boot

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See also: Boot and BOOT

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
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Boots, noun - etymology 1, definition 1

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English boote, bote (shoe), from Old French bote (a high, thick shoe). Of obscure origin, but probably related to Old French bot (club-foot), bot (fat, short, blunt), from Old Frankish *butt, from Proto-Germanic *buttaz, *butaz (cut off, short, numb, blunt), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰewt-, *bʰewd- (to strike, push, shock); if so, a doublet of butt. Compare Old Norse butt (stump), Low German butt (blunt, plump), Old English bytt (small piece of land), buttuc (end). More at buttock and debut.

Noun[edit]

boot (plural boots)

  1. A heavy shoe that covers part of the leg.
    1. (sports) A kind of sports shoe worn by players of certain games such as cricket and football.
  2. A blow with the foot; a kick.
  3. (construction) A flexible cover of rubber or plastic, which may be preformed to a particular shape and used to protect a shaft, lever, switch, or opening from dust, dirt, moisture, etc.
  4. (usually preceded by definite article) A torture device used on the feet or legs, such as a Spanish boot.
    • 1936, Rollo Ahmed, The Black Art, London: Long, page 221:
      The boot, thumbscrews, the shackles, and a contraption called the "warm hose", were only a few of the inflictions being too terrible to mention.
  5. (US) A parking enforcement device used to immobilize a car until it can be towed or a fine is paid; a wheel clamp.
  6. (aviation) A rubber bladder on the leading edge of an aircraft’s wing, which is inflated periodically to remove ice buildup; a deicing boot.
  7. (obsolete) A place at the side of a coach, where attendants rode; also, a low outside place before and behind the body of the coach.
  8. (archaic) A place for baggage at either end of an old-fashioned stagecoach.
  9. (US, military, law enforcement, slang) A recently arrived recruit; a rookie.
  10. (Australia, Britain, New Zealand, South Africa, automotive) The luggage storage compartment of a sedan or saloon car.
    • 1998, Ruth Rendell, A Sight For Sore Eyes, 2010, page 260,
      He heaved the bag and its contents over the lip of the boot and on to the flagstones. When it was out, no longer in that boot but on the ground, and the bag was still intact, he knew the worst was over.
    • 2003, Keith Bluemel, Original Ferrari V-12 1965-1973: The Restorer's Guide, unnumbered page,
      The body is constructed of welded steel panels, with the bonnet, doors and boot lid in aluminium on steel frames.
    • 2008, MB Chattelle, Richmond, London: The Peter Hacket Chronicles, page 104,
      Peers leant against the outside of the car a lit up her filter tip and watched as Bauer and Putin placed their compact suitcases in the boot of the BMW and slammed the boot lid down.
  11. (informal, with definite article) The act or process of removing or firing someone (dismissing them from a job or other post).
    He was useless so he got the boot.
  12. (Britain, slang) An unattractive person, ugly woman.
    old boot
  13. (slang, ethnic slur) A black person.
    • 1964 [1957], Colin MacInnes, City of Spades, London: Penguin Books, page 22:
      My Dad has taught me that in England some foolish man may call me sambo, darkie, boot or munt or nigger, even.
  14. (firearms) A hard plastic case for a long firearm, typically moulded to the shape of the gun and intended for use in a vehicle.
  15. (baseball) A bobbled ball.
  16. (botany) The inflated flag leaf sheath of a wheat plant.
  17. (slang) A linear amplifier used with CB radio.
    • 1977, New Scientist (volume 74, page 764)
      Because of overcrowding, many a CB enthusiast (called an "apple") is strapping an illegal linear amplifier ("boots") on to his transceiver ("ears") []
  18. (slang, motorsports) A tyre.
  19. (US) A crust end-piece of a loaf of bread.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Serbo-Croatian:
    Cyrillic: бу́це
    Latin: búce
  • Swahili: buti
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

boot (third-person singular simple present boots, present participle booting, simple past and past participle booted)

  1. To kick.
    I booted the ball toward my teammate.
    • 2017 January 14, “Thailand's new king rejects the army's proposed constitution”, in The Economist[1]:
      The one certainty is that the redrafting will delay by several months the general election that was supposed to be held at the end of this year. Mr Prayuth has implied that elections cannot now be held until after King Vajiralongkorn's coronation, which itself cannot take place until after his father's elaborate cremation, scheduled for October. All this boots the long-promised polls well into 2018.
  2. To put boots on, especially for riding.
    • 1641, Ben Jonson, Discoveries Made upon Men and Matter
      Coated and booted for it.
  3. (colloquial, Canada, US, usually with it) To step on the accelerator of a vehicle for faster acceleration than usual or to drive faster than usual.
    The storm is coming fast! Boot it!
    We had to boot it all the way there to get to our flight on time.
  4. To apply corporal punishment (compare slippering).
  5. (informal) To eject; kick out.
    We need to boot those troublemakers as soon as possible.
    The senator was booted from the committee for unethical behavior.
  6. (often with up) To start or restart a computer or other electronic system; to bootstrap.
    Boot up the system before 8 a.m. on weekdays.
  7. (computing, informal) To disconnect forcibly; to eject from an online service, conversation, etc.
    • 2002, Dan Verton, The Hacker Diaries - Page 67
      As an IRC member with operator status, Swallow was able to manage who was allowed to remain in chat sessions and who got booted off the channel.
    • 2003, John C. Dvorak, Chris Pirillo, Online! - Page 173
      Even flagrant violators of the TOS are not booted.
    • 2002, Jobe Makar, Macromedia Flash Mx Game Design Demystified - Page 544
      In Electroserver, the kick command disconnects a user totally from the server and gives him a message about why he was booted.
  8. (slang) To vomit.
    Sorry, I didn’t mean to boot all over your couch.
  9. (MLE, criminal slang) To shoot, to kill by gunfire.
    • 2015 November 1, C4 (814) (lyrics), “Dem Man Know”:
      C4 run man through the alley
      Get a man down with the swammy
      Get a man down with the whammy
      Boot couple niggas on the road
      No face no case with the bally (booting)
Usage notes[edit]

