jack

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See also: Jack

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: jăk, IPA(key): /dʒæk/
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  • Rhymes: -æk

Etymology 1[edit]

From Anglo-Norman jacke, Middle French jaque, jacque, from jacques (peasant), from the proper name Jacques. Compare jacquerie.

Noun[edit]

jack (plural jacks)

  1. A coarse mediaeval coat of defence, especially one made of leather. [from 14th c.]
    • 1591, John Harington, translating Ariosto's Orlando Furioso, x. 73 (quoted in e.g. 1822, Robert Nares, A Glossary, page 186):
      Their horsemen are with jacks for most part clad, / Their horses are both swift of course and strong, / They run on horseback with a slender gad, / And like a speare, but that it is more long.
    • 1766, Walter Harris, The history and antiquities of the city of Dublin
      threescore men in jacks or light coats of mail
    • 1786, Francis Grose, A Treatise on Ancient Armour and Weapons, page 15:
      The aketon, gambeson, vambasium, and jack were military vestments, calculated for the defence of the body, differing little from each other, except in their names, their materials and construction were nearly the same, the authorities quoted in the notes, shew they were all composed of many folds of linen, stuffed with cotton, wool or hair, quilted, and commonly covered with leather, made of buck or doe skin.

Etymology 2[edit]

A scissor jack (mechanical device)

Transferative use of the personal name Jack.

Noun[edit]

jack (plural jacks)

  1. A man.
    1. (chiefly capitalized) A name applied to a hypothetical or typical man. [from 14th c.]
      • 1723, The New-England Courant, vol. 80:
        After Dinner they frisk away to some known Place of Rendezvous, where (at Night) every Jack has his Jill and every Jill has her Jack.
    2. (countable, now chiefly US) A man, a fellow; a typical man; men in general. [from 16th c.]
      • c. 1591, William Shakespeare, The Taming of the Shrew, First Folio 1623:
        You have showed a tender fatherly regard / To wish me wed to one half-lunatic, / A madcap ruffian and a swearing Jack [] .
    3. (colloquial) A sailor. [from 17th c.]
    4. (slang) A policeman or detective; (Australia) a military policeman. [from 19th c.]
      • 1935, Bernard O'Donnell, The trials of Mr. Justice Avory (page 219)
        When Wardell arrived on the scene, they were surprised to find that he was unshaven, and did not look too happy. One of them remarked: "The 'Jacks' (detectives) are after you."
      • 2013, Nick Oldham, Big City Jacks:
        'I'd like you to meet DCI Henry Christie,' FB was saying. The older of the two jacks reached forward and gave Henry's right paw a quick tug.
    5. (now rare) A manual laborer. [from 19th c.]
    6. (Canada, US, colloquial) A lumberjack. [from 20th c.]
  2. A device or utensil.
    1. A device for turning a spit; a smokejack or roasting jack. [from 14th c.]
      • 1751, Tobias Smollett, The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle, vol. II, ch. 76:
        Our hero, among his other remarks, had observed, that in this place there was no such utensil as a jack, and that all the spits were turned by dogs [] .
    2. Each of a series of blocks in a harpsichord or the earlier virginial, communicating the action of the key to the quill; sometime also, a hopper in a modern piano. [from 16th c.]
      • 1609, Shakespeare, “Sonnet 128”, in Edward Bliss Reed, editor, Shakespeare's Sonnets, Yale University Press, published 1923, lines 1–14:
        How oft, when thou, my music, music play'st,
        Upon that blessed wood whose motion sounds
        With thy sweet fingers, when thou gently sway'st
        The wiry concord that mine ear confounds,
        Do I envy those jacks that nimble leap
        To kiss the tender inward of thy hand,
        Whilst my poor lips, which should that harvest reap,
        At the wood's boldness by thee blushing stand!
        To be so tickl'd, they would change their state
        And situation with those dancing chips,
        O'er whom thy fingers walk with gentle gait,
        Making dead wood more bless'd than living lips.
        ⁠Since saucy jacks so happy are in this,
        ⁠Give them thy fingers, me thy lips to kiss.
      • 1923, Charles Talbut Onions, “Notes”, in Edward Bliss Reed, editor, Shakespeare's Sonnets, Yale University Press, Note 128.5:
        In the virginal, an upright piece of wood fixed to the key-lever and fitted with a quill which plucked the string as the jack rose when the key was pressed down. Here used as "key."
    3. (obsolete) A support for wood being sawn; a sawhorse or sawbuck. [16th–19th c.]
    4. A device used to hold a boot by the heel, to assist in removing the boot. [from 17th c.]
    5. A mechanical device used to raise and (temporarily) support a heavy object, now especially to lift one side of a motor vehicle when (e.g.) changing a tyre. [from 17th c.]
      She used a jack to lift her car and changed the tire.
    6. Any of various levers for raising or lowering the sinkers which push the loops down on the needles in a knitting machine or stocking frame. [from 18th c.]
    7. (mining, now rare) A wedge for separating rocks rent by blasting. [from 19th c.]
    8. (obsolete) A grating device used to separate and guide the threads in a warping machine; a heck box. [19th c.]
    9. (obsolete) A machine for twisting the sliver as it leaves a carding machine, in the preparation of yarn. [19th–20th c.]
    10. (electronics) A switch for a jack plug, a jackknife switch; (more generally) a socket used to connect a device to a circuit, network etc. [from 19th c.]
      telephone jack
  3. A non-tool object or thing.
    1. (now historical, regional) A pitcher or other vessel for holding liquid, especially alcoholic drink; a black-jack. [from 16th c.]
      • 1693, John Dryden, Fifth Satire of Persius
        Dead wine, that stinks of the borrachio, sup From a foul jack
      • 1820-25, Charles Lamb, in The Essays of Elia (1830)
        He had his tea and hot rolls in a morning, while we were battening upon our quarter-of-a-penny loaf — our crug — moistened with attenuated small beer, in wooden piggings, smacking of the pitched leathern jack it was poured from.
    2. (card games) The lowest court card, ranking between the 10 and queen, with an image of a knave or pageboy on it; a knave. [from 17th c.]
    3. (bowls) A small, typically white, ball used as the target ball in bowls; a jack-ball. [from 17th c.]
      • 1822, Walter Scott, Peveril of the Peak[1]:
        like an uninstructed bowler, so to speak, who thinks to attain the jack, by delivering his bowl straight forward upon it
    4. (nautical) A small ship's flag used as a signal or identifying device; a small flag flown at the bow of the vessel. [from 17th c.]
    5. (Britain, regional, now rare, historical) A measure of liquid corresponding to a quarter of a pint. [from 18th c.]
      (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
    6. (obsolete, slang) A fake coin designed to look like a sovereign. [19th c.]
    7. (nautical, now rare, historical) A jack crosstree[1].. [from 19th c.]
    8. (games) A small, six-pointed playing piece used in the game of jacks. [from 19th c.]
    9. (US) A torch or other light used in hunting to attract or dazzle game at night. [from 19th c.]
      (Can we find and add a quotation of Charles Hallock to this entry?)
    10. (slang, chiefly US) Money. [from 19th c.]
      • 1939, Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep, Penguin 2011, page 133:
        First off Regan carried fifteen grand, packed it in his clothes all the time. Real money, they tell me. Not just a top card and a bunch of hay. That's a lot of jack [] .
    11. (colloquial, euphemistic) Nothing, jack shit. [from 20th c.]
      You haven't done jack. Get up and get this room cleaned up right now!
    12. (cricket, slang) The eleventh batsman to come to the crease in an innings.
    13. (slang, Appalachians) A smooth often ovoid large gravel or small cobble in a natural water course.
  4. A plant or animal.
    1. A pike, especially when young. [from 16th c.]
    2. (chiefly US) A male ass, especially when kept for breeding. [from 17th c.]
    3. Any of the marine fish in the family Carangidae. [from 17th c.]
      Synonym: jack mackerel
    4. (US) A jackrabbit. [from 19th c.]
      • 1932, Isabel T. Kelly, “Ethnography of the Surprise Valley Paiute”, in University of California Publications in California Archaeology an Ethnography, volume 31, number 3, page 88:
        Cottontails were taken along the creeks, under the willows. Their flesh was preferable to that of the jacks [] "
    5. A large California rockfish, the bocaccio, Sebastes paucispinis.
    6. Mangifera caesia, related to the mango tree.
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
  • (female ended electrical connector): plug
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]
Playing cards in English · playing cards (layout · text)
40 Asso di picche.jpg 41 Due di picche.jpg 42 Tre di picche.jpg 43 Quattro di picche.jpg 44 Cinque di picche.jpg 45 Sei di picche.jpg 46 Sette di picche.jpg
ace deuce, two three four five six seven
47 Otto di picche.jpg 48 Nove di picche.jpg 49 Dieci di picche.jpg 50 J di picche.jpg 51 Q di picche.jpg 52 K di picche.jpg Jolly Nero.jpg
eight nine ten jack, knave queen king joker, jolly joker

Verb[edit]

jack (third-person singular simple present jacks, present participle jacking, simple past and past participle jacked)

  1. (transitive) To raise using a jack.
    He jacked the car up so that he could replace the brake pads.
    Synonym: jack up
  2. (transitive) To raise or increase.
    If you want to jack your stats you just write off failures as invalid results.
  3. To produce by freeze distillation; to distil (an alcoholic beverage) by freezing it and removing the ice (which is water), leaving the alcohol (which remains liquid).
    • 1941, Esquire, volume 15, issues 1-3, page 176:
      Fruit of the orchard has been "jacked" these many generations, with Plymouth Rockers putting the hard cider barrel down into the ground to freeze, and []
    • 2010, Scott Mansfield, Strong Waters: A Simple Guide to Making Beer, Wine, Cider ... →ISBN
      The potency of a jacked beverage depends on the temperature applied to the original beverage; the colder the liquor, the more water can be frozen out [] . In New England, where this technique was historically used, people could get applejack to around 30 percent alcohol [] .
  4. (transitive, colloquial) To steal something, typically an automobile. Shortened form of carjacking.
    Someone jacked my car last night!
  5. (intransitive) To dance by moving the torso forward and backward in a rippling motion.
  6. (colloquial, vulgar) To jack off, to masturbate.
    • 2017, Diamond Johnson, Finding My Way Back to Love 2, Sullivan Group Publishing (→ISBN):
      I don't even care about mine, I can get my shit off while jacking in the shower.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

jack (comparative more jack, superlative most jack)

  1. (Australia) Tired, disillusioned; fed up (with). [from 19th c.]
    • 2006, Alexis Wright, Carpentaria, Giramondo 2012, p. 78:
      In the end, black and white were both crawling on the ground in reconciliation. Both saying that they were plain jack of each other.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Portuguese jaca (jackfruit), from Malayalam ചക്ക (cakka).

Noun[edit]

jack (plural jacks)

  1. The edible fruit of the Asian tree (Artocarpus heterophyllus); also the tree itself. [from 16th c.]

Etymology 4[edit]

This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Noun[edit]

jack (plural jacks)

  1. (slang, baseball) A home run.
    • 2001 October 8, Ray Dames, “Re: McGwire's Year”, in rec.sport.baseball, Usenet[2]:
      The year before ('76) Kingman had 37 jacks with only 502 PAs. Is that the limit?
    • 2002 April 18, Perry, “Re: To all you Oakland A's fans...”, in rec.sport.baseball, Usenet[3]:
      Me three. I never have quite understood all the "three true outcomes" fetish around here. I mean, I know that building an offense around walks and 3-run jacks embodies the Sabermetric Virtues, and especially in today's conditions that's the way to win, but man, it sure leads to some slow, boring games.
    • 2004 January 18, Terrell Miller, “Re: Does playing for the 3-run home run really help you win championships?”, in rec.sport.baseball, Usenet[4]:
      3-run jacks are just another tool in a team's chest. The goal is to make the playoffs, then win at least one more game than your opponent each round. And repeat next year, and the year after that, and...

Verb[edit]

jack (third-person singular simple present jacks, present participle jacking, simple past and past participle jacked)

  1. (transitive, slang, baseball) To hit (the ball) hard; especially, to hit (the ball) out of the field, producing a home run.
    • 1986, in Arete: The Journal of Sport Literature, Volume 4,[5] Sport Literature Association:
      An excellent piece of work, Wayne thought, so good in fact, he wasn’t surprised when Bailey walked to the plate and on the first pitch jacked the ball far into the parking lot outside the left-field fence for a tournament winning homerun.
    • 2004, Wayne Stewart, Hitting Secrets of the Pros: Big League Sluggers Reveal the Tricks of Their Trade, McGraw-Hill Professional, →ISBN, page 90:
      Therefore, even though Vizquel is certainly not a power hitter, at times he will try to jack the ball, perhaps pulling it with just enough oomph to carry down the line for a homer.
    • a. 2009, Jim McManus, quoted in T.J. Lewis, A View from the Mound: My Father’s Life in Baseball, Lulu.com (publisher, 2008), →ISBN, page 107:
      Maybe he hung a curve ball to somebody and they jacked it out of the park on him and he wasn’t upset about it.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]


References[edit]

  1. ^ 1841, Richard Henry Dana Jr., The Seaman's Friend



Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English jack.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

jack n (plural jacks, diminutive jackje n)

  1. jacket

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English jack.

Noun[edit]

jack m (plural jacks)

  1. jack (an electronic connector mounted on a surface)
  2. (Brazil, slang) A rapist (specifically a male one)

Romanian[edit]

Noun[edit]

jack n (plural jackuri)

  1. Alternative form of geac