tomato juice

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English[edit]

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Noun[edit]

tomato juice (plural tomato juices)

  1. Used other than as an idiom: see tomato,‎ juice.
  2. Juice made from tomatoes. In modern use, this usually refers to the comminuted flesh and juice of cooked tomatoes, prepared commercially.
    • 1839, The Select Circulating Library, v 13, p 1, Philadelphia: Adam Waldie.
      There were the delicate keftas, [] and lastly, the national pillauf, richly coloured with tomato juice, and flavoured with quails.
    • 1847, Eliza Leslie The Lady's Receipt-Book: A Useful Companion for Large or Small Families, Philadelphia: Carey and Hart, pp 66–67:
      TOMATO SWEETBREADS.—Cut up a quarter of a peck (or more) of fine ripe tomatoes; set them over the fire, and let them stew with nothing but their own juice till they go entirely to pieces. Then press them through a sieve, to clear the liquid from the seeds and skins. [. . .] Put [sweetbreads] into a stew-pan with the tomato-juice, seasoned with a little salt and cayenne.
    • 1979 Feb-Mar, Mother Jones Magazine‎, volume 4, page 40: 
      "See those two bottles of tomato juice?" He points to two quart bottles on the counter. "See how in one the tomato juice is settling out?" ... "Personally, I feel that tomato juice in a can doesn't taste good."
    • 1982, Marian Morash, The Victory Garden Cookbook, New York: Alfred A. Knopf, p 316:
      [heading] Canned Tomato Juice [¶] While you have out all the equipment, why not make some homemade tomato juice as well?
    • 2003, Arno Schmidt, Chef's book of formulas, yields, and sizes‎, page 157:
      The juice is always purchased canned. Freshly squeezed tomato juice exists only in the imagination of menu writers.
    • 2004, Scott M. Smith; Gerald S. Albaum, Fundamentals of marketing research‎, page 169:
      About how long has it been since you last bought tomato juice? ... About how often do you buy tomato juice? About how many cans do you buy at a time? ...
  3. (US standard of identity) A food obtained from the unfermented liquid extracted from mature tomatoes of the red or reddish varieties of Lycopersicum esculentum P. Mill, strained free from peel, seeds, and other coarse or hard substances, containing finely divided insoluble solids from the flesh of the tomato.

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