botter

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See also: Botter

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

bot +‎ -er

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

botter (plural botters)

  1. (Internet) One who operates a bot (automated software process).
    • 2008, New Scientist (volume 200, issues 2682-2688, page 28)
      It is estimated by industry and leading botters that only around 1 in 10 players using bots make a profit, mainly in low-stakes games.

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From a dialectal variant of Dutch boter, from Middle Dutch bōter, from Old Dutch *butera, from Latin būtȳrum, from Ancient Greek βούτυρον (boúturon).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

botter (plural botters, diminutive bottertjie)

  1. (uncountable) butter; a soft, fatty foodstuff made from the cream of milk
  2. butter type
    Ons het 'n klomp gegeurde botters beskikbaar.
    We have a lot of flavoured butter [types]/butters available.
  3. (chemistry, dated) butter; any specific soft substance
Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

botter (present botter, present participle botterende, past participle gebotter)

  1. to butter; to spread butter

Etymology 2[edit]

From Dutch botter.

Noun[edit]

botter (plural botters, diminutive bottertjie)

  1. a type of Dutch fishing vessel with a characteristic hull (Can we verify(+) this sense?)

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɔtər/
  • (file)
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Etymology 1[edit]

Botter (Dutch fishing vessel).

Uncertain. Perhaps an action noun from bot (flounder) +‎ -er after a type of fish fished for with the vessel, or from bot (blunt) from the characteristic shape of its bow.

Noun[edit]

botter m (plural botters, diminutive bottertje n)

  1. a type of Dutch fishing vessel with a characteristic hull

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Adjective[edit]

botter

  1. Comparative form of bot

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From botte (boot) +‎ -er.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

botter

  1. to kick
  2. (slang) to please, to like
    Ça te botterait d'aller au ciné?
    Would you like to go the cinema?

Usage notes[edit]

In the sense please it functions syntactically like plaire, viz. it takes an indirect object and may be translated into English as like, exchanging the subject and object.

Conjugation[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

botte (boot) +‎ -er

Verb[edit]

botter

  1. (Jersey) to boot