juice

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See also: JUICE

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English jus, juis, from Old French jus, jous, from Latin jūs (broth, soup, sauce), from Proto-Indo-European *yows-, from *yew- (to mix (of meal preparation)). Doublet of jus. Displaced native Middle English wos, woos (juice), from Old English wōs (juice) and Middle English sew (juice), from Old English sēaw (juice, sap) (> English sew (juice, broth, gravy)).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /d͡ʒuːs/, /d͡ʒɪʊ̯s/
  • (US) IPA(key): /d͡ʒus/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uːs

Noun[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

juice (usually uncountable, plural juices)

  1. (uncountable) A liquid from a plant, especially fruit.
    • 1837 April, J. M. (London), in "Miscellaneous Intelligence: Art. V. Queries and Answers", The Gardener's Magazine, August edition, page 378.
      You are aware, I presume, that immense quantities of sugar are annually made from the juice of the A`cer sacchárinum,[sic] in the west of Pennsylvania and New York, with which our forests abound (Professor Kid, in his Bridgwater Treatise, says they are “cultivated”!); and, as the peculiarities attending the flow of this juice have puzzled me to explain them, I have resolved to state them to you.
    • 1940 November, Dwight M. DeLong, "Studies of Methods and Materials for the Control of the Leafhopper Empoasca fabae as a Bean Pest", Technical Bulletin, No. 740, United States Department of Agriculture, page 26.
      The plant juices of both bean and potato gave strong positive tests, showing that the juices of these plants can readily dissolve copper in some form from bordeaux-mixture residue and absorb it through a permeable membrane.
    Squeeze the orange and some juice will come out.
    Hyponyms: apple juice, orange juice, lemon juice
  2. (countable) A beverage made of juice.
    • 1938, C.B. Hutchison & S.B. Freeborn, Toward Better Agriculture: Report of the Agricultural Experiment Station of the University of California, page 44.
      The bottled juice must be heated to a temperature and for a time sufficient to attain a sterilizing temperature at the coolest point, usually the center of the bottle.
    • 2006, Katie Kitamura, Japanese for Travellers: A Journey, Hamish Hamilton (publ.), page 189.
      My mom placed a glass of juice before her, then looked questioningly towards the son.
    I’d like two orange juices please.
    Hyponyms: apple juice, orange juice, lemon juice
  3. (uncountable) Any liquid resembling juice.
    Hyponym: moo juice
    1. (Scotland) A soft drink.
    2. (uncountable, slang) Liquor.
    3. (informal) The liquid that is used to submerge a substance kept in a container
      Hyponyms: pickle juice (the brine in a jar of pickles), sauerkraut juice (the brine in a jar of sauerkraut)
    4. (slang) The leftover liquid of some wet or damp substance.
      Hyponym: dumpster juice (liquid which oozes out of garbage dumpsters)
  4. (uncountable, slang) Vitality, strength.
    • 1884 July, Alfales Young, "Letter from Salt Lake City", Wallace's Monthly, Vol. X, No. 6, page 450.
      This chance manner of her laying herself fallow gives her an opportunity of recovering her juices, or strength, to enable her to breed a stronger foal.
    • 2019, Timothy Andrews Sayle, Jeffrey A. Engel, Hal Brands, William Inboden (eds.), The Last Card: Inside George W. Bush's Decision to Surge in Iraq, page 161.
      And privately the president says, “Do the Iraqis have the juice to carry this off?”
  5. (uncountable, slang) Political power.
    • 1998, The Hotline, page 16.
      CNBC's Matthews: "The power in the Republican party[sic] in terms of who's got the juice, who knows how to win elections, has clearly moved tonight ... from Capitol Hill, the Newt Gingrich crowd, to the governors' crowd" ("Hardball," CNBC. 11/3).
  6. (uncountable, slang) Petrol; gasoline.
    • 1973, Stephen Barlay, Double Cross: Encounters with Industrial Spies, Hamish Hamilton (publ.), page 227.
      Drove across the road to the petrol station and waited for five minutes—without buying juice.
    • 2009, William J. Holstein, Why GM Matters: Inside the Race to Transform an American Icon, Walker Books, page 137,
      Drivers running short on power could simply stop at a gas station and fill up, obviating the fear of running out of juice on a long and lonely road, always a risk with the EV-1.
    Synonym: dino juice
  7. (uncountable, slang) Electricity.
    • 1915, Berton Braley, The Power Plant[1]:
      This is the shrine of the God That Works,
      Driving away the mists and murks,
      Turning the lightnings into use.
      This is the shrine of the mighty "Juice,"
      Flowing ever the long wires through,
      And making the dream, the Dream come true!
  8. (uncountable, slang) Steroids.
  9. (uncountable, slang, vulgar, sex) Semen.
    • 1981, Susan Griffin, Pornography and Silence: Culture's Revenge Against Nature, page 62, quoting Yvette Clemons, The Skin Flick Rapist.
      The demand that a woman drink semen is repeated throughout pornography. Volume after volume presents such scenes as this which we find in The Skin Flick Rapist: "Maria gagged on his juice. It made him so angry that he reached out with his right hand and pulled at her hair."
    • 2005, Michael Thomas Ford, Tangled Sheets, Kensington Books, page 242.
      I pulled my cock out of North and he fell forward, his face in the cum-soaked laundry. He rolled over on his back and looked up at me. I shook the last drops of juice from my prick.
  10. (uncountable, slang, vulgar, sex) The vaginal lubrication that a female naturally produces when sexually aroused.
    • 1999, Tristan Taormino (ed.), Best Lesbian Erotica 1999, Cleis Press, page 62.
      Lily shuddered and looked at me as I came up from between her legs with her juices dripping all over me.
    • 2006, Donna Lea Simpson, Awaiting the Night, page 247.
      Body singing with pleasure, she found he was right, and her juices flowed as he pulled her back down on his stiffness.
  11. (uncountable, slang) The amount charged by a bookmaker for betting services.
    • 1975, Saul Bellow, Humboldt's Gift [Avon ed., 1976, p. 74]:
      He was a sporting man, a gambler. He had to go into hiding at last, because the juice men were after him. I believe they had even broken his ankles.
  12. (uncountable, slang) Musical agreement between instrumentalists.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

juice (third-person singular simple present juices, present participle juicing, simple past and past participle juiced)

  1. (transitive) To extract the juice from something.
  2. (transitive) To energize or stimulate something.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Dialectal spelling of Jew's, a particle of unclear origin. See Jew's harp for more.

Adjective[edit]

juice (not comparable)

  1. Alternative spelling of Jew's (used in certain set phrases like juice harp)

Danish[edit]

Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English juice.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

juice c (singular definite juicen, not used in plural form)

  1. Juice.
  2. A container containing juice.

Inflection[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin jus, via English juice

Noun[edit]

juice m (definite singular juicen, indefinite plural juicer, definite plural juicene)

  1. juice

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin jus, via English juice

Noun[edit]

juice m (definite singular juicen, indefinite plural juicar, definite plural juicane)

  1. juice

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English juice.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

juice c

  1. fruit juice

Declension[edit]

Declension of juice 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative juice juicen juicer juicerna
Genitive juices juicens juicers juicernas
Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]