. simple past tense of get
    • 1867, “A YOLA ZONG”, in SONGS, ETC. IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, number 14, page 90:
      Jaane got leigheen; shoo pleast aam all, fowe?.
      Joan set them a laughing, she pleased them all, how?

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 90

Zhuang[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Tai *koːtᴰ (to hug; to embrace). Cognate with Thai กอด (gɔ̀ɔt), Lao ກອດ (kǭt), Shan ၵွတ်ႇ (kàut).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

got (1957–1982 spelling got)

  1. to hug; to embrace.