The more common term for “to eject from a chatroom” etc. is kick.

Synonyms[edit]
  • (kick): hoof, kick
  • (disconnect from online conversation): kick
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English boote, bote, bot, from Old English bōt (help, relief, advantage, remedy; compensation for an injury or wrong; (peace) offering, recompense, amends, atonement, reformation, penance, repentance), from Proto-Germanic *bōtō (atonement, improvement), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰed- (good). Akin to Old Norse bót (bettering, remedy) (Danish bod), Gothic 𐌱𐍉𐍄𐌰 (bōta), German Buße. Doublet of bote (a borrowing from Middle English).

Noun[edit]

boot (countable and uncountable, plural boots)

  1. (archaic, dialectal) Remedy, amends.
  2. (uncountable) Profit, plunder.
  3. (countable, uncountable) That which is given to make an exchange equal, or to make up for the deficiency of value in one of the things exchanged; compensation; recompense.
    • c. 1602, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Troylus and Cressida”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act IV, scene v]:
      I'll give you boot, I'll give you three for one.
    • 2008, Jeffrey H. Rattiner, Financial Planning Answer Book 2009 (page 6-43)
      If mortgaged property is transferred, the amount of the mortgage is part of the boot. If both parties to the transaction transfer mortgages to each other, the party giving up the larger debt treats the excess as taxable boot.
    • 2021, Eli Amir, Marco Ghitti, Financial Analysis of Mergers and Acquisitions (page 117)
      If the target retains the boot and uses it for, say, paying its debt, there is taxation on the boot.
  4. (obsolete) Profit; gain; advantage; use.
  5. (obsolete) Repair work; the act of fixing structures or buildings. [to mid-17th c.]
  6. (obsolete) A medicinal cure or remedy. [to mid-16th c.]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

boot (third-person singular simple present boots, present participle booting, simple past and past participle booted)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To avail, benefit, profit.
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To benefit, to enrich; to give in addition.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Clipping of bootstrap.

Noun[edit]

boot (plural boots)

  1. (computing) The act or process of bootstrapping; the starting or re-starting of a computing device.
    It took three boots, but I finally got the application installed.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

boot (third-person singular simple present boots, present participle booting, simple past and past participle booted)

  1. (computing) To bootstrap; to start a system, e.g. a computer, by invoking its boot process or bootstrap.
    Synonyms: bootstrap, boot up, start
    Antonyms: shut down, stop, turn off
    When arriving at the office, the first thing I do is boot my machine.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

From bootleg (to make or sell illegally), by shortening.

Noun[edit]

boot (plural boots)

  1. (informal) A bootleg recording.
    • 1999, "Tom Fletcher", Looking for Iron Maiden boot traders (on newsgroup alt.music.bootlegs)
      I am looking to trade Iron Maiden boots. I have many Iron Maiden bootlegs. I have lots of Metallica. I trade CDR's, tapes and videos.
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch boot.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

boot (plural bote)

  1. boat

References[edit]

  1. ^ 2007. The UCLA Phonetics Lab Archive. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Department of Linguistics.

Bikol Central[edit]

Noun[edit]

boot

  1. Alternative spelling of buot

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch boot, from Middle English bot (boat, ship), from Old English bāt, from Proto-Germanic *baitaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

boot m (plural boten, diminutive bootje n)

  1. boat

Synonyms[edit]

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Karao[edit]

Noun[edit]

boot

  1. mold

Mansaka[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From *buut, from Proto-Austronesian *buhet.

Noun[edit]

boot

  1. squirrel

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

boot

  1. Alternative form of bote (boot)

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

boot

  1. Alternative form of bote (help, aid)

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

boot

  1. Alternative form of bot (boat)

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English boot.

Noun[edit]

boot m (plural boots)

  1. (computing) boot (the act or process of bootstrapping)

Quotations[edit]

For quotations using this term, see Citations:boot.


Tetum[edit]

Adjective[edit]

boot

  1. big