Gott

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: gott, GOtt, and gött

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Possibly from German Gott ("God").

Proper noun[edit]

Gott

  1. A surname​.

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German got, from Proto-Germanic *gudą, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰutós. Compare Dutch and English god, Danish gud, Gothic 𐌲𐌿𐌸 (guþ). The word was neuter in Old High German.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Gott m (genitive Gottes or Gotts, plural Götter, feminine Göttin)

  1. god

Declension[edit]

Earlier (16-18th century) the word Gott was also declined like this:

Hyponyms[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Gott m (genitive Gottes or Gotts)

  1. God

Usage notes[edit]

  • The short genitive Gotts is nowadays exceedingly rare in the proper noun.

Alternative forms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Gott in Duden online

Hunsrik[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • Kot (Portuguese based orthography)

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German got, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰutós.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Gott m (plural Getter)

  1. God
    Mein Gott!
    My God!

Further reading[edit]


Luxembourgish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German got, from Proto-Germanic *gudą. Cognate with German Gott, English god, Dutch god, Icelandic guð, Danish gud.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Gott

  1. God

Noun[edit]

Gott m (plural Gëtter)

  1. god

Nauruan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from German Gott.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Gott

  1. God

Pennsylvania German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare German Gott, Dutch god, English god.

Noun[edit]

Gott m (plural Gedder)

  1. god

Plautdietsch[edit]

Noun[edit]

Gott m (plural Jetta)

  1. god

Proper noun[edit]

Gott m

  1. God

Derived terms[edit